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EVERYDAY 
PRONUNCIATION 



Books on English 
every-day pronunciation 

By Robert Palfrey Utter 
CRABB'S SYNONYMES (Centennia! Edition) 
A GUIDE TO GOOD ENGLISH 

By Robert Palfrey Utter 
EVERY-DAY WORDS AND THEIR USES 

By Robert Palfrey Utter 
STANDARD PRONUNCIATION IN ENGLISH 

Thomas R. Lounabury 
ENGLISH SPELLING AND SPELLING REFORM 

Thomas R. Lounsbury 
THE STANDARD OF USAGE IN ENGLISH 

Thomas R. Lounsberry 
EVERYBODY'S WRITING-DESK BOOK 



HARPER & BROTHERS. NEW YORK 

[ESTABLISHKD 1817] 



EVERY- DAY 
PRONUNCIATION 



BY 
ROBERT PALFREY UTTER, Ph.D. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OP ENGLISH 
IN AMHERST COLLEGE 

Author of "A Guide to Good Enolish" 
and "Bverjfday Words and Their (/«ea" 




'*'"»»*, V' t» ! ' • 



HARPER y BROTHERS PUBLISHERS 
NEW YORK AND LONDON 



g^\ 



u"^ 



•» « • • • • . 



■»•'•••" 



Everyday Pronunciation 
Copyright. 1918. by Harper & Brothers 
Printed in the United Sta^e? pf America 



To 
PHILIP WEST PAYNE 

"k;Ko died ilUstarredy 

and died beloved and young, 

andy therefore, blest and wise^* 



5(>rj8G4 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2007 with funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



http://www.archive.org/details/everydaypronunciOOutterich 



CONTENTS 

Preface xx 

Guiding Principles in Pronunciation 1 

Laws and Standards. — The Scope and Aim of This Book. 
— The Notation of Sounds. — Stress. — Family Names. — 
Foreign Words. — ** Progress" in Pronunciation. — Prog- 
ress as a Conscious Process. — The Duty of the Individual. 

Key to Pronunciation 15 

Abbreviations 21 

Alphabetical List op Words 23 



PREFACE 

In the pages immediately following I have placed, for 
various reasons, much of the material often put into 
prefaces; there I have explained what I am trying to 
do, and how I have set about to do it. For the preface, 
then, I have naught left but to acknowledge my obHga- 
tions, which makes it few of words and full of import. 
I am, of course, most heavily indebted to all dictionary 
makers, on whose work I have of necessity depended so 
much that I can acknowledge my indebtedness only in 
general. For encouraging companionship and scholarly 
help in the first stages of the work, I am most heartily 
grateful to Mr. PhiUp W. Payne, who in more fortunate 
circumstances would have been my collaborator through- 
out. For faithful and accurate work on some of the less 
inspiring parts of the task I am indebted to Miss Florence 
El well, of Amherst; and to Miss Agnes V. Doherty, Miss 
Ethel wyn Manning, and Miss Luella M. Nash, of the staff 
of the Amherst College Library. 

R. P. U. 

Amhebst College, April, 1918. 



EVERYDAY 
PRONUNCIATION 

GUIDING PRINCIPLES IN 
PRONUNCIATION 

A BiANUAL or dictionary that indicates pronunciation 
usually professes to do one of two things: to tell us how 
we do pronounce, or to tell us how we should pronounce. 
A third ideal is possible, that of this book, which is in- 
tended to tell us how we may pronounce without reproach. 
The idea of the compiler is not 



Thus gods are made, 

And whoso makes them otherwise shall die. 



but rather 



There are nine and sixty ways of making tribal lays, 
And every single one of them is right. 



Laws and Standards 

{ In other words, there are no "laws" of phonetics or of 

1 pronunciation; there are merely habits and tendencies. 

There are no definite, ascertainable "standards" of "cor- 



2 ' ' ' ' '*EVEliy*DAY PRONUNCIATION 

rect"' pPonunGiati&nV tKere are merely generalizations 
more or less inclusive as to the practice of the ''best 
speakers" or "careful speakers/' The law of falling 
bodies is a law in the sense that it is inevitable and in- 
violable; there is no authentic record of a falling body 
that succeeded in breaking it. There is no law of lan- 
guage that has not been broken times beyond number, 
that cannot be broken as many times again. Such gen- 
eralizations as we make in regard to language approach 
sometimes more and sometimes less nearly to univer- 
sality, but it is safe to say that not one of them is truly 
a universal. ''Shall we, then, have no standards?'' asks 
the purist. Certainly, the more the better. If they are 
before us, they lure us on. If they are behind us, they 
demonstrate our progress. A standard should be at once 
as free and as steady as the needle of the compass; it 
should be valued for its power to show us where we are 
going, but it must not be taken to set a limit to the 
advance. A fixed standard is good only when it is fixed 
at a given distance before us as we move. If the purist 
calls for unchanging standards and universal conformity, 
we may be glad that he cannot get what he wants. If 
what he calls for is intelligent direction, a view of some 
goal not necessarily ultimate, and determination of the 
road, he stands for the best kind of progress. 

In spite of all this, we do not and need not dwell in 
chaos. In pronunciation, whatever is, is right, only in 
the sense that every man may pronounce as he pleases 
if he is willing to take the consequences. The sturdy bar- 
rier between us and chaos in pronunciation, as in all 
matters of language, is the social penalty on eccentricity. 
Conventionality is the only law of pronunciation that has 
any teeth. Nor is it always a foe to progress, for more 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 3 

often than not it involves some ideal; if it is conformity, 
it is usually conformity to the usage of the circle in which 
one aspires to be, and even conformity is progress when 
it is conformity to something just beyond. 

The Scope and Aim of This Book 

The object of this book, then, is to indicate a pro- 
nunciation of each word listed that would in most walks 
of society pass without challenge, that if challenged can 
be defended as widely acceptable among good speakers. 
For such pronunciations I do not claim authority, but 
merely common-sense, experience, and access to the 
records such as they are. I have included approximately 
ten thousand words, most of them in our every-day 
vocabulary; some that are more or less technical, that 
is, words of every-day use to limited numbers of speak- 
ers; current foreign words and phrases, including such 
help as I could get on the sounds of proper names and 
other words that have become current since the outbreak 
of the present war. I have included a limited vocabulary 
of Scotch words, not, of course, with the expectation of 
turning any Yankee into a complete Scot, but with the 
hope of lowering a little the barrier that too often stands 
between Americans and the enjoyment of Scottish poetry. 
I have included a list, which I hope is large enough to be 
useful, of names from literature of real and fictitious per- 
sons and places. All these are in a single list, alpha- 
betically arranged from beginning to end. It is sup- 
posed to be inclusive enough for every-day needs — ^for 
really unusual words, there are the dictionaries and other 
sources of information — ^yet not so large as to be for- 
ipidablQ ox di8cou^9'gi^g, In all cases I have tried tq 



4 EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 

represent sound American usage; British usage is spe- 
cifically indicated as such where it is shown. In no case 
have I shown an incorrect or undesirable pronunciation, 
not even to justify my inclusion of a word. If a reader 
does not see how one or another of these words could 
possibly be mispronounced, let him rejoice and pass on, 
secure in the belief that ''what he doesn't know won't 
hurt him." A colleague asked me why I included the 
name Belknap; nobody, he declared, could possibly go 
wrong on it. I included it because I had asked a bearer 
of the name whether any one ever mispronounced it. 
"Yes," he replied, ''It is mispronounced in fifty different 
ways." 

The Notation of Sounds 

The system of notation of sounds that I have used 
differs in several particulars from others that I might 
have used. I do not profess to believe it better in any 
general way than others, but merely better for the par- 
ticular purpose in hand. It is not scientifically accurate, 
but is as accurate as is compatible with the requisite 
degree of simplicity. For most of us, ease of comprehen- 
sion in such a system is more important than it is to carry 
out the shades of variation in vowel sounds to the fifth 
or sixth decimal place. I have thought it best, there- 
fore, to use no letters but the familiar ones, and to indi- 
cate their sounds by diacritical marks. These marks are 
explained by the key words which are to be found at the 
bottom of each page. They will enable any one without 
previous knowledge of the system to get at once the 
sound of any word in every-day use, — ^f or a few unusual 
words he will have to refer to the complete key given 
on pages 15-20. The key words are those generally 



EVERT-DAY PRONUNCIATION 5 

accepted as standards. The assumption is that the 
sounds of these words on the tongues of American speak- 
ers are as nearly uniform as anything we can get, and are 
near enough to imiformity to be useful for the purpose. 
Vowel sounds, more than consonant soimds, are like colors 
in the infinite nmnber of gradations and combinations of 
which they are capable, and in the fact that the agree- 
ment on the standards is general but not universal, and 
that on the shades and combinations it is not even 
general. It should be xmderstood, then, that whatever 
discussion this book contains of the nature and use of 
English sounds is offered not as a rule or law, but merely 
as generalization so far as the process seems safe. 

Stress 

Just as it IS diflScult, if not impossible, to express in 
print the infinite gradations in vowel sounds, so also does 
the matter of accent or stress present almost insuperable 
difficulties to one who wishes to express the whole truth 
in intelligible notation. In the dictionaries it seems fairly 
simple. There, stresses are of two grades, ''primary'' 
and "secondary." On certain syllables these accents 
definitely belong, and they are misplaced if they are 
placed otherwise, imless it be in cases in which "usage 
is divided." But an attentive ear tells us a different 
story. We hear in speech a thousand gradations in 
amount of stress. We hear surprising variations in the 
position of the stress in the speech of persons whom we 
know to be careful speakers, and who believe themselves 
to be consistent. There are probably many causes work- 
ing here, some of which are doubtless unknown, others of 
which may be guessed at, — ^if all could be systematically 



6 EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 

studied, the dictionaries might be more intelligently re- 
vised. One is sentence modulation. As we speak them, 
our sentences have something corresponding to accent 
in words, a rising and falling cadence, wavelike, with 
more regularity than we are normally conscious of — ^so 
much, indeed, that almost any sentence is rhythmic 
enough for free verse if it is so printed as to call attention 
to its rhythm. In one sentence it may be one syllable 
of a given word that finds itself at the crest of a wave; 
in another, another. A speaker, for example, who beUeves 
that he always stresses the last syllable of magazine as the 
dictionaries tell him to do, might at one time say, ''I de^s^ 
a devout maga^ime,'' but in a sentence of a different 
cadence, as "I still read Harper^s MagsLzine/' stress the 
word differently, and if he caught himself in the act, 
might wonder why he did it. The word automobile in our 
daily speech finds itself sometimes with its middle syllable 
on the crest of the wave, sometimes in the trough with 
the two ends on the crests, — there is scarcely a possible 
variation that does not occur, aut'omobile, automo'bile, 
automobile', aut'omobile', and the dictionaries know not 
where to have it. 

Stress, too, is important in pronunciation for its effect 
on the quality of vowels, — ^note, for example, the different 
sounds of i in advertisement and advertisement, in little and 
"Zeetle,'* a form which results from the attempt at ex- 
cessive emphasis. Sometimes, again, it works the other 
way — the attempt to give a vowel its quality leads to an 
apparent misplacing of the stress. If you attempt to give 
the e in the third syllable of interesting its full value, you 
will certainly be accused of saying interest'ing. If you try 
to put the stress where it belongs, you appear to say int'- 
resting^ and are accused of a slovenly clipping of the vowel. 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 7 

The fact is that the time necessary to careful pronuncia- 
tion of a vowel is also an element of stress, — ^and very- 
likely the other element of stress, the slight variation in 
pitch, also enters into the process of giving the vowel its 
full value. In a word, we emphasize every vowel we pro- 
nounce carefully, especially if we do it consciously. Con- 
versely, we tend to reduce to the obscure or neutral sound 
all vowels in imstressed syllables. The vowels in un- 
stressed you, are, and, and the, or in combinations like 
''gonna," "gotta," and "ottermobile," might be any- 
thing, a, e, i, 0, OT um. any of their sounds, for all one 
could tell by ear. This fact accounts for many of the 
difficulties of those who spell by ear alone; "sentance" 
and ''accidently" represent the phonetic fact quite as 
well as the conventional forms. 

The discussion of stress might be greatly prolonged, but 
it would be to small profit imless it were to lead to results 
I cannot hope to attain here. The point is that the facts, 
even if I knew them, are too complicated to be represented 
by any system of notation which I could expect any one 
to read easily. I have, therefore, marked the stressed 
syllable in each word as it is usually understood. So 
much can at least be read at a glance, and it is usually all 
that is required. 

Family Names 

I have omitted many British and American family 
names that are included in other manuals, because I 
recognize the right of any family to pronounce its name 
as it pleases, and I do not recognize the right of the lexi- 
cographer to tell them how they "ought" to pronounce 
it. Historical or etymological considerations may point 
to a certain pronunciation for a given name, but unless 



8 EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 

the bearer of the name chooses to regard them, they da 
not weigh against actual usage. In some cases we know 
how eminent individuals pronounced the names they 
bore, — we know how the poet Cowper rhymed his name, 
for example, but his prommciation lays no injunction on 
other bearers of the name. The same thing is true of com- 
mon baptismal names, both as to spelling and prommcia- 
tion. If one who bears the name Helena chooses to be 
called Hele'na, or if one named Cicely elects to spell it 
Sicily, by what ^'law" of orthoepy or orthography may 
we say that she is '^ wrong,'' however great the incon- 
venience to which she puts us by her vagary? 

Foreign Words 

Another debatable land in which it is hard to find and 

pold a defensible position is the matter of Anglicization 

/ of foreign words and names. As a rule, we like to exhibit 

' our familiarity with languages we know, and are prone 

to denounce as affectation exhibition on the part of others 

of familiarity with languages we do not know. To one 

who knows Spanish but not Norwegian it may sound 

barbarous to hear Don Juan and Do7i Quixote sounded as 

if they were English names, and affected to hear Peer 

Gynt sotmded as if it were anything else. Here expert 

ence is the only guide; it shows us only that as soon *-• 

words come into daily use on the vulgar tongue they wTil 

be subdued to the tongues that sound them. Ypres be^ 

comes Wipers at first perhaps in jest, but the jest soon 

j passes. The taube when it became a daily visitant to 

/ Tommy became tawb, San Bernardino becomes San 

\ B^doo, and puzzles the Easterner until he discovers it 

in the abbreviation of the railroad time-table. 



1 



BVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 9 

"Progress** in Pronunciation 

The idea of "progress" in the matter of pronunciation 
is one that may need some explanation. It may be the 
more readily imderstood if we reflect on the important 
changes in language which have been brought about 
primarily, it is safe to say, by local variations in pro- 
nunciation. We think of Latin, for example, as a "dead" 
language, but it is not dead except in the sense that we 
have a fixed and unalterable portrait of it in one stage of 
its existence, — ^it is no more dead than is the child you 
once were, whose portrait, unchangeable in any slightest 
feature, looks out at you from the confines of its rigid 
frame. "Vulgar" Latin, — the colloquial or spoken Latin 
which differed from that of Cicero as the language of our 
city streets or that of our country roads differs from 
that of Addison, — changed gradually century by century, 
till the accumulation of the changes of twenty centuries 
is the difference between Latin and modem Italian. It 
was carried into Gaul where Gallic tongues turned it 
differently and made it ultimately into modem French; 
into Iberia, where changes similar in process but differ- 
ent in nature and effect turned it at last into Spanish. 
Latin has never died. Modem Italian is just as clearly 
Latin as English is Anglo-Saxon; the history is continu- 
ous from one to the other. Latin has changed greatly, 
but it is vigorous in itself, and in its descendants. And 
just as French comes from Latin, so Latin comes from 
something earlier, — at the beginning of the process, we 
can only guess. 

"It is difference of opinion," sajrs Mark Twain's pro- 
found philosopher — Pudd'nhead Wilson — "that makes 
horse-races," and horse-races, in the philosopher's thought, 



to EVERY-DAT PRONUNCIATION 

relieve the monotony of life. It is difference of pro- 
nunciation that makes languages, and we may perhaps 
be glad for the vulgarities of speech which have relieved, 
a continent or two from complete uniformity of language. 
But relief from monotony is not necessarily progress. 
''Mispronunciation" has done more for us than that. 
It was long customary for linguists to speak of the ''de- 
cay'' of language in discussing the changes it undergoes 
in centuries of use, the reduction, for example, to mono- 
syllables of the polysyllabic forms of the earlier stages. 
But a Danish student, and friend, of the English language, 
Professor Otto Jespersen, has expressed in his Progress in 
Language a theory that has convinced most of his readers, 
to the effect that popular short cuts in pronunciation 
which have led to the loss of most inflectional endings in 
English have been gain, in that the change has brought 
ease and flexibility to the language with no loss of 
clearness or accuracy that need make us regret it. As 
one of his many examples, he brings up again the oft- 
cited instance of the "decay'' of the Gothic habaidedeima, 
which by rolling for centuries on various more or less Ger- 
manic tongues has become the EngUsh had. The tenor 
of his comment on the process is, "The English form is 
preferable, on the principle that any one who has to 
choose between walking one mile and four miles will, 
other things being equal, prefer the shorter cut. . . . K 
had has suffered from wear and tear in the long course of 
time, this means that the wear and tear of the people 
now using this form of speech is less than if they were 
still cumbered with the old giant habaidedeima." Indeed, 
it is not only one Goliath, but fifteen, that this one little 
word, worn down by centuries in the stream of popular 
^ge, h^ displaced, Professor Jespersen points out further 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 11 

that our system of personal pronouns and auxiliaries which 
express the shades of meaning carried by the old cirni- 
bersome forms, is much simpler than the complicated 
system of injflectional endings. The simplification does 
not mean loss of power, any more than would the use 
of a small engine to do the work of fifteen yoke of 
oxen. 

"Mispronunciation" does not account for the whole 
process; nor do we, when we so name a great part of it, 
understand the complicated interplay of tendencies and 
forces that make vulgar mispronunciation an efifective 
power in language. But even the briefest historical per- 
spective will show us that it is a force too important to 
be dismissed as mere ''vulgarity," too strong to be 
danmied back by the frown of the schoolmistress. Just 
as we to-day, rightly enough, frown on gonna and gotta 
for going to and got to, so doubtless did our forefathers 
frown on the slipshod speech that joined he and utan into 
butan, prefixed on and shortened it to ahutan, then to 
almte, and finally to about. If gotta for must, and gonna 
for abovl to, prove useful auxiliaries, vulgar pronunciation 
will have shown us helpful short cuts in our speech; if 
not, they will probably disappear. Of one thing we may 
be sure, they will be subjected to fiery tests, and if they 
survive we need have no fear of them. The fact that vul- 
gar pronunciation has helped language to eflSciency does 
not mean that its tendency is always for good and that 
it is to be encouraged and practised. Opposition must 
constantly be applied to it in order to test its incessant 
experiments in sounds and forms. The people, who have 
no fine shades of meaning to express, tend to simplify 
more than is willingly allowed by those who would 
make finer distinctions, those to whom simplification im- 



12 EVBRY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 

pairs efficiency. Their opposition is, and should be, vigor- 
ous and protracted; only so may we be sure that no 
changes will, become permanent in good usage and the 
written language unless they make for simplicity and 
flexibility without impairing necessary clearness. 

Progress as a Conscious Process 

But even if we grant Professor Jespersen's theory of 
progres^, and the part that pronunciation may play in 
it, we may still question how far it is or can ever be a 
conscious process, and what part intelligence may play 
in it. On this question probably no one can speak with 
authority, but anyone may argue from antecedent prob- 
ability. One who has ideals of pronimciation is usually 
one who has or aspires to some degree of refinement and 
education. Among persons of ^culture and education 
there are forces that tend more toward uniformity of 
ideals and practice than do the forces (in general the 
same operating less strongly) that operate among the 
less educated folk. Dialect variations are extreme among 
unlettered people, and slight among the highly educated. 
The ideal at its best is usually some such combination of 
simplicity of sound with accuracy and completeness of 
expression as Professor Jespersen calls progress. If there 
is more conservatism among the educated than among 
the unlettered, it is because they hold the double rather 
than the single ideal. Even among those who hold nearly 
the same ideals, we do not get complete uniformity of 
speech, however the dictionaries and manuals of pro- 
nunciation may represent us. Still less likelihood would 
there be of dead uniformity if the ideal should spread to 
. the uneducated. A goal within sight, then, and inteUigent 



BVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 13 

movement toward it surely does have its efiFect on lan- 
guage — popular mispronunciation does not make the only- 
path of progress, nor would it make such a path at all if 
the other force were not constant in its restraining effect. 
"Laws" will not take care of our speech for us, neither 
those we attempt to make and enforce, nor those we see 
in the generalizations of the linguist. The shaping forces 
are the thrust toward simplicity on the one hand, and 
that toward accuracy of expression on the other. If the 
amount and direction of these two forces could be ac- 
curately measured, we might be able to calculate the 
resultant, but we have not been able to do so as yet. 
The only care we can exercise is as to the amount and 
direction of such force as each of us has. 

The Duty of the Individual 

The duty of each one of us is to exercise such intelli- 
gence as he has. If you have a strong, original mind, 
you may be a leader; if not, you must conform, as you 
do in matters of dress, to the best usage you can find. 
Use your judgment in selecting your leader, and common- 
sense in following. If each one of us made up his mind 
how he wanted his words to soimd, and strove to make 
them sound so without mumble, drawl, or affectation; 
if he meant something and tried sincerely to say it; if 
he spoke from a full mind, a full heart, and full lungs 
(and an empty nose), he might safely leave the rest to 
law or chance. 

To such as have conscience in the matter of pronun- 
ciation, this book offers itself as guide and friend, — 
philosopher it does not profess to be, for it has no original 
contribution on the subject of American pronunciation. 



14 EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 

It would be more helpful if it had, — ^not necessarily to the 
individual, but to the cause at large. 

Before we can generalize much about pronunciation, 
we must have facts from which to draw our inferences. 
The first thing necessary is to know how we actually 
do pronounce, — without it, the attempt to improve is 
like dressing in the dark or without a mirror. We may 
know how we wish our clothes to look, but how can we 
know what to do to them to make them look so unless 
we have a mirror wherein to see what condition they are 
in? In the matter of speech, the mirror might be pro- 
vided by a series of studies in the best speech of the dif- 
ferent sections of the United States such as Sweet, Jones, 
and Grant, and various others have made of the speech 
of England and Scotland.* Such research is beyond the 
scope of this book. 

♦H. Sweet, Primer of Spoken English; D. Jones, An English 
Pronouncing Dictionary; W. Grant, The Pronunciation of English 
in Scotland. Jones's Dictionary contains a short selected list of 
similar studies. 



KEY TO PRONUNCIATION 

The vowel and consonant sounds indicated in this 
book are as follows: 

a as in die. 

The ordinary ''long a" sound in stressed syllables. 
S as in sentUe. 

The same as o, except that it is slightly obscured, 
pronounced in a shorter time interval; i. e., in un- 
stressed syllables, 
a as in cdre. 

In stressed syllables ending in r, in which situation 
other sounds of a tend toward this. Note, for example, 
the British pronunciation of words like Mary, 
a as in d/. 

The ordinary "short a," differing from the preceding 
mainly in the amount of time it takes. It occurs usu- 
ally in stressed syllables, as mdr^ry. 
a as in &ccord. 

This is the d as usually sounded in unstressed syl- 
lables, spmewhat obscured in sound, 
a as in arm. 

This is the Italian or open a. 
a as in ask. 

The medial a, half-way between ^ or d and a. It is 
used as a compromise between what might seem affec- 
tation in such words as half, calf, laugh (Idf), and 
hMf, cdlf, and the like, which are set down as pro- 
vincial or vulgar. 



16 EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 

& as in sofa. 

This is the more obscure sound of a occurring in un- 
stressed syllables. 

a as in unstressed that (th't). 

This sound is completely obscure; it is the sound 
represented by the inverted e (9) in many phonetic 
alphabets. This and other dotted vowels are used in 
this book instead of the inverted e in the attempt to 
save respelling. In ordinary speech the distinction is not 
made between a and a (or even the complete indeter- 
mination represented by the apostrophe) in such situa- 
tions as the third syllable of comfortablej and in the at- 
tempt to represent even careful usage one would be 
justified in using either. 

b has its usual value. 

c is not used in the respelling; its sounds are represented 
by s and k. 

ch has its English soimd, as in church, except where 
printed 

CH which represents the German or Scotch soimd, as 
in nicht, loch {niCHtj loCH). The sound is made with 
the tongue in position as to pronounce the word yes^ by 
expelling the breath voicelessly between the back of the 
tongue and the roof of the mouth. 

d has its usual value. 

dz represents the sound of either j or dg in jvdge (d^uzd), 

e as in eve. 

The ordinary "long'' sound of e. 

g as in event. 

This the e in unstressed syllables. In very many 

' cases it can hardly be distinguished from i; sociSte or 
sociUl would be about equally satisfactory as represent- 
ing the sound of the word. 



EVEEY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 17 

e as in Snd. 

This is the "short" sound of the vowel in stressed 
syllables. 
8 as in redrii. 

The "short" e in unstressed syllables, 
e as in Eden. 

This is the completely obscure sound of e, really not 
6 at all; the second e in emperor has the same sound 
as the o. See the comment on d. 
e as in there. 

This sound is indistinguishable from d. The symbol 
is used to save respelling. 
e as in err. 

In stressed syllables this is the same sound as ti. In 

unstressed syllables it is more or less obscured, as in 

such words as perfomiy sev^al, in many cases scarcely 

more than ^, as in runner. 

f has its usual value. 

g has only its "hard" sound, as in get; the "soft" sound 

of g, as in exaggerate, is represented by d? (see j). 
h has its usual value, 
i as in ice. 

This is the ordinary "long" i sound, 
i as in III. 

The "short" sound of i; see comment on 6. 
iu represents w as in use (ius). 

This is one of the "long" u sounds; see also do. 
j is not used in respelling; its ordinary sound, as in jety 

is represented by d?, as, judge, d^vdz. 
k has its ordinary value. 
1 has its ordinary value, 
m has its ordinary value, 
n unmarked has its usual sound. 



l8 EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 

n represents the nasal ng sound, as, hang, harj.; Anglican, 
Ari^glican, 

n represents the French nasal, as in mon, en {mon, on). 
It is not properly a consonant, but rather a nasal 
termination to four of the French vowel sounds, an, 
driy dn, un, — unlike the English nasal n, it cannot be 
pronounced apart from the vowel. Pronounce the 
vowel with the mouth well open, then say as much of 
the ng sound as you can with the mouth still open, — 
without bringing the teeth together or closing the 
throat. 

6 as in old. 

Commonly called ''long" o. 

6 as in 6hey, 

The long o slightly obscured as it sounds in unstressed 
syllables. 

6 as in 6rh. 

This is the sound represented by aw in law, and by 
other combinations in such words as aught, bought, etc. 

5 as in coffee. 

This sound is half-way between 6 and 6. 

6 as in 6dd, 

The sound ordinarily called "short" o. 

5 as in connect. 

The short o slightly obscured in unstressed syllables. 

6 as in emperor. 

Here the o sound is entirely obscured. 
6 as in the German mogen. 

The German o umlaut is more like the H than any 
other EngUsh sound, but differs from it in that it is 
pronounced with the lips rounded and with the tongue 
nearer the teeth than in u. It is the same as the 
French sound of eu. 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 19 

oi as in oil. 

Indicates the sound however it is commonly spelled, 
as, boyy hoi; leute (Germ.) loite, 
do 33 in foot 
65 as in fool 

This also represents one of the "long" u sounds, as 
in rule. 
ou as in out. 

Used in respelling to represent the sound wherever 
it occurs, as boWy bou; haymow y hdmou; and the like. 
p has its usual sound. 
q is not used in respelling; its common sound is represented 

hyk. 
r unmarked as in rat, parade. 

X represents the r in party motheVy as distinguished from 
that in great or parade. It is practically silent in Eng- 
land and in our Atlantic States. In other parts of the 
country it is a subject of controversy, but most care- 
ful speakers make it more or less obscure, 
sh has its usual value, as in shally and is used to represent 

the French cA, as in chaud {shod). 
th as in thin. 
%h as in that. 
A as in Urn. 

This is the same sound as i. 
ii as in Up. 

Commonly called ''short" u. 
u as in circus. 

Occurring in imstressed syllables; slightly more ob- 
scure than the foregoing, 
u as in co?isumate. 

In slurred syllables; quite obscure, 
ii as in menu, 



20 EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 

This is the French u, German u umlaut, pronounced 

with tongue and teeth in position to sound i and the 

lips rounded as for oo. 
For other sounds commonly indicated by u, see iu 

and 00. 
V has its usual value. 
w has its usual value. 
X as in vex is indicated by ks. 
y has only its consonant value, as in you. In respelling 

it is used chiefly to indicate the French 'liquid'' n or 

I {mouille), as in Boulogne, boolon'y\ 
z unmarked is sounded as in blaze, 
? has the value of zh, as in vision, viz'un. 



ABBREVIATIONS 

Abbreviations are few in the following pages, and those 
used will for the most part be intelligible from the con- 
text if not from the familiarity of their form. They are 
as follows: 



adj. 


adjective Hind. 


Hindu 


Ang. 


Anglicized as, anglice It. 


Italian 


cf. 


compare Mex. 


Mexican 


Eng. 


English plu. 


pliu-al 


Fr. 


French sing. 


singular 


Ger, 


German Sp. 
subst. substantive 


Spanish 



a (article), unstressed a, 

stressed a. 
a' (Scot.), 6. 
Aachen, i'CHgn. 

Aaron, A'ron. 

British usage prefers A'dron, 
the second a not really a separate 
syllable, but a transition sound 
between the a and r. 

abacus, S,b'^kfis. 

k bas (Ft.), i'bi'. 

ab'Stis. 

V abattoir, abitw&r'. 
abbatial, ^bba'shal. 
Ab'diel. 
Sbdd'men. 
Abed'nSgo. 

abeigh (Scot.), abeCH'. 
Abercromby, ab'erkrSmbJ. 
Aberdeen, ab^rden'. 
Abergavenny, ab'firgivgn'i, 

ab'erggn'I. 

V aberrant, llbgr'Siit. 
abject (adj.), ftb'dzSkt; 

(verb meaning cast 
off), abdzekt'. 
ablaut, Sblout; (Ger.), ap'- 
lout. 



Abou ben Adhem, i'boo 

b6n &'dSm. 
Abou (Abu) Hassan, i'boo 

has'dn. 
Aboukir, ibooker'. 
abracadabra, ab'rfi,k&d4b'- 

r&. 
abread (Scot.), abred'. 
abrogate, ib'rogat, ab'- 

r6g&t. 
abrogative, 5<b'rogat)(v. 
Abruz2d, ibroot'se. 
absent (adj.), Sb'sSnt; 

(verb), S-bsgnt'. 
absinthe, fib'slnth; (Fr.), 

absent'. 

absolute, Sb'sfiliut. 

absolutely, ^b's61iutliJ. 

absolutory, 3<bs6riut6ri. 

absolve, abs51v'. 

Ahzolv' is allowed by the Ox- 
ford and other dictionaries, but 
it is seldom heard in the United 
States to-day. 

absorb'. y 

abstemious, Sbstem'Ius.v 

The Oxford Dictionary gives 
dbstem'iuSf in which the i scarce- 
ly makes a syllable. Compare 

ale, senlite, cAre, &t, accord, arm, ask, sofa, lov4ble, eve, ivent, 2nd, recent, 
there, ovftr, Eden, ice, ill, old, 6bey, 6rb, cSffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 
ohr, iu=u in use, dm, up, circus, menii, f66d, fd&t, out, oil, apgle. part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH «= Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 16-20. 

3 



24 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



British military with American 
militaryy British intWest with 
American interest, seeming to 

Eoint toward a greater contrast 
etween stressed and unstressed 
syllables in the British than in 
the American pronunciation. 

^abstract (adj.), Sb'strakt; 
(verb), ^-bstrSkt'. 
The common mispronimcia- 
tion of this and abstractlyy and 
kindred words, the omission of 
the t, is usually due to lack of 
lingual agility rather than to 
ignorance. Practise the light 
touch of the tongue first for the 
palatal then for the dental con- 
sonant in quick succession. In 
abstractly, American pronuncia- 
tion tends to a fairly even accent 
on the first two syllables, though 
the dictionaries put the primary 
accent on the first. British 
usage puts the stress rather 
strongly on the first syllable. 

abstruse, Sbstroos'. 

Abu (name of a mountain), 

S,boo'. 
See also Abou. 
abutilon, abiu'tfl5n» 
abut'mSnt. 
Abydos, Abydus, ibi'dSs, 

Sbi'dus. 
abysm, S-bizm'. 
acacia, ak'ashia. 
academe, Sk'adem; (Brit.), 
ak'adem. 
The fact that the second a has 
the^ sound in academy (where it 

&Ie, senate, cl^re, St, accord, arm, gsk, 
there, ovftr, Eden, ice, fll, old, 6bey, drb, 



is stressed) might seem an argu- 
ment in favor of the British 
pronunciation. 

academician, akSd'emi'- 

shiin. 
accent (noun), Sk'sSnt; 

(verb), SksSnt'. 
acceptable, aksSpt'abl. 

The Oxford Dictionary allows 
also dk'sSptabl, not usually recog- 
nized by American dictionaries. 

access, Sk'sgs. 

Practically all American dic- 
tionaries prefer this to akses', 

accessory, 3JksSs'6ri. 

Ak^s^sM, is preferred in Brit- 
ish usage, and is historically 
preferable, but has fallen al- 
most entirely into disuse in the 
United States. 

acclimate, Skli'mat. 

acclimated, 5,kllm'it§d. 

accolade, ^olad', JkoIM'. 

accompaniment, akiim'- 

panJment. 

accompt, akount'. 

Accompt, an archaic form of 
account, has disappeared from 
the spoken language, and exists 
as a written or printed form 
meaning account in the sense of 
a money reckoning, 

accomptant, akount'ant. 

See accompt. 
accordion, akor'dion. 
accost, akSst'. 

sofS, lovable, eve, ivent, end, recent, 
cofifee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



25 



accouchement, akoosh'- 

mkh. 
The French pronunciation is 
preferred by American diction- 
aries. Anglicized pronuncia- 
tions, dkoosh'mentf akotich'mSnt, 
are allowed by the Oxford Dic- 
tionary. 

accoucheur, fikooshor'. 
accoutre, Skoo'tSj*. 
accrue, Skroo'. 
accurate, Sk'iurSt. 
acephalous, Ssfif iltis. 

acerbate, Ss'^rbat. 

American dictionaries give the 
same form for verb, adiective, 
and past participle. The Ox- 
ford Dictionary gives ds^'hat as 
adjective and past participle. 

acerbity, Ss^r'tltl. 

acetanilide, &s'5tS.n'nid ; 

(Brit.), fe'gtan'nid. 

acetate, is'fitat. 

acetic, &set'ik. 

AMlk is also allowable, but 
most dictionaries prefer the first 
pronunciation, presuinably to 
distinguish the word in speech 
from ascetic (ds^t'lk), 

Achaean, 3,ke'3,n. 

Achates, dkat'ez. 

Acheron, Sk'erSn. 

Achilles, fikU'ez. 

acme, Sk'mS. 

acom, a'k6jTi. 

The pronunciation d/MfUy still 
allowed by some dictionaries, 



would be the normal modern 
equivalent of the Anglo-Saxon 
form of the word (which has 
been distorted by supposed con- 
nections with oak and com)^ but 
it is not in good use. 

acoustics, Skoos'tiks, 

ikous'tJks. 
acquiesce, fik'wJSs'. 
across, ftkros. 

Some American dictionaries 
eive dkrdSy but this is seldom 
heard in current speech. 

acrostik, &kr6s'tJk. 
Actseon, ftkte'Sn. 
actor, ak'tor. 
acumen, akiu'mgn. 
adagio, id&'dzJfo. 

The i should be so lightly pro- 
nounced as to make the io prac- 
tically one syllable. 

SdSmante'Sn. 
adamantine, ^.dimSn'tin. 
adaptation, ftdapta'shtln. 
address, ^dr6s' (both nounv^ 

and verb), 
adduce, Sdius'. 
adgpt'. 

adhesive, Sdhe'^v. 
Adige, i'dedza. 
ad infinrtiim.V^ 
adipose, ^d'ipos. 
adjectival, adzSkti'vS,!. 

Some dictionaries give also 
dd'^ktlvU. 



bhr, iu = u in use. am, iip, circiis, menQ, fo6d, f36t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH*GerW. ich, h (Fr.) m(m. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



26 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



adjectively, Sd'zektivli 
ad lib'itum. 
Adme'tus. 
admirable, ad'mirabl. 

Admirable Crichton. 

See Crichton. 
admiralty, ad'miralt!. 
ad nauseam, ad noshSSm. 
adobe, ado'bi, ado'be. 
Ad5'nis. 
A'drian. 

adscititious, adsiti'shtis. 
adulation, adiula'shun. 
adiilt'. 

advance, advans'. 
adventure, advgn'tiur. 
adverse, M'vers. 

So the dictionaries say, but 
the Oxford notes that ''poets 
have accented both ad 'verse 
and adverse'." Probably we do 
so also unconsciously in speech, 
according as the sentence modu- 
lation brings one syllable or the 
other at the crest of a wave. 
We might, for example, speak 
of "ad'verse cir'cumstances," 
but accent the word differently 
in such a clause as ''to expect' 
a decis'ion adverse' to himself'/' 

advertise, S-dV^rtiz, ^d- 
vertlz'. 
American usage seems to be 
evenly divided between the two 
ways of pronouncing this word. 
The fact seems to be that most 
of us stress both the first and 



last syllables so that the hearer 
cannot tell which we mean for 
the primary and which for the 
secondary stress. 

V\ advertisement, adv^rt'- 

izment, advertiz'ment. 

The Oxford Dictionary gives 

only the first. Most American 

dictionaries prefer the second, 

but give both. 

ae (Scot.), a. 

^neas, ene'Ss. 

iEolus, e'ftlus. 

aerate, a'erat. 

sere perennius, e'rfe peren'- 

ius. 

ae'riSl. 

aerie, e'eri. 

British usage prefers d'eri, 
which is allowed but not gener- 
ally preferred by American au- 
thorities. It is the same word 
in whatever form, aery^ eyrie, 
eyry. 

a'eriform. 

The Oxford Dictionary gives 
only e'erifdrm, 

aerolite, a'erolit; (Brit.), 

e'erolit. 
aeronaut, a'eronot; (Brit.), 

e'eronot and e'er6n6t. 
aeroplane, a'eroplan. 
Aerschot, ar'sk5t. 
aery (etherial), a'eri; 

(Brit.), e'eri. 
aesthesia, esthe'sia. 



ale, senate, c^re, at, accord, arm, ask, sofa, lovable, eve, Svent, end, recent, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, ^r\^^ c§fifee, §^d. connect, lemdn, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



27 



aesthete, es'thet. 

British usage allows also 
es'thet, 

aesthetic, Ssthgt'Ik. 
aestival, Ss'tivdl. 

Ssdv'al is also allowed, but 
it is not preferred by modern 
authorities. 

aes triples, es tri'plgx. 

aethling. 

See athling. 
affaire d'amour, Af&r' 

d&moor'. 
affaire d'honneur, S-ffdr' 

d6nor'. 
affaire du coeur, &ff&r' dii 

kor. 
affluent, M'looSnt. 
Afghanistan, afg2,n'Ist&n. 
aforesaid, afor's6d. 
a fortiori, a forshio'ri. 
A'gag. 
again, agSn'. 
against, SgSnst'. 
Agamemnon, Sgam6m'n6n. 
Aganippe, aganip'6. 
Agape, Sg'Spg. 
agaric, a'g^rik. 

Agd'rik is also allowed, but 
the first is preferred by modern 
dictionaries. 

Agaricus Campestris,agar'- 
ikus kampes'trfs. 



agave, agav'S. 

In the southwestern states 
where the word is applied to 
the American Aloe, it is often 
pronounced dgdv'cLy doubtless 
through Spanish influence, 
though the word, as a common 
noun, comes into English from 
the Greek through the vocabu- 
lary of botany. 

aged (of advanced age), 

a'dzSd; (of or at the 

age of), adzd. 
agee (Scot.), adz6'. 
Agesilaus, S^dzSsna'iis. 
agglomerative, agl5m'^ra- 

t!v. 
aggrandize, Sg'rfindiz. 
aggrandizement , SgrSn'- 

dizmgnt. 
agile, ^dz'il. 

The Oxford Dictionary gives 
also dd'^j which is not recog- 
nized by most American dic- 
tionaries. 

Agincourt, &'zankoor'. 

Some authorities recognize an 
Anghcized form, a'd^inkdrt. 

agley (Scot.), agli', agle'. 

In Burns' To a Mouse, this 
word is rhymed with joy; doubt- 
less Bums would have pro- 
nounced it dglV and rhymed joy 
with it. In the eighteenth cen- 
tury the oi sound rhymes with 
i, as it does often in German: 

"Das dringt in die Weite 
Wie Glokengelaute." 



oAr, iu=u in use, Arn, iip, circus, menii, f66d, fd&t, out, oil, aijgle, part, thin, 
tliat, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



28 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



agrippa, agrip'S. 
agronomy, ^gr5n'6mi. 
aguardiente, a'gwardien'tt. 
The g should be sounded very 
lightly. 

Aguascalientes, a'gwaskal- 

yen'tas. 
Aguecheek, a'giuchek' 
Agulhas, 3.gool'y^s. 
Ahasueras, Shaz'iuSras. 
Ahithophel, ahith'ofel. 
Ahriman, S,'rim3.n. 
aide de camp, ad'dS kdmp'; 

(Fr.), ad'de k6n'. 
aiguille, agwel'. 
ailantus, alan'tQs. 
aileron, a'lSrSn; (Fr.), al'- 

r6n. 
ailment, al'ment. 
airn (Scot.), arn. 
airt (Scot.), art. 
Aisne. 

The pronunciation of this 
word is something between an 
and driy as if one should begin 
to say an and end with dn. Some 
gazetteers give dn and some dn, 
but neither represents the French 
pronunc: "iion, and the word has 
not been Anglicized. 

Aix, aks. 

Aix la Chapelle, aks'li 

sh^pel'. 
Ajaccio, ay^t'cho. 

ale, senite, ciLre, at, accord, Srm, 3sk, 
thgre, ov6r, Edfen, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



akward (Scot.), ok'wert. 

arabastSr, alab^s't^r. 

a la belle etoile, a la bel' 

atwal'. 
a la bonne heure, a la bftn' 

or. 
a la frangaise, a 15, fransaz'. 
A'lamo. 

a la mode, a la m8d'. 
a Tanglaise, k longlaz'. 
alas'. 

albeit, olbe'it. 
albino, albe'no, albi'no. 
albumen, albiu'men. 
alcalde, alkal'de; (Span.), 

alkM'da. 
Alcantara, alkan'tS,ra. 
alcazar, alkazar'; (Span.), 

§,lkath&r'. 
Alceste, wisest'. 
Alcestis, ^ises'tls. 
Alcinous, alsin'Sus. 
Alcoran, alkoran'. 
Alcyone, alsi'fini, alse'ona. 
Aldebaran, aldeb'arS^n. 
Aidemey, ol'd^raS. 
Aldine, ol'din. 
Alexandrine, alegzan'drin. 
algebraist, al'dzebra'ist. 
Algol, al'gSl. 
Algonquian, alg5n'kiS,n. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, Snd, recSnt, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



29 



Algonquin, SlgSn'kin. 
alguazil, algw5,zel; (Span.), 

algwathel'. 
Alhambra, 3,lhfim'bra. 
Ali, a'le. 

alias, a'Uas, a'lias, S'liSs. 
aribi. 
a'lien. 

alienate, a'Hgnat. 
Alighieri (Dante), &legya'- 

re. 
allegiance, Sle'dzins. 
allegorist, ^l'Sg6rist. 
allegro, Sla'gro. 
allenarly (Scot.), Slgn'&rll. 
Allenstein, i'lgnshtln. 
allopathy, ai6p'3,thi. 
allude, Sliud'. 
ally, 3,li' (both noun and 

verb). 

Alma Mater. 

Dictionaries give dVma mSL't^, 
but in academic circles, where 
the word is most often used, it 
is conunonly pronounced dV- 
ma md/t^, 

Alma-Tadema, S'lmS, tSd'- 

SmSr. 

ahnond, a'miind. 

American dictionaries allow 
also dl'mUnd, 

almoner, Sl'miiner. 

almost, 61'most, olmost'. 

bhr, iu=u in use, Am, up, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, aqgle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, ft (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



almous (Scot.), 6'miis. 

alms, S,mz. 

aloe, a'lo. 

A'lost. 

alpaca, SlpSk'lL. 

Alpheus, arfSus. 

Alpine, Sl'pJn. 

British usage prefers dVptrif 
which is allowed but not pre- 
ferred by American authorities. 

Alsace, Msas'. 

also, 61'so. 

The Oxford Dictionary gives 
dVso, and suggests dl'so with a 
question mark. Some Ameri- 
can dictionaries allow dVso. 

altaz'imuth. 

altercation, Slterka'shfin, 

olt^rka'shiin. 
al'ter e'go. 
alternate (adj. and noun), 

m^fn&t, Slter'nat; 

(verb), artemat, 51'- 

teraSt. 
aluminum, Sliu'mlfniim. 
alved'lar, Sl'vSolar. 
alveolate, SlVeolat, alve'- 

tm. 

always, ol'waz, ol'wSz. 

am'adis. 

Amalekite, amSlek'it. 

So we are told to pronounce 
it, but practice, so far as there 
is any, tends toward dm&V^kit. 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



am'Sranth. 

amateur, Smater', am'- 

atSr'. 
This word has undergone 
some vicissitudes in establishing 
itself in English. Such sounds 
as dmaliur and dmdtoor are not 
now recognized by most dic- 
tionaries or by careful speakers. 

ambergris, am'bergres. 

Ambrose, am'broz. 

ambrosia, S^mbro'ziS,, am- 

bro'zia. 
ambulatory, am'biulat6r]f ; 

(Brit.), 5,m'biulat6ri. 

ameliorate, amel'JSrat. 

amen, a'men, S.'mSn. 

In speech usually the first; 
in singing almost invariably the 
second. 

amenable, amen'^bl. 
amende honorable, amS-nd' 
6n6rabl'. 
In the eighteenth century, 
when dueUng brought this term 
much on the popular tongue, it 
was Anglicized in pronunciation. 
Now it is regarded as French. 

amenity, amen'iti. 

Amherst, am'efst. 

Amiens, Smyan'. 
Sometimes Anglicized as 

&m'Uns, 

amour, amoor'. 
amour propre, iLmoor' 
pro'p'r. 

ale, seniite, cftre, ^t, accord, lirm, Ssk, 
thSre, ovfir, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



amperage, amper'&dz, 2,m- 

per'Sdz. 
Ampere, S,npdr'. 
ampere, am'per, Sm'per. 
amphibrach, am'fibrak. 
Amphion, amfl'on. 
amphitheater, amflthe'- 

ater. 
amphora, am'f6ra. 
anachronism, anak'ronizm. 
anacoluthon, ^nakoliu'- 

th5n. 
Anacreontic, SnakrS6n'tik. 
anacrusis, 3,nakroo'sis. 
anaemia, ane'mid. 
anaesthetic (anesthetic) , 

finSsthgt'ik. 
anaesthetize (anesthetize), 

^nSs'thStlz. 
analogous, an5,r6gus. 
analogousness, S-nal'Sgiis- 

nes. 
analogy, &nSl'6dzL 
analysis, S^narisfe. 
AnSni'Ss. 
anapaest, Sn'apgst. 

The Oxford Dictionary gives 
also du'dpest, and some Ameri- 
can authorities give dn'oL-past, but 
these are seldom heard to-day. 

anastigmatic, anSs'tigmat'- 
ik. 

sofa, lovlible, eve, event, Snd, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



31 



ancestral, ^nsSs'tral. 

Anchises, anki'sez. 

anchor, Sn'kor. 

anchovy, Sncho'vJt. 

An'chdvi is allowed also by 
some authorities. 

ancien regime, Sn'sySn 

razem'. 

ancient, an'shSnt. 

ancillary, Sn'sfl5,ri. 

Andaman', Sn'dam&n. 

andante (It.), &nd&n'ta. 

The Anghcized pronunciation 
dnd&n'th is allowed by some 
dictionaries. 

andantino, indante'no. 

andiron, Snd'iArn. 

Androcles, 5,n'dr6klez. 

Also spelled Androdus {dn'- 
drdklUs). 

androgynous, Sndr5dz '- 

inus. 
Andromache, SndrSm'akS. 
Andromeda, ^ndr5m'fedS,. 
Andronicus (Greek), ^ndr6- 

ni'kus; (Eng.),andr6n'- 

ikus. 
The second is Shakespeare^s 
pronunciation: *'To gratify the 
good Andronicus." 

anecdotal, ^nekdot'il. 

an^mom'eter. 

aneuch (Scot.), SniuCH'. 

aneurysm, ^n'iurizm. 

ohr, iu = u in use, Am, up, circus, menu, food, fd6t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, ix (Ft.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



anew, aniu'. 
Angelina, andzeli'nS. 
Angevin, an'dzevlfn. 
angina, an'dzinS, ^ndzi'nft. 
angina pectoris, an'dzJnS. 

(or andzg'n^) pSk'- 

t6ris. 
Anglican, Sn'gUk^n. 
Anglice, an'glisS. 
Anglicize, ^n'glfeiz. 
Angouleme, angool&m'. 
angular, Sn'giular. 
aniline, Sn'ilin, ^n'llin. 

An'iten is also allowed, but it 
is seldom heard. 

animadversion, & n K m & d - 

v^r'ziin. 
animalcule, Snimal'kiul. 
anima'to. 

annihilate, Sni'hflat. 
Anjou (Fr.), inzoo; (Ang.), 

Sndzoo'. 
annunciate, Snun'shiat. 
annus mirabilis, Sn'us 

mfr^b'ilis. 
anomalous, ^n5m'dliis. 
anonymity, ^nomm'itL 
anonymous, anSn'imus. 
Anopheles, an5f'Slez. 
ant, Snt. 
Antseos, Antaeus, Snte'us. 



32 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



antarctic, SntS-j-k'tik. 

See abstract, 
antediluvian, antfediliu'- 

vian. 
Sntepeniilt', antSpfe'nult. 

The first is preferred by most 
authorities; the second is a com- 
paratively modern pronuncia- 
tion that gains ground as we 
forget our Latin. 

Anthony, ^n'tflni. 

See also Antony, 
anthropophagi, SnthropSf- 

S^dzi. 
anti- (prefix), ftn'tl- 

In some compounds the t is 
stressed, as in anti'phonal, 

Antig'inS. 

antimony, Sn'ttmonl. 

British usage allows dnUlmiini, 
antinomy, Sntin'Smi. 
Antm'6us. 
antiphlogistic, fintlfl6dzis'- 

tik. 
antiphonal, Sntif'&n&l. 
antipodes, intlp'fidez. 
antitoxin, Snt!t5ks'In. 
Antium, Sn'sMiim. 
Anton'io. 
Antony, Sn'toni. 

This is the English fonn of 
the classical name Antonius. 
As an English name (without 
reference to Latin) it is com- 
monly spelled Anthony, and 

ale, sen&te, cllre, &t, accord, irm, 3sk, 
th^re, ovfir, Edfen, ice, l\\, old, obey, 6rb, 



pronounced in the same way 
as Antony, 

antonym, Sn'tonim. 
Ant'werp. 

The French form, AnverSj is 
pronounced dnvdr', 

anxiety, SnzI'StJ. 
anxious, Sn'kshtis. 
Apache. 

Properly a'pd/che, doubtless as 
an Anglicized pronunciation of a 
Spanish transliteration of an 
Indian name; now most com- 
monly Americanized as dpdch'e 
or dpdch'L 

Sper'i?nt. 
apex, a'pSks. 
Aphrodite, Sfrodit'S. 
apices, a'pJsez, 2,'pfaez. 
k pied, k pya'." 
apocalypse, 5,p5k'alips. 
Apocrypha, 4p6k'r!f&. 
ap6d'6sis. 
Apollyon, Sp51'i5n. 
apologue, Sp'615g. 
ap6si6pe'sis. 

There are secondary stresses 
on the first and third syllables. 

a posterio'ri. 
apostle, apfts'l. 
apothegm, Sp'SthSm. 

Also spelled apothem and pro- 
nounced as above, both forms 
being variants of apophthegm, 

ap6the'5sis, SpStheS'sis. 

sofS, lovable, eve, ^vent, end, recent, 
coflfee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



33 



appanage, Sp'anSdz. 

apparatus, Sp^ra'ttis, S-p- 

S,ra'tus. 
The first is preferred by most 
American sj>eakers, but the 
second is the favorite with the 
dictionaries. 

apparent, Spdr'Snt. 

appellate, dp^'at. 

This is the common adjective 
or substantive. The rare verb 
is pronounced dp'ildt. 

appendices, ipSn'dlsez. 

appendicitis, Spgndisit'Is. 

appoggiatura,ap6d?atoo'ra. 

apposite, fip'dsit. 

appreciation, ipreshia'- 

shiin. 

apprentice, Sprgn'tfa. 

approbative, Sp'robaUv. 

Apremont, &prem5n. 

apricot, ap'rikSt. 

Dictionaries agree on this, 
though dp'rikSt is widely ac- 
cept^ in the United States. 

a prid'ri. 

A fyred'rt is now widely ac- 
cepted also. 

apron, a'priin, a'ptlrn. 

Apdm is sometimes con- 
demned as a corruption. The 
fact is, it is no more corrupt 
than any other form of the word. 
It comes from the Old French 
naperouy and appears as napron, 
napruny and apurriy in the fif- 
teenth century. **In English, 
initial n has been lost by cor- 



ruption of a napron into an 
apronJ^ — Oxford Dictionary. 

k propos de rien, & pr6p5' 
d6 ryto'. 
Apropos has become thor- 
oughly at home in English with 
the sound dprdpd\ 

aptitude, Sp'titiud. 

aqueduct, Sk'widiikt. 

Aquila, ^.k'wilft. 

aquiline, SkVilln, ak'wilin. 

Ar'Sb. 

Arabic, fir'S^Wk. 

Arachne, Srfik'nS. 

arachnoid, Srak'noid. 

Ar'ai. 

Arapahoe, arSp'^ho. 

arMfrSmgnt. 

arbitrative, if-'bitratlv. 

ar'bitratof. 

Arblay, d' dir'bla. 

Srba'r^ai. 

Srbore'tum. 

arbutus, irbiu'tiis. 

archseopteryx, irk66p'- 

tfiriks. 

archaic, irka'ik. 

archaism, 5,r'kaJzm. 

archangel, &rkan'dzel. 

Archangel (Russia), 3<rkan'- 

dzel. 
The Russian form , A rkhangelsk, 
is pronounced drCHdn'd^lsk. 



6hr, iu»u in use, <irn, iip, circus, menu, food, fdot, out, oil, apgle, part, thin* 
y»at, a^ure, CH«Qerm. ieh, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



34 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



archbish'op. 
archetype, ark'etip. 
archidiaconal, arkidi2,k'- 

6nai. 
archiepiscopal, 5,rkiep!s'- 

kSpal. 
archilowe (Scot.), ar'kilo. 
archimage, ^.r'kimadz. 
Archimago, arkJma'go. 
Archimedean, S,rkimed'6an, 

arkimSde'dn. 
archipelago, arkipel'Sgo. 
-^ architrave, &r'kitrav. 
archival, 5,r'klv&l. 
arctic, 3,rk'tlk. 
See abstract. 

Ardennes, ardgn'. 

Ardois, S^rdwa'. 

arduous, ir'diuiis. 

a'rga. 

are'6lS. 

ar$6m'6ter. 

Areopagite, arfe6p'4dzit. 

ArSop'Sgiis. 

Ar'gand. 

Argenteuil, irzantti'yS. 

Argentine, ar'dzSntin. 

Argive, Sr'dziv. 

Argonne, apgSn'. 

ale, senate, cAre, It, accord, Srm, ask, 
thgre, ovftr, Eden, ice, Jll, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



argumentum ad hominem, 
argiumSnt'um ad h5m'- 
inem. 
Ariad'nS. 
Ar'ian. 

In this form the word usually 
means a follower of the doctrine 
of Ariusj in which sense it is 
pronounced as here indicated. 
When it means Indo EuropeaUy 
most commonly spelled Aryan j 
it is pronounced usually dr'ydn, 
but sometimes dr'ldn, 

A'riel. 

Arimanes, Srlma'nez. 

Ari'6n. 

Arios'to. 

Aristides, &ristid'ez. 

aristocrat, ^ris't6krat. 

Aristophanes, arist5f'Snez. 

Arkansas, ar'k^nso. 

Aries, arl. 

Some authorities allow an 
Anghcized sound, drlz, 

aries (Scot.), arlz. 
Arl6n'. 
arma da. 

Armentieres, annantydr'. 
armistice, ar'mistis. 
aromatize, Srom'atiz. 
arpeggio, ^.rpedz'yo. 
arquebuse. 
See harquebuse. 

sofa, lovable, eve, Ivent, <5nd, recSnt, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemdn, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



35 



arraign, Sran'. 

Arras, krSiS^ 

arras, ar'3,s. 

arrear, arer'. 

Arretium, ^re'shium. 

arrierepensee,&ryar'p6nsa'. 

arrondissement, arondes- 

mon'. 
arsenic, ir'snJk. 
Artaxerxes, irtdks^r'ksez. 
Ar't^gSh 
Artemido'riis. 
Ar'temfe. 
artificer, irtif 'isfif. 
ar'tisSn. 
Artois, 5,rtw&'. 
Arundel, Sr'todSl. 
Arvira'gus, Srvir'agtis. 
Ar'y^, 3,r'iin. 
Cf . Arian. 

Asbes'tos, Szbgst'os. 
Ascanius, Sskan'Ws. 
Ascham (Roger), ^'k3,m. 
Asclepiad, Sskle'pKM. 
Asclepiades, fcklepi'Sdez. 
Ashby de la Zouch, Ssh'bl 

d§ la zooch. 
Asia, a'za. 
Asiatic, azJSt'ik. 
askance, llskSns', fekSns'. 



asklent' (Scot.). 

Asm6dS'us. 

aspar'agus. 

Aspasia, aspa'zlft, aspa'- 

swa. 

asperity, asp^r'it!. 
asphalt, Ss'f^lt. 
Asphodel, 3,s'f6dSl. 
aspir'ant, as'pirant. 
Asquith, fis'kwith. 
assay, 3^a'. 

Properly so pronounced in 
whatever sense it is used. 

assets, Ss'Sts. 

assignat, Ss'ignat; (Fr.), 

asenyi'. 
assize, Ssiz'. 
associate, 5^6'shlat. 
assoilzie (Scot.), ^soil'yJ. 

The z in this word represents 
an old letter j (yod) which has 
disappeared from our alphabet. 
It was something like a conso- 
nant y. It made * * hquid " (mou- 
1116) an n or i which it followed, 
as in assoUjie. When printers 
began to use the z to represent 
it, it came to be pronounced as 
z, though some words, chiefly in 
Scots, and proper names still 
show traces of the older letter. 
Mackenzie is sometimes locally 
pronounced Mackingiey and some 
families of Dalziels have reverted 
to DalyeU. 

assuage, Sswadz'. 



ohr, iu=u in use, Arn, iip, cirdSs, menQ, food, fd6t, out, oil, ai^gle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH=Germ. ic/i, ii (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



36 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



assumption (Am.), asiimp'- 
shtin; (Brit.), ^sum'- 
shQn. 
assurance, Sshoor'ans. 
Astar'tS. 
asthma, Sz'ma. 

This is the common pronuncia- 
tion in the United States. Vari- 
ous authorities, however, allow 
also &s'mdi dst'mdi and dsth'md, 

As't61at. 

astrakhan, fis'trakin. 
astrography, SstrSg'rafl. 
astronomic, ^str6n5m'ik. 
Astrophel, Ss'trfifgl. 
asymptote, Ss'imtot. 
asyndeton, SsIn'dfetSn. 
atavism, St'SvIzm. 
ate, 6t, at. 

Formerly, and still in Eng- 
land, commonly pronounced St. 
At is now widespread in the 
United States. The change is 
probably due to the influence of 
the written and printed form 
with the spread of literacy. 

atelier (Fr.), Stelya'. 
Atheling, ath'Un. 
Athelstane, Sth'glstin. 
Athe'nfe. 

The Latin form, Athe^nd, is 
commoner. 

Athene (e'um) tiiim. 
athlete, Sth'let. 



atlSnte'an. 

at'om. 

atour (Scot.), ato'6r. 

At'rSiis, a'troos. 

A'tri. 

attache, dt^^ha'. 

attar, ^'tar. 

Attila, at'M. 

attitude, St'itiud. 

attribute (subst.), St'ribiut; 

(verb), atrJb'iut. 
attune, Stiun'. 
aubade, ohkd\ 
Aube, ob. 
auberge, obdrz'. 

The r should be slightly gut- 
tural in the French pronuncia- 
tion. American dictionaries 
sometimes give the sound of this 
word as dbdrd^', indicating the 
belief that it has been Ameri- 
canized — ^not Anglicized, for the 
Oxford Dictionary gives it as 
above. 

Aubert, obdr'. 
Aubervilliers, obSrveya'. 
Auchinleck, 5CHinlgk', 

6'CH]tnl6k, aflek'. 
aucht (Scot.), 6CHt. 
Auchtermuchty, 5CHter- 

muCH'ti. 
au contraire, 6 c6ntr&r', 
au courant, o coorin'. 



ale, sen&te, o&re, It, Sooord, Srm, 8sk, sofS, Iov6ble, eve. ^vent. Snd, recent, 
thSre^ oy6r, Edin, ioe, HI, old, 6bey, 6rb, cSffee, odd, o6QneGt, lem6n, 5 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



37 



audacious, oda'shus. 

Audrey, 6'dri. 

au fait, o fa'. 

Aufidius, ofid'iiis. 

auf wiedersehen, ouf ve'- 

d^rza'^n. 
Augean, 6ge'an. 

augur ) 

These two words are pro- 
nounced alike, but derivatives 
from the second, augury, inau^ 
guratCj and the like, have the 
iu sound of u, 

au grand serieux, 6 grkh 

sfiryo'. 
au gratin, o gritSn'. 
Augustovo, ougoosto'vo. 
aximous (Scot.), 6'miis. 
au naturel, o nitiirgl'. 
aunt, ant. 
aureola, 6re'61a. 
au revoir, 5 revwS,r'. 
auricular, orik'iular. 
Auriga, ori'ga. 
aurist, 6'rist. 
aurora borealis, oro'ra 

borSa'lis, borSa'lfe. 
Aurungzebe, oriinzeb'. 
auscultation, oskulta'shun. 
Auster, 6'ster. 

6hr, ia«u in uae, <irn, ttp, circfis, menfl, f55d, f5St, oat, oil, a^gle, part, thin, 
tbat, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich^ h (Ft.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



authority, othSr'itL 
auto de fe, 6'to dS, fa'. 
Autolycus, otsrikus. 
autonomy, 6t5n'6mJ. 
autopsy, 6't6ps!. 
Auvergne, ov6m'y\ 
auxiliary, ogziryari. 
ava (Scot.), avo', 5,va'. 
avant courier, avant koo'- 
rJer. 
Anglicized (more or less) from 
thje French pronunciation dvdn 
koorid\ 

AvStar'. 

American dictionaries prefer 
dvdtdf. 

avaunt, avont', dvS^nt'^ 

avenue, av'eniu. 

aver. 

aver (Scot.), a'ver. 

averse, avers'. 

aversion, aver'zun. 

Avfl'ion. 

Avlo'na. 

avoirdupois, Sv'^rdfipoiz'. 

AVon. 

awa (Scot.), awo', awa'. 

awkward, ok'wSrd. 

awmous (Scot.), 6'miis. 

awry, ari'. 

axiom, a'ksiQm. 

Ayacanora, lakanS'ra. 



38 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



aye (meaning yes), i; 

(meaning always), a. 

Both words are sometimes 
spelled ay J but pronounced as 
here indicated. 

Ayesha, i'esha. 

Aylmer, a'imer. 



Aymer, a'mef. 

Ayr, ar. 

Ayrshire, ar'sher. 

Aza'zel. 

azote, a'zot; (Brit.), azot'. 

az'rael. 

azure, a'zer, a'ziur. 



ale; sen&te, cAre, at, accord, arm, Ssk, eofS, lovable, eve, ivent, JSnd, recent, 
there, ovftr, Ed6n, ice, Kll, old, obey, drb, cSffee, odd, oSnnect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



B 



bak- 



bagatelle, bagatel'. 
Bagdad, bag'dad. 
Bagehot (Walter), badz'8t. 
bagnio, ban'yo. 
Bagot (Sir Charles), bag'- 

ut; (Canada), bago'. 
bahadur, baho'door, baha'- 

door. 

Baikal, blk^l'. 

Bailleul, bayol'. 

bain marie, ban m3,rfe'. 

baim (Scot.), bam, bem. 

Balaam, ba'lam. 

Balafre, bMafra'. 

Balb5'a. 

The full name as pronounced 
in Spanish is Vds'ko nun'ydih da 
hdlbo'dy Vasco Nunez de Balboa. 
The V is bilabial, something be- 
tween b and v. 

baldachin, bal'dakin. 
Balder, bol'der. 
Balfour, bSl'foor. 
balk, baulk, b6k. 
Ballantrae, bSUantra'. 
ballet, b^ria'. 
balm, bam. 

ohr, iu = u in use, tm, iip, circils, menu, f55d, fd6t, out, oil, aQgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH«=Germ. ich, h (Ft.) men. See complete key, pages 15-20. 

4. 



Ba'al. 

ba'boo (babu). 

baccarat (baccara), 

ara'. 

So given in American diction- 
aries. The English prefer 6aMrd', 
which approximates the French 
pronunciation. 

bacchant, bak'ant. 

Masculine noun and adjective. 
"With a bachant air." 

bacchante. 

Most commonly (in the United 
States, at least) bdkdn'tl, seem- 
ingly after the Italian baccante. 
Often bdkdnt'j the French pro- 
nunciation. Sometimes b&Wdnt, 
like bacchant, of which it is the 
feminine form. 

Bach (Germ.), bItCH. 
bacillus, basil'us. 
Badajoz, badahoth'. 
bade, bad. 

Baden Powell, bad'en po'Sl. 
badinage, b&denaz', bad'- 

inadz. 
Badroulboudour, b&drool- 

boodoor'. 
Baedeker, ba'deker. 



40 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Balmoral (Castle), bal- 
mor'al. 
So pronounced, also, as a com- 
mon noun (name of a fabric, a 
boot, a cap). 

balow, ba'lo, ba'loo. 

balsam, bol'sam. 

balsamic, bolsam'ik, bal- 
sam 'ik. 

Balthasar, baltha'zar, b5,l'- 
tkzaf. 

Balzac, bal'zak'. 

Said to be Anglicized as 
hdVzdk. 

ba'nal, ban'al. 

The Oxford Dictionary gives 
ban' at first; American diction- 
aries prefer h&n'dl. It is often 
heard with the French sound 
bdn'dV. 

bana'na, ban&'na. 

The dictionaries seem to pre- 
fer hdnd'nd; the people prefer 
hdnd'nd. 

bannock (Scot.), bSn'ok. 
Banquo, ban'kwo, bSn'ko. 
bap (Scot.). 
Barabbas, barab'Ss. 
Barbados, barba'doz. 
Barbarossa, b^rblirSs'a. 
barcarole, b^r'karol. 
bardie (Scot.), b3,rd'i. 
Bardolph, b&r'd51f. 
Ba'ring. 
ba'rium, ba'rium. | 

ale, senate, cftre, St, accord, Snn, ask, 
there, ovSr, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, drb, 



Bar'kis. 

Bar-le-Duc, bar'Ie diik'. 

Barmecide, bar'misid. 

bar'6net. 

So also bar'onetagej har'onetcy, 
baroque, barok'. 
barouche, baroosh'. 
barquentine, bar'kenten. 
barrace (Scot.), bar'as. 
barrage, bar'adz, bap'riz'. 

This word, pronounced hdr'dd?, 
was technical and httle known 
till the development of artillery 
fire in France gave it a new 
lease of life, and brought it with 
its French sound, bdr'rd?\ on 
every tongue. In some verses 
in Punch recently it was so 
rhymed as to indicate the pro- 
nunciation bdr'ddz. The *' Pub- 
lic School Pronunciation" of 
Southern England sounds it 
hdr'd^j or bdrd^'. 

Bartholdi, b^rtdlde'. 

basalt, basolt', bSs'olt. 

bas bleu, ba bio. 

bashaw, basho'. 

Earher form of pasha, 
bashi bazouk, bash'i ba- 

zook'. 
Bashkirtsev, bashkert'sgf. 
basic, bas'ik. 
basil, baz'il. 

The proper name, Basil, is 
pronounced either bdz'U or bd'ztl. 

bas'ilar. 

sofa, lovable, eve, Ivent, l?nd, rednt, 
coffee, odd, connect, lem6n, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



41 



b§ss§'ni5. 

bassee, La, Ik basa'. 

bass relief. 

See bas relief. 
Bastien-Lepage, b&sty5,n' 

l^paz'. 
Bastille, bastel'; (Fr.),bas- 

te'y'. 
bastion, bSs'tion, bSs'chon. 

bath. 

Authority can be found for 
hath, hdthy and bdth. If other 
gradations of the vowel could 
be represented, doubtless they 
would have their adherents. 
Bdth will pass muster anywhere. 

bathetic, bathSt'ik. 
bat'on; (Fr.), biton'. 
battue, batti'. 

This is the only pronunciation 
universally recognized, though 
an early quotation rhymes the 
word with view. One American 
authority gives bdtiu\ 

Batum, batoom'. 
bauch (Scot.), b6CH. 
baudrons (Scot.), b6'dr\inz. 
baukie (Scot.), b6'kl. 

baulk. 

See balk. 
bausond (Scot.), b6's6nd. 
Bayard (Fr.), b^y^r'; 
(Ang.), ba'y3,rd, some- 
times bi'^rd. 
bayganet (Scot.), bag'net. 



bayonet, ba'8n6t. 
Bayonne, bayon'. 
bayou, bi'oo. 
Bayreuth, biroit'. 
beatitude, be^t'itiad. 
Beatrice (Eng.), be'atris; 

(It.), baatre'cha. 
Beatrice Cenci, baS-tre'cha 

chenche. 
Beatrice Portinari, baMre'- 

cha p6rten2,'re. 
Beauchamp, be'cham. 
Beauclerk (Topham), bo'- 

clark. 
Beaufort (North Carolina), 

bo'f6rt; (South Caro- 
lina), biu'f^rt. 
Beauhamais, boama'. 
beau ideal, bo ide'al. 
Beaulieu, bolyo'. 
Beaumarchais, bomS>rsha'. 
beau monde, bo mond'. 
Beauregard (Eng.), bo'rS- 

gard; (Fr.), boregar'. 
beauteous, biut'Sus. 
Beauvais, boVe'. 

The last syllable is a short, 
open a sound, more like a 
stressed ^ than any other Eng- 
lish vowel. 

Beaux esprits, bo'zSspre'. 
beaux yeux, bo'zyo. 



&hr, iu"U in use, dm, \ip, oirc^is, men(i, food, (56t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
lhat> afure, CH^Germ. ich, ft (Fr.) monj @^ Qosxplete key, pages 15-20. 



42 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



/ 



because, b§k6z'. 
Bede, bed. 

When written Baeda, the name 
is pronounced be'dd, 

Bedivere, bed'iver. 
bedi'zen, bSdi'zen. 
Beel'zgbub. 
been, bin. 

Btn is said to be the American 
pronunciation; ben the British. 
The fact is, the more emphati- 
cally, or even clearly, the word 
is enunciated, the more closely 
it approaches ben, 

Beethoven, ba'tovSn. 
befa' (Scot.), bgfo'. 
befliim' (Scot.). 
begoud (Scot.), bSgood'. 
behalf, bshaf. 

American and English authori- 
ties agree on this, while for half, 
at least some American orthoe- 
pists allow hdf. It is safe to 
say that most of the best Ameri- 
can speakers pronounce half and 
the last syllable of behalf in the 
same way, and that way is hdf. 

be'h^moth, sometimes also 

bShe'mSth. 

behint' (Scot.). 

Behn (Mrs. Aphra), ben. 

behoove, bshoov'. 

So pronounced, also, when 
written behove. 

Behring, bering. 

So pronounced, also, when 
written Bering. 

ale, senate, cfire, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ovdr, Ed^n, xce, ill, old, Obey, Orb, 



beild (Scot.), beld. 
bein (Scot.), ben. 
Beirut, baroot'. 
beit (Scot.), bet. 
beldame, bel'dam. 
bel esprit, bel espre'. 
Belfast. 

Belfort (France), belfSr'. 
Belgrade, belgrad'. 

*'An Austrian army, awfully arrayed, 
Boldly by battery besieged Belgrade." 

Bel'ial, bel'yal. 
belive (Scot.), beliv'. 
Belknap, bernSp. 
Bellarmine, bel'armin, bgl'- 

5.rmen. 
belles lettres, bel 16t're. 
Bellini, bele'ne. 
bellows, beroz, bSl'us. 
Beloochistan' (Baluchistan, 

Beluchistan). 

Belshazzar, belshaz'ar. 

belyve (Scot.). 
See belive. 

Benbow, ben'bo. 

beneath, bSneth', bSneth'. 

Bengal, bengol'. 

So also Bengali; but Bengalese 
is pronounced b^ngdles'. 

Bentham, ben'tam, ben'- 

tham. 

Ben venue, ben veniu'. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffeo, odd, cduaect, lem6n, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



43 



Ben Voirlich, b§n vor'- 

UCH. 

Benvol'id. 

benzine, ben'zen, ben'sin. 

In order to pronounce this 
word hen'zeriy one must stress 
the two syllables almost alike, 
as most Americans do. If the 
second syllable has little stress, 
it almost inevitably is pro- 
nounced with the i sound. 
Compare sacrifice, advertise- 
ment, et al. 

Beowulf, ba'Swoolf. 

bequeath, bSkwe^'. 

Beranger, de, de bar^nza'. 

berceuse, bgrsoz'. 

Berenga'ria. 

Ber'esford. 

berg'amot. 

Bergerac, Cyrano de, 

serano de berzerak'. 
Berkeley, berkli, bark'li. 
Berlin'; (Ger.), berlen'. 
Bemhardi, bSrnhar'de. 
Bernhardt, Sarah, sara ber- 

nar . 
There is some sanction for an 
anglicized sound of the name, 
sd'rd bSm'hdrt, but it could hard- 
ly fail to sound provincial to any 
but a provincial speaker. 

Bemstorff, bern'shtorf . 

ber'serk. 

Bertillon, berteyon'. 

ohr, iu=u in use, <irn, iip, circus, menii, food, fd6t, out, oil, at^gle, paj"t, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, h. (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



Berwick (Eng. or Scot.), 

ber'ik. 
Besancon, b^san'son. 
B^sant', bezant', 
bes'tial, bes'chal. 
bestiary, bes'tiSri. 
bestrew, bSstroo'. 
bete noire, bat nwar. 

The French ^ in Mte is an 
open e sound nearer to our d 
than any other single English 
sound, but more as if one should 
try to pronounce d and ^ at 
the same time. 

Bethesda, bSthgz'da. 
Beth'lehem. 

Bethmann-Hollweg, von, 
f&n bat'man hol'vaCH. 
Bethune, batiin'. 
b^tont' (Scot.), 
betroth', bstroth'. 
See also betrothal. 

beuk (Scot.). 

See buik. 
Bewick, biu'Ik. 
bez'ant, bezant'. 
Biarritz, byarets'. 
bibelot, be'blo, bib'Io. 
bibliography, bibli5g'rafi. 
Bicester, bis'ter. 
bicycle, bi'sikl. 
bield, biel (Scot.), beld, bel. 
bien, bein (Scot.), ben. 



44 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



biennial, bien'ial. 

bier, ber. 

bifurcate, bi'Mrkat. 

big'ot. 

bijou, be'zoo, bezoo'. 

bijouterie, bSzoot'eri; (Fr.), 

bezootre'. 
bike (Scot.), bik. 
billet-doux, bilgdoo'; (Fr.), 

beyadoo'. 
binary, bi'nari. 
bink (Scot.), bSnk. 
binocular, binSk'iulSr, bi- 

nSk'iular. 
bino'mial. 
biography, biSg'rafl. 

Note that the first syllable 
is bi in this and similar words, 
hiographery biographical^ biology, 
and others compounded from 
Gr. bios, life. The syllable bi- 
meaning two is sometimes M- 
when unstressed as in binocular, 
biparous, 

bipartite, bip5,rt'it. 
Bimam, ber'nam. 
Bismarck, bfe'm&rk. 
bismuth, biz'mtith, Ws'- 

mtith. 
bitumen, bitiu'men, bit'- 

iumen. 
bivouac, biv'wak, biv'oo^k. 
Bjomson, beyorn'sSn. 

ale, senate, cfire, 8t, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ovftr, Eden, ice, JU, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



blackguard, blag'ard. 
blad (Scot.), blad, blod. 
blae (Scot.), bla. 
blaewort (Scot.), bla'wiirt. 

Blanc, Mont. 

See Mont Blanc, 
blanch. 

blanc-mange, blancmange, 
blam^nz; (Fr.), blah- 
manz'. 
blase, blaza'. 
blaspheme, blasfem'. 

With which compare blas^ 
phem'er, blas'phemous, bias'- 
phemy. 

blast. 

blat'ant. 

blaud (Scot.), bl6d. 

blawart. 

See blaewort. 
bleat, blet. 
Blefuscu, bl^fiis'kiu. 
Blenheim, blen'em. 
blessed, blest, blSs'ed. 

In ordinary speech the -ed 
does not make a separate syl- 
lable. The -ed endings of verb 
forms were once pronounced, 
and have been preserved more 
or less in certain modes of speech 
that observe set forms, as verse, 
and liturgical reading. 

blithe, blitb. 

Some authorities sanction also 
bllth. 

sofa, lov&ble, eve, event, Snd, recent* 
cSfifee, odd, connect, lemon, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



45 



Bloemfontein, bloom'f5n- 

tan. 
Blount, blunt, 
blouse, blouz, blous. 
Bliicher, Bluecher, blti'- 

CHer. 
As a common noun (a type of 
boot or shoe) often spelled 
bliLcher and pronounced hloo'cher, 

blude (Scot.), blud. 
blue, bloo. 

At least one American authori- 
ty insists on hliu, and other au- 
thorities sanction it, though 
giving bloo the preference. Cer- 
tainly hliu is seldom heard in 
the United States, even among 
the most careful speakers. In 
general u does not have the iu 
sound after I preceded by another 
consonant. 

bluid (Scot.), bliid. 
Blumenthal, bloom'6nt3,l. 
Blythe, bli. 

So pronounced by various 
English families bearing the 
name. In the United States it 
is more conmionly hllth or hliih. 
A British authority, Daniel 
Jones, gives Blyth as hllth or hlij 
and Blythe as hllth. 

Boabdil, boabdel'. 

Cf. Bobadil. 
Boadicea, boadise'a. 
Boanerges, boaner'dzez. 
boatswain, bo's'n. 

Bot'swdn is given by the dic- 
tionaries as if it were the "cor- 

ohr, iu = u in use, <irn, up, circus, menu, food, foot, out, oil, aijgle, part, thin, 
that, a^ure, CH = Germ, ich, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20, 



rect" pronunciation of the word, 
and ho's^n is offered as ** nauti- 
cal.'' But is bot'swdn ever heard 
on the lips of any one to whom 
the word has the faintest spark 
of meaning? 

Bob'adil. 
Cf. Boabdil. 

Boccaccio, bocS-t'cho. 
boche, b6sh, bosh. 

The word is not fully natural- 
ized; there is no accepted pro- 
nunciation of it unless it be the 
French (bSsh) . The most plaus- 
ible explanation of its origin is 
that it comes from a nickname 
for the German students in the 
French Lycees. 

bodach (Scot)., bdd'aCH. 
bodle, boddle (Scot.), b6dl. 
Bodleian, b5dle'an, b6d'- 

leSn. 
Boeotian, beo'shan. 
Boer, bo'^r, boor. 
Bohun, boon. 
Boileau, bw5,lo'. 
Boise (Idaho), boi'zft. 
Bois Guilbert, bwS gelber'. 
Bokhara, b6CHa'ra. 
bolero, bola'ro, bole'ro. 

American dictionaries agree on 
boWrOf which represents the 
Spanish pronunciation. But 
when we hear the word at all, 
we are much more likely to hear 
bole'ro, an Anglicized sound given 
as second choice by the Oxford 
Dictionary. 



46 



EVERY-DAY 



Boleyn, bool'en. 

Formerly often written BuU 
len. 

Bolingbroke, bsrinbrook, 

bol'inbrook. 
bol'ivar; (Span.), b&le'var. 
boll, bol. 

Bologna, bolon'ya. 
bolshevik, b51'shevek. 
bolsheviki, b51sheve'ke. 

The proper Russian pronun- 
ciation is said by linguists to be 
bdlsMvtke'j which may account 
for the fact that when a Rus- 
sian is asked how to pronounce 
it, he says something that sounds 
like hdlsMv'tkej stressing the 
second and last syllables nearly 
aUke. The linguist says that he 
pronounces it hdlsMve'k^ when 
speaking English "so that peo- 
ple will understand it/' The 
rest of us may safely follow his 
example, and call it the Angli- 
cized, or Americanized, sound of 
the word. 

bombard, (subst.), b5m'- 
bard, b 6 m ' b S, r d ; 
(verb) , b6mbS.rd', bom- 
bard', 
bom'bast, bom^bSst. 

The second is the old pro- 
nunciation, but modem usage 
prefers the first. 

bombazine, b5mbazen', 
bombazen'. 

So pronounced, also, when 
written bombasine. 



PRONUNCIATION . 

b5'na fi de. V' 

bonally (Scot.), bftna'U. 

Bonaparte, bo'napart. 

The pronimciation bona'pdrt'l 
was common in England during 
the Napoleonic wars, doubtless 
from the Italian form, Buona- 
parte, bwondpdrt'd, but the sound 
here indicated is commonest now 
in English. 

bonbon; (Fr.), bonbon. 
Bonheur, bOnor'. 
bonhomie, b6n6me'. 
bon mot, bon mo. 
Bonnat, bona'. 

bonne, b6n. 

The proper sound for this 
word is about half-way between 
o and u. 

bonne bouche, bSn boosh. 
bonnet, b5n'et. 

Bonneville, b5n'vil. 

This is the American version 
of the French name of the author 
of the Expedition to the Rocky 
Mountains, as at present at- 
tached to various points he 
visited. 

bon soir, bon swar. 

boh-tofi. 

bon vivant, bon vevkn.. 

boor. 

boord (Scot.), berd. 

Bootes, boo'tez. 

booth. 

Lexicographers are almost 
unanimously in favor of booth. 



ale, senate, cSre, at, accord, Srm, ask, sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
there, ov^r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, coffee, odd, connect, lemon, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



47 



but American practice is cer- 
tainly against it. 

boracic, borS^s'ik. 

Bordeaux, bordo'. 

bdr'^al. 

Borghese, borga'za. 

born. 

borne, born. 

borrel (Scot.), b6r'6I. 

bosom, booz'um. 

Some authorities approve also 
bdoz'um, 

Bos'ton. 

Botha, bo'ta. 

Bothwell, b5tfe'w61, bOthr- 

bothy, b5th'L 
Botticelli, bStSchgl'le. 
Boucicault, booseko', boo'- 

seko. 
boudoir, boo'dwar. 
bouffant, bouffante, boof- 

an', boofant'. 
bought, bught (Scot.), 

booCHt. 
Bouguereau, boogero'. 
bouillon, boo'yon, bool'- 

yon. 
bouk (Scot.), book, 
boul (Scot.), bool. 
Boulanger, boolMza'. 



boulevard, bool'evird; 

(Fr.), boolv^r'. 
Boulogne, boolSn'ye. 
boulversment, boolVers- 

man'. 
bounteous, boun'tiiis. 
bounteth, bountith (Scot.), 

boon'tSth, boon'tith. 
bouquet, booka'. 
Bourbon, boor'biin; (Fr.), 

bdorbon; (Kentucky), 

btlr'bun. 
bourd (Scot.), boord. 
bourgeois, boorzwi'. 

As a printer's term, name of 
a size of type, Mrd^ois', 

bourne, born. 

This word (meaning boundary, 
limit) has become more or less 
confused in spelling and pro- 
nunciation with bourney burn, 
meaning brook. 

bourock, bourach (Scot.), 

bdo'ruk. 
bourse, boors, burs, 
boutonniere, boot5nySr'. 
bovine, bo'vin. 
Bowdich, Bowditch, bou'- 

dich. 
Bowdoin, bo'd'n. 
bower (Scot.), boo'er. 
bowie (Scot.), bou'i. 
bowie (knife), bo% boo'i. 

ohr, iu = u in use, <irn, iip, circus, menii, food, fdot, out, oil, aijgle, paft, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ. ich, fi (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



48 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



bowing, bowin (Scot.), 

boo 'in. 
bowkail (Scot.), bou'kal. 
bowman, bouman (Scot.), 

boo'man. 

bowrock. 

See bourock. 

bow't (Scot.), bout, 
boyar, boyard, boySx', boi'- 

Boyesen, boy'6s6n. 

Boz. 

Bozzaris, bots3.r'gs. 

Brabantio, brabSn'shio, 

brlLban'sho. 

brachial, brak'ial, brS-k'Jal. 
So also brachiate, brachiation, 
hrachium. The prefix hrachio 
(hrachio-cephalic, hrachiopodf and 
others) is pronounced hrdk'lo, 

brae (Scot.), bra. 

Braggadochio, brSgado'- 

shio, br^gado'chio. 

braggadocio, brSgado'sUo, 

brS,gado'cMo. 
Spenser formed the word from 
hrag on the model of Italian 
words in -^cckio or -ocdo, and 
very likely, as the Oxford Dic- 
tionary points out, pronounced 
it hrdgddd'klo, 

Brahe, Tycho, ti'ko bri'g. 
Brahma, bra'ma. 

So also Brahmanic, Brahminic, 
Brahmanism, and others. 

ale, senate, c&re, at, accord, Urm, ask, 
thSre, ov6r, Ed6n, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Brahms, brSms. 
braille, bral. 

From the French proper name 
Braille, hra'ye. 

braird (Scot.), brard. 
Brandenburg, brand'en- 

boorCH. 
Brandes, bran'des. 
brand new, brand niu, bran 

niu. 
A few purists are still telling 
us that we must ** pronounce the 
d" in this combination, and that 
bran new is incorrect. It is as 
correct as long good usage can 
make it — at least two hundred 
years old. 

brany (Scot.), bra'ni. 

brass, bras. 

brattach (Scot.), brat'aCH. 

brava'do, brava'do. 

bravura, bravoor'S. 

braw, br6. 

breeches, brich'ez. 

So also breeching, breech-block, 
breech loader, and the like. 

breloque, br^lSk'. 
Bremen, brem'en; (Ger.), 

bra'mSn. 
Brescia, bra'shi. 
Breslau, bres'Iou. 
Brest -Litovsk, brgs+'lyS- 

tofsk'. 
Bretagne, br^tan'y'. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, J5nd, recint, 
coffee, 6dd, connect, lemon, 5 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



49 



broccoli, brSk'oli. 
br6CH'an (Scot.). 
br6CH'it (Scot.), 
brochure, brft'shiir. 
brocked, brockit (Scot.), 

brfikt, brSklt. 
bromide, bro'mid, bro'mid. 
bromine, bro'mJn, brS'men. 
bronchitis, br5nkit'is. 
Bronte, Bronte, brto'tS. 
brooch, broch. 

"The same word as broach ^ 
the differentiation of spelling 
being only recent, and hardly 
yet established. Occasionally 
pronounced brooch" — Oxford 
Dictionary. 

broom. 

broth'el. 

brough, brugh (Scot.), 

brooCH. 
brougham, broo'iim, broom, 

bro'tim. 

"The name of Lord Brougham, 
of which the native northern 
pronunciation was broo'CHUm, 
also brod'fiim and broo'Mm; this 
became in London brod'iim and 
broom. For the vehicle, broom 
was the accepted London pro- 
nunciation, as seen in society 
verses, etc., and is still widelv 
prevalent, especially among el- 
derly people; brod'Hm is some- 
what less frequent; but an ex- 
tensive collection of evidence 
shows bro'am to be now the 

bhr, m = u in use, Arn, up, circfis, menu, f69d, f66t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



Breton, brSt'tln; some- 
times, brift'un; (Fr.), 

breton'. 
The English pronunciation is 
acceptable for Cape Breton, or 
for one born in Brittany (Bre- 
tagne). The name of the paint- 
er, Jules Breton, should have 
the French sound. The pro- 
nunciation bril'iin is set down 
by one authority as *' illiterate,'* 
but is accepted by the others. 

brevet , brgv'gt. 

breviary, brev'iJri. 

brevier, brSver'. 

brew, broo. 

Briand, bre3.n'. 

Brian de Bois Giulbert, 

bre&n de bw3, gelbar'. 

Briar'San. 

Briar'Siis, bri'aroos. 

bric-a-brac, brik'abrSk. 

Written also brio-Or-brac and 
bricabrac. 

bricole, brikol, bri'kdL 

brig'and. 

brigantine, brig'antgn. 

Brindisi, brSn'desS. 

briquette, brSkSt'. 
Also written briquet, 
Brise'is. 
bristle, bris"l. 
brob'dinnag. 

brocatel, bro'katel, br6'- 
katgL 



60 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



most common in educated use. 
Brom is heard from the vulgar." 
— Oxford Dictionary. 

browst (Scot.), broost. 

Bruges, briiz; (Ang.), 

broodz'es. 

brugh (Scot.), brooCH. 

bruik (Scot.), briik. 

bruise, brooz. 

bruit, broot. 

brulyie (Scot.), briil'yi. 

See assoilzie. 
Briinnehilde, briin'ehilde. 
Brunhild, broon'hilt. 
Brunhild, briin'hilt. 
Brunhilde, broonhild'e. 
brusque, broosk, brusk. 
brusquerie, briiskere'. 
brut, briit. 

Brynhild. 
See Brunhild. 

Bryn-Mawr (Wales), brin 
mor', brin mor' ; (Penn- 
sylvania), brin' maf'. 

bubonic, biub5n'ik. 

buccaneer, bukaner'. 

Buccleugh, bukloo'. 

Bucentaur, biusen'tor. 

Bucephalus, biusef alus. 

Buchan (Scot.), buCH'an. 
Aho Buchan-Bullers {-hdbV^s), 
Bucharest, bookarest', biu- 
karest'. 

ale, senate, c6re, St, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov^r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Buckingham, buck'ingam. 
Budapest, bood'&pest. 
Buddha, bood'a, bood'a. 
Buena Vista, bwa'na ves'- 

ta. 
Buenos Aires, bwa'nos 

i'res. 
buffet (cupboard), boofa'; 

(Fr.), bufa'. 

Bug, boog. 

bught (Scot.). 
See bought. 

buik (Scot.), byook, book. 

buirdly (Scot.), biird'li. 

buist (Scot.), biist. 

buit (Scot.), blit. 

buke (Scot.). 

See buik. 
Bukowina, bookftve'na. 
Bulgar, bool'gar. 
Bulgaria, bdolgar'ia. 
Billow (von), fSn bii'lov. 

Sometimes AngUcized as hiu'W, 

bulwark, bdol'wark. 

bumbaze (Scot.), biim'baz. 

Bundesrat (Bundesrath) , 

boon'desrat. 

bun'sen. 

As a proper name, the Ger- 
man pronunciation would be 
bd6n'skn, 

Buonaparte. 
See Bonaparte. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recSnt, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



51 



buoy, boi, bwoi. 

Box is the pronunciation uni- 
versally heard among sailors, 
aiul prevailingly elsewhere, 
i^ 00% suggested by some authori- 
ties, probably represents the 
same sound as, or a shght va- 
riant from, bwoi. 

bure (Scot.), blir. 
bureau, biu'ro. 

"In Great Britain the stress 
is usually on the final syllable." 
—Oxford Dictionary. In the 
United States it is imiformly on 
the first syllable. 

bureaucracy, biuro'krM. V'^ 
British usage sanctions also 
biurdk'rdsi. 

burglar, btifg'lar. 



Burgundy, bfir'gundi. 
burin, biu'rin. 
burlesque, btirl^sk'. 
burro, boo'ro, bur'o. 
burrows-town (Scot.), biir'- 

tis-toon. 
business, Wz'nSs. 
biisk (Scot.), 
butte, biut. 
butterine, biit'^ren. 
byganes (Scot.), bl'ganz. 
Byronic, bir6n'ik. 
Bysshe, bish. 
Byzantine, blfzdn'tin, Mz'- 

fintln, bizfi^n'tln. 



6hr, iu=u in use, dm, up, circus, menfl, food, fd6t, out, oil, ai^gle, part, thin, 
th^t, a^ure, (;U=iGerm, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See camplete key, pages 15-20i 



ca* (Scot.), k6. 
Caaba, ka'abS. 
cabal, kSbal'. 
cabalism, k^b'alizm, 
caballero (Span.), k3,bal- 

yer'o. 
cabaret, k3,b3,ra', kSbara'. 
cabriolet, k^briola'. 
cacao, klika'o, k&kS,'o. 
cachalot, cdsh'alCt. 
cache, cdsh. 
cachet, kasha'. 
cachexia, k^kSx'iS. 
cachinnate, kS-k'inat. 
cachou, kashoo'. 
cacique, kasek'. 
cacoethes scribendi,kSkoe'- 

thez skribSnd'i. 
cacophony, kSk5'f6nI. 
Cacus, ka'kus. 
cadaver, kada'v^r. 
cadaverous, kadSv'^rus. 
cadenza, klLdSnt'sS. 
cadi, ka'di, ka'd!. 
Cadiz, ka'diz ; (Span.) , 

katheth'. 
Cadmean, kSdme'^n. 

ale, senftte, oAre, &t, accord, &rm, Sak, 
thSre, oy6r, Eden, ioe, 111, Old, dbey, drb, 



caduceus, kadiu'sStis. 
Cadwalader, kSdw51'ad^r, 
caecum, se'kum. 
Csedmon, kad'mtin. 
Caen, kkii, 
Caerleon, karle'on. 
Csesarea, sSsare'a, sezare'S,. 
Also written Cesarea. 

Caesarean, Caesarian, sSza'- 

rian. 
caesura, sSziu'rS,, sSsiu'rS,. 
cafe, kafa'. 
cafe-au-lait, kMaola'. 
cafe-chantant, kafa' shan- 

ikxx'. 
cafeteria, kSfSte'riS.. 

So the word is most generally 
written and pronounced, though 
it is sometimes written cafeteria^ 
and pronounced kdfdtdre'd, 

caffeine, kaf'Sin, kaf'feen. 
Cagliostro, di, de k§,lyos'- 

tro. 
cahier (Fr.), kaya'. 
Caiaphas, ka'afas, ki'afas. 
cailleach, cailliach (Scot.), 

kal'yaCH. 
Ca Ira, s& eri'. 

sofa, lovable, eve, ivent, iSnd, recent, 
c5ffee, 6dd, c5ao9ct, leiz)6n, o (Germ.) 



EVEPvY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



53 



caim, kArn. 

Cairo (Egypt), ki'ro; (Illi- 
nois), ka'fo. 
caisson, kas'8n. 
Caius, ka'us. 

The pronunciation of this 
word as the name of Caius Col- 
lege, Oxford, kez or keSj comes 
from the name of the founder, 
John Kay, or Keye, of which 
Caius is the Latinized form. 

calaboose, kSlaboos'. 
Calabria, kSlab'ri^; (It.), 

kalab'rea. 
Calais, k^l'a, kai'is, kSla'. 

The first and second are the 
Anglicized versions of the name 
of the French city; the second 
is the sound of the name of the 
city in Maine; the third repre- 
sents the French sound of the 
name of the French city. 

calash'. 

Calaveras, kSlS,va'ras. 
calcareous, k3,lka'riiis. 
Calchas, k^rklLs. 
calcimine, k^rsimin. 

Also written kalsomine. 
calcine, kilsin', kSl'sin. 
calculate, k5,rkiulat. 

The u has the iu sound in all 
words on this stem; calculable, 
calcvlative, calculator, and the 
Hke. 

Caldecott, kol'dekot. 



caldron, k6rdr8n. 

The spelling cauldron is pre- 
ferred by some lexicographers as 
better representing the history 
and sound of the word. See 
also chaldron. 

calf, kaf, kaf. 

During eleven centuries there 
is scarcely a possible pronuncia- 
tion of this word that has not 
been, at least locally, in use, 
from Half to ckdlf. Lexicog- 
raphers now are almost unani- 
mous for kdf. In practice kaj 
will be found acceptable, either 
on the ranch, where kaf is con- 
sidered an affectation, or in the 
drawing-room, where MJ is 
frowned on as a vulgarism. 

calfs foot, kS;fs foot. 

We are told that we must not 
say kdvs foot. It is not ''incor- 
rect" in itself, but is the plural 
form. If the purist insists on 
talking by the book we might 
remind ham that the jelly is 
undoubtedly made from the feet 
of more than one calf, — it is 
''foot jelly" from calves. 

Caliban, kailbSn. 
Caligula, kSUg'iula. 
caliph, ka'lif, k^'lff. 
caliphate, ksrjfat. 
calisthenics, kSllisthgn'Jfks. 
calk, kok. 

callao, kala'o, kily&'o. 
caller (Scot.), kal'^r. 
calligraphy, kaUg'rafl. 
Calliope, k^li'opS. 

o^r, iu = u in use, <im, iip, circus, menu, food, fd6t, out, oil, a^gle, paft, t!un, 
tfeat, a?ure, CH = Germ. ich, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



54 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Callipyge, kalip'idzS. 
calm, kam. 
calomel, kal'8mel. 
caloric, kal6r'ic. 
^Calpumia, kalptir'niA. 

So pronounced, also, when 
written Calphumia. 

calumet, kal'iumet. 

This, we are told, is the cor- 
rect pronunciation of the com- 
mon noun. Where the word is 
in daily use as a proper noun, 
naming streets, clubs, and the 
like, it is uniformly pronounced 
haViu7mt\ with the first and 
last syllables equally stressed. 

calumny, karumni. 
Calv6, kalva'. 
Calydon, kal'idSn. 
Calypso, kalip'so. 
calyx, ka'lix, kSlix. 
camaraderie, kamMdere'. 
The first and third syllables 
also are stressed, but not so 
strongly as the last. 

Cambrai, kanbra'. 
Cambyses, kambi'sez. 
camel'opard. 
Camelot, kam'S15t. 
Camembert, kamanbdr'. 
Camille, kamel'; (Fr.)> 

kame'y'. 
Camisard, kam'izard; (Fr.), 

kamezar'. 
camomile, kam'omil. 

ale. senSte, dU^, Ht, liooord, irm, Ssk, 
thSre, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, 6ld, 6b©y, 6rb 



camouflage, kamooflaz'. 
camouflet, kamoofla'. 
campagna, kampan'ya. 
campanile, kampanel'a. 

"Most frec[uently pronounced 
as ItaHan {kampdneVd)^ often as 
French {kdmpaneV), but also 
Anghcized as kdra'panU, -41" — 
Oxford Dictionary. 

Camp de Mailly, k3,n de 

miye'. 
Campeche, kampa'cha, 

kampech'i. 
camphor, kam'f^r. 
Canaan, kan'an. 
So also Canaanite, 

canaille, kana'y'. 

This word was more or less 
completely Anglicized in the 
seventeenth and eighteenth cen- 
turies as kdndVf a pronunciation 
accepted by most lexicographers; 
but the word is seldom heard 
now except as a French word 
with the French sound. 

Canajoharie, kanadzohar'i. 

Canandaigua, kananda'- 

gwa. 
canape, kanapa'. 
canard, kanard'; (Fr.), 

kanar'. 
canary, kana'ri. 
candelabrum, k S n d e I a '- 

briim. 
candidacy, kan'didasi. 

softi, lovable, eve, Svent, end, rednt, 
oSffee, odd, connect, lemdn, d (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



55 



Candide, kanded'. 
canine, ka'nin, kanin'. 

Lexicographers prefer the sec- 
ond; ahnost everyone else pre- 
fers the first. 

canna (Scot.), kan'a. 
cannach (Scot.), kan'^CH. 
Cannes, kan. 
cafion, kan'yon; (Span.), 

kanyon'. 
Canonicus, kan5n'ikus. 
Canopic, kanop'ik. 
Canorous, kano'rus. 
Canossa, kano'sa. 
Canova, kano'va. 
cantabile, kanta'bile. 
cantaloup, kSnt'aloop, 

kant'alop. 
The word has a number of 
variant spellings, of which the 
one given above and cantalope 
are now preferred. The pro- 
nunciation kdnt'dlop is common- 
ly used for the form cantalope. 
Cantaloup is preferable histori- 
cally — the word is from Canta- 
lupoj a country seat of the Pope 
near Rome. 

cantata, kantS,'t3,. 
cantatrice (It.), kanta- 

trech'a; (Fr.), k^nta- 

tres'. 
canteen, kSnten'. 
cantharides, kantharldez. 



Canton, (China) kSntSn'; 

(U. S.), kan'tSn. 
Canute, kaniut'. 
canzone, k§<ntso'na. 
caoutchouc, koo'chook, 
kou'chook. 
American dictionaries prefer 
the first, British dictionaries pre- 
fer the second. 

capacious, kapa'shtis. 
cap-a-pie, kap5.pe'. 
Capernaum, k&per'nS,um. 
Capet, ka'pgt, ka'pet; (Fr.), 

kapa'. 
capias, kap'ias, kSp'iSs. 
capillary, kap'ilirl, kSpil'- 

ari. 
Capitoline, kap'itSlin, 

kapit'ftlin. 
capon, kap'on. 
capote, kapot'. 
Cappuccini, kS,p6oche'ne. 
Caprese, kap'ree. 
Caprera, k3;pra'r3,. 
Capri, ka'pre. 
capriccioso, kapretcho'so. 
Capuchin, kap'iuchin. 
Capulet, kap'iulet. 
caput, ka'put, kSp'ut. 
Carabas, kar'abSs; (Fr.), 

karaba'. 
Caracalla, karakal'a. 



ohr, iu=u in use, ilrn, iip, circus, menfi, food, f66t, out, oil, aqgle, part, thin, 
that, a^ure, CH => Germ, ich^ xx (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 

5 



56 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Caraccioli, k3,r5,cho'le. 
Caractacus, karak'takus. 
carafe, karaf. 
caramel, kar'amSl. 
carat, kar'at. 

In ordinary speech the sound 
of this word is indistinguishable 
from that of carrot. Diction- 
aries make the o of carrot en- 
tirely obscure (kar^ut), but leave 
to the second a of carat a vestige 
of the a sound. The lexicog- 
raphers say that the form karat 
is obsolete. If so it is a lively 
ghost. 

Caravaggio, karava'dzo. 
caravansery, karavan's^ri. 
When written caravanserai the 
word is said to be pronounced 
kdravdn' s^rl. Fitzgerald, how- 
ever, thought otherwise: 

** Think, in this battered caravanserai, 
Whose portals are alternate night and 
day, 
How Sultan after Sultan in his 
pomp, 
Abode his appointed hour, and went 
his way." 

carbine, kar'bin. 

carbonaceous, karb6na'- 
shiis. 

Carbonari, k^rbSna're. 

carburetor,carburetter, car- 
bureter, kS,r'biuret^r. 

Carcasonne, kS-rkSsSn'. 

cardamine, k3,rdam'ini, 
k&r'damin. 

carditis, kardit'is. 

pie, senate, c&re, at, accord, Srm, Ssk, 
thgre, ovfer, Eden, ice, ill, old, dbey, Arb, 



Careme, karam'. 
Carency, karanse'. 
caret, ka'ret, ka'ret. 
Cf. carat. 

Caribbean, karibe'an. 
caribou, kar'iboo. 
caricature, kar'ikatiur. 
caries, ka'riez. 
Carlovingian, karlovin'- 

dzian. 
Carlsruhe, karls'rooe. 
Carlyle (Thomas), karlil'. 
carmine, kar'min, kar'min. 
camelian, karnel'ian. 
carnival, k&r'nival. 

camivora, k5,rniv'6ra. 
So also carnivorous, 

Carolingian, karOlin^ziSn. 

Carolinian, k^r61in'ian. 

carotid, kar5t'id. 

Carranza, karan'zS,. 

Mexican pronimciation does 
not call for the th sound of c 
and z as does the Spanish. 

Carrara, kara'ra. 
carriage, kar'ridz. 
carrousel, karoozel'. 
carse (Scot.), kars, kers. 
Cartagena, kartadze'nfi, ; 

(Sp.), kS^rtaha'na. 
carte blanche, kart blansh. 

sofa, lovable, eve, invent, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



57 



carte de visite, Mrt dS 

viset'. 
cartel, k&r'tel. 

Kdrt^V, the earlier pronuncia- 
tion, is now allowed also by 
some modern authorities. 

cartilaginous, k^rtilSdz'- 

inus. 
cartouche, kartoosh'. 
Caruso, kS^roo'zo. 
caryatid, kariat'id. 

So also caryatides {4dez). 
Casaba, kS-sa'bS;. 
Casabianca, k^sabiank'a. 
Casa Guidi, ka'zS gwe'de. 
Casaubon, kilsd'bon; (Fr.), 

kazobon'. 
Casca, kas'kS,. 
caschrom (Scot.), kas'- 

CHrom. 
casein, kas'ein. 
caseous, kas'Sus. 
casino, k&se'no. 
cask, kask. 

Cassandra, kasS,n'dr&. 
cassava, kasa'va. 
casserole, en, 5,n kaserol' 
cassimere, ka'simer. 

One of the various forms of 
the word now most commonly 
written cashmere, 

Cassiopeia, kMope'yS. 
Cassius, kash'iis. 

bhr, 5u=u in use, Am, ttp, circfis, menu, fSod. fd6t, out, oU, aijgle, pa|i;, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH^Germ, ich, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



cassowary, kS.s'6wS.rL 
Castalia, kastal'iS. 
Castellamare, kastSl&m5,'"» 

ra. 
castigate, kas'tigat. 
castile, kas'tel, k^stel'. 

Although named from the 
Spanish province where it was 
originally made, Castile', castile 
soap was early called castle soap, 
and the word is often heard to- 
day with the stress on the first 
syllable, whereas the proper 
noun has it on the second. 

Castilla, kasteryS. 
castle, kas'^l. 
Castlereagh, kas'lra'. 
Castor, kas'ter. 
casualty, kaz'iualti. 
casuist, kaz'iuist. 
casus belli, kas'iis bel'i. 
catachresis, kat&kre'sis. 
catacomb, kat'akom. 
catafalque, kat'afalk. 
catalepsy, kSt'lllepsi. 
catalogue, kat'^lSg. 
catalogue raisonne, 

al5g rS,z&na'. 
catalpa, katai'plL. 
catamaran, k5,t&marSn'. 
catastasis, kS^tSs'tS-sis. 
catastrophic, k5,tastr5f'ik. 
catechumen, katSkiu'men. 



kat' 



58 



EVEKY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



cateran (Scot.), kat'eran. 
cater-comered, kat'er-k6r'- 

nerd. 
cathedra, kathed'rS, 

kathed'rS,. 
Catherine de Medici, kath'- 

erin da mad'eche. 
cathode, kath'od. 
cathodic, kathod'ik. 
ca'thro (Scot.), ka'thrS, 

ko'thrS. 
Caucasian, koka'shun, 

koka'shun. 
Caucasus, ko'kasus. 
cauld (Scot.), kod. 
cauldrife (Scot.), kod'rif. 

causeway, koz'wa. 

This is not the same word as 
causey (kd'zi), an embankment, 
but is the way on the causey or 
causey-way; hence, a paved way 
or highway, 

cavalero, kavale'ro. 

Cavaliero is also so pro- 
nounced; both are less com- 
pletely AngUcized forms of cav- 
alier. 

Cavalieri, kavMyd'rg. 
Cavalleria Rusticana, kS^va- 

l&re'S, roostika'nSr. 
cavatina, kavate'iift. 
caveat, kav'Sat. 
cave canem, ka've ka'ngm. 

ale, senate, c&re, St, accord, Srm, ask, 
tlicre, ov6r, Eden, ice, Jll, gld, Sbey, Orb 



Cavell (Edith), kavel'. 
caviar, kaviar. 

This word has fluctuated wide- 
ly in the past, both in form and 
sound, and is by no means 
stable to-day. The sound repre- 
sented here is generally accept- 
able now, but not necessarily 
the only acceptable one. 

cavil, kav'il. 

Cawein (Madison), kawin'. 
cayenne, kaen', kien'. 
Cayster, kais'tSr. 
Cayuga, kayoo'ga. 
cayuse, kiyoos'. 
Cecil, se'sil, se'sil. 
Cecilia, sSsil'ia, sSsil'yS. 
Cecily, ses'ili. 

This is perhaps the common- 
est form of a name that is almost 
infinite in its variety of spellings 
— Cicely, Cidly, Cisily, Sicily, 
It is almost universally (however 
it is spelled) pronounced in three 
syllables with the vowels rather 
obscure, approaching i. Oc- 
casionally, however, the spelling 
affects the sound; there are 
those who insist on pronounc- 
ing Cicely in two syllables with 
the i long (i) in the first. 

Cecrops, se'kr5ps. 
Cedric, sed'rik, ked'rik. 
Cedron, se'dron. 
celandine, serandin. 
Celebes, sgl'Sbez. 
celestial, sgles'chlLl. 

sofa, lovable, eve, Svent, ^nd, recent, 
cpff^^, g4d| coftn^Qtf lewOn, ci (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



59 



Celestine, sel'estin, sel'- 
estin, seles'tin. 
As the name of a mineral, the 
word is commonly pronounced 
in the first way indicated here. 

Celia, sel'ia, sel'ya. 
celibacy, seribasi. 

One or two authorities allow 
also sSlib'dstj but no one ever 
says it. 

cellar, sel'er. 

Cellini, Benvenuto, bSn- 

vanoo'to chSle'ne. 
cello, chel'o. 
Celt, selt. 

Pronounced K^lt when so 
spelled. 

cement, sement'. 

The pronunciation s^m'M is 
given by all lexicographers, and 
preferred by many, but it is 
seldom heard in ordinary speech 
in the United States. 

cemetery, sem'eteri. 
Cenci, chen'che. 
Cenis, Mont, mon sene'. 
centenary, sen'tSnarL 
centrifugal, sentrif iugal. 
centripetal, sentrip'ital. 
cephalic, sSfal'ik. 
Cephas, se'fas. 
Cepheus, se'fius, se'fSus. 
ceramic, sSram'ik. 

Sometimes written keramic 
and pronounced keram'lk. 

bhr, iu=u In use, Am, iip, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, apgle, part, thin. 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, h (Ft.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



cerate, sS'rat. 

Cerberus, ser'beriis. 

cerebral, ser'Sbral. 

cerebrate, ser'febrat. 

cerebric, sere'brik. 

cerebro-spinal, ser'febro- 

spi'nal. 

cerebrum, ser'ebrum. 

cerement, ser'ment. 

Note that in words beginning 
with cere-, those that come from 
Lat. cerebrum {cerebration^ cere- 
bro-j et. al.) have the first syl- 
lable pronounced sSr-; whereas 
those that come from Lat. ceraj 
wax, (cerecloth, cerement, et al.) 
as well as those that come from 
Lat. Ceres (cereal), have the first 
syllable pronounced ser. 

Ceres, se'rez. 

cereus, se'rSus. 

cerise, serez'. 

certain, ser't'n, ser'tin. 

certes, ser'tez, ser'tiz. 

Occasionally found in older 
poetry as a monosyllable. 

certie, certy (Scot.), ser'ti. 

certiorari, sershiOra'rL 

certis (Scot.), ser'tis. 

cerulean, serool'San. 

ceruse, se'roos, sSroos'. 

Cervantes, therv5,n'tas ; 

(Ang.), servan'tez. 

Cervera, therva'rS,. 



60 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



cervical, s^rVikal. 

cesare (logic), se'zarg; (It. 

name), chaz&'ra. 
cess (Scot.), ses. 
c'est-a-dire (Fr.), se'tader'. 
ceteris paribus (Lat.), set'- 

gris par'ibiis. 

Cetinje, tset'Snya. 

Cevennes, saven'. 

Chablis, shable'. 

This is the only acceptable 
pronunciation for the word. 
But what did Browning have in 
mind when he wrote: 

" In doors went I, and brought out a 
loaf, 
Half a cheese, and a bottle of 
Chablis; 
Lay on the grass and forgot the loaf 
Over a jolly chapter of Rabelais"? 
(Garden Fancies, II.) 

chacun k son gout (Fr.), 

shakun'na son goo^ 
chafe, chaf. 
chaff, chaf. 
Chagres, ch2,'gr6s. 
chagrin, shagrin', shagren'. 
The first is preferred in Amer- 
ican usage; the second in British 
usage. 

chaise, shaz. 

Hohnes's title, "The One 
Hoss Shay," represents New 
England dialect in two words 
out of four. 

chalcedony, kalsgd'oni, 
kal'sfedoni. 

ale, senate, dire, lit, accord, lirm, Ssk, 
there, ov6r, Edfen, ice, ill, old, 6bey, 6rbi 



Chalcis, kM'sis. 

Chaldean, kalde'an. 

Chaldee, k^l'de, kalde'. 

chalder (Scot.), ch61'der, 

cho'der. 

chaldron, chol'dron. 
See also caldron. 

chalet, shala', shalS', sha'la, 

chalice, cha'lis. 

challis, sha'li, chal'is. 

Chalons, shalon. 

Chdlons-sur-Mame {-sur mam) 
and Chdlons-sur-Sadne (-sur son), 

chalybean, kalibe'an. 

Cham, kam. 

Variant of Khan (Ghengis 
Khan, Kuhla Khan) . The Oxford 
Dictionary calls Cham obsolete. 

chamberiain, cham'berlin. 

chambre de luxe, chS^n'bre 

de liiks. 
chameleon, kamel'ian. 
Cham fer. 
Chaminade -Carbonel, 

sh&menad'-karb6nel'. 
Chamisso, shameso'. 
chamois, sham'i, sham'oi, 

shamoi'; (Fr.), sham- 

wa'. 

Many speakers use one sound 
of the word for the name of the 
animal, and another for the 
leather made from its skin. 
Thus, in reading Manfred we 

sofa, loviible, eve, event, i^nd, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



61 



might speak of the shdmwd 
hunter, and at another time, of 
poUshing metal with shdm'i skin. 

Chamonix, shamone'. 

A variant is_Chamouni, pro- 
nounced shdm6dne\ 

Champagne (Fr.), shM- 
pan'ye. 
The word is, of course, Angli- 
cized as the name of a kind of 
wine {shdmpdn') . 

champaign, shampan'. 

British authority is in favor 
of the older sound chdm'pdn. 

Champ de Mars (Fr.), shM 

de mars, 
champignon, champin'yun; 

(Fr.), sh^npenyon'. 
This word has long been 
AngUcized. It occurs early (six- 
teenth century) as champion, 
later as champinion, 

Champigny, chanpenye'. 
Champs Elysees, shanza- 



chance, chans. 
chancery, chans'eri. 
chan'dler. 
Chan'dos. 
chanson, shanson'. 

Various American authorities 
aUow an AngUcized sound, shdn'- 
s6n; but the word is not often 
heard on the vulgar tongue, and 
most of those who use it now 
give it the French sound. The 
Oxford Dictionary gives only 



the French pronunciation, but 
a-mong the citations is DaniePs 
line, **His holy Chanzons fitted 
to their String" (1639), in which 
it would seem at least to be 
stressed on the first syllable. 

Chantecler, sh§,ntcler'. 

The English form, chanticleer, 
is pronounced chdnt'lkUr. 

Chantilly shanteye'. 

As the name of a kind of lace 
this is Anglicized as shdntiVl. 

chaos, ka'6s. 

chaparajos (Mex. Span.), 
chap&ra'hos. 
In the United States, the gar- 
ment is known as chaps or shaps 
where it is used. 

chaparral, chSp'aral. 
chapeau bras, shapo'bra'. 
chaperon, shap'^rSn, shap'- 

eron. 
Chapultapec, chapoolta- 

pek'. 
char, chare, chS,r, chAr. 
charade, sharad'. 

British usage prefers shdrdd'. 

charge d'affaires, sh3,rza' 

daf^r'. 
charivari, sha'rivS;'rL 
Charlemagne, shar'leman ; 

(Fr.), sharleman'ye. 
Charleroi, sharlerwa'. 
Charlevoix, sharlevwS;'. 



ohr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, fo6d, f66t, out, oil, apgle, paft, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



62 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



charlotte russe, sh&r'I5t 
roos'; (Fr.), sharlot' 
rtis'. 
Charmian, char'mian. 
Charon, ka'r5n. 
Chartres, shart'r'. 
chartreuse, sh5,rtr6z'. 
Charybdis, karib'dis. 
chasseur, shasor. 
chassis, shas'is, shas'S. 

The word originally meant 
framBj and gives us the word 
sash{es) as applied to windows. 
Then it was applied to the 
frame and running gear of guns 
as a technical term, and pro- 
nounced sM'st. With its new 
popularity it has gone back to 
something like its earlier Angli- 
cized sound; it occurs in the 
form chasses in the seventeenth 
century. 

chastise, chastiz'. 
chastisement, chast'izment. 
chasuble, chas'iub^. 
chateau, shato'. 
Chateaubriand, shato- 

brean'. 
chateau en Espagne, shato' 

anSspan'y\ 
chatelaine, shat'^Ian; 

(Brit.),shat'Slan;(Fr.), 

sh2.telan'. 
Chatham, chSt'em. 

ale, senSte, cftre, at, accord, arm, §sk, 
th€re, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, 5ld, 6bey, 6rb, 



Ch^tillon, shatey6n'. 

Chaucer, ch6's6r. 

chauffeur, shofor'. 

Chautaqua, sh&t6'kw&, 
chato'kwa. 

chauvin, shovan'. 

chauvinism, sho'vinizm. 

chef, shef. 

chef d'oeuvre, shedo'vr'. 

Chekhov, cha'kSf. 

Chelsea, chel'sg. 

Cheltenham, chel't'nam. 

Chemin des Dames, sha- 
man' da dam'. 

Chemnitz, kem'nits. 

Chemung, shemung'. 

chenille, shSnel'. 

Cheops, ke'5ps. 

Cherbourg, sherboor'. 

cherchez la femme, shersha' 
la fam. 

cheroot, shSroot', chSroot'. 

Cherubini, karoobe'ne. 

Cheshire, che'shSr. 

chestnut, ches'niit. 

cheval de frise, shSv&l'd^ 
frez'. 
Usually used in the plural, 

chevaux de frise, shSvo d^ jre'z, 

Frisian cavalry, a defense said 

to have been used by the 

Frisians as defense against cav- 
alry attack. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, rec?nt, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



63 



cheval glass, sheval' glas. 
chevalier, shevaler'; (Fr.), 

sheval'ya. 
chevelure, sheveliir'. 
Cheviot, chev'iot. 
Chevy chase, chev'i chas. 
Cheyenne, shien'. 
Chejme (Walk), chan, chin, 
chianti, k§an't6. 
chiaroscuro, kyarfiskoo'ro. 

Sometimes chiar(H)scuro (kyd'^ 
ro-dskoo'ro,) 

chic, shek. 

Characterized as slang by the 
Oxford Dictionary, and as col- 
loquial by American dictionaries. 

Chicago, shiko'go. 
chicanery, shikan'eri. 
Chi'chester. 
chield (Scot.), chel. 
chiffonier, shif5ner'. 

Also spelled chiffonnier. 
chignon, shenyon'. 
Chihuahua, chewa'w^;. 

childe, child. 

Of the word child in this / 
sense the Oxford Dictionary 
says, "A youth of gentle birth: 
used in ballads and the like as 
a kind of title. When used by 
modern writers, commonly 
spelled chylde or childe for ^dis- 
tinction's sake." This use of 
the word is archaic. 

Childeric, chil'derik; (Fr.) 
(Child^ric), sheldarek'. 



chil'dren. 

Chill. 

Makers of gazetteers tell us 
that when the name is spelled 
Chile, it should have the Span- 
ish sound, che'ld. The distinc- 
tion is seldom made in every-day 
usage. There is a province in 
China the name of which is 
spelled chili or chihli and sounded 
che'le, 

Chillicothe, chilic6th'g. 

Chillon, sheyon' 

Some authorities accept an 
Anglicized sound, shtldn. 

Chilperic, chil'perik; (Fr.) 

(Chilp^ric) , shelparek'. 

chimera, kime'ra, kime'ra. 
So also chimerical. 

chimpansee, chimpSn'ze, 

chimpanze'. 
Chinese, chinez', chInes^ 
Chingachgook, chingak'- 

gook, chingS-ch'gook. 
Chinook'. 

Chippewa, chip'Sw^;. 

Sometimes spelled Chippeway 
and pronounced chip'ewa. 

chirography, kirog'raff. 

chiromancy, ki'romansi. 

chiropodist, kirop'Sdist. 

chirurgeon, kirAr'dzen, 

chirur'dzen. 
A modern pronunciation of an 
archaic word. 

Chisholm, chiz'um. 



bhr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, food, fd6t, out, oil, a^gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ. ich, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



84 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Chiswick, chiz'ik. 

Chittim (Bible), kit'im. 

chivalric, shiv'alrik, 

shival'rik. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

chivalrous, shiv'alrus. 

Chloe, klo'g. 

choler, kdl'Sr. 

choleric, k51'erik. 

Cholmondeley, chum'li. 

Chopin, shopan'. 

Not to be confused in sound 
with the common nouns chdp'in 
and chopine {cho'pen'). 

chough, chQf. 
Chrestien de Troyes, kra- 
tyan' de trwa. 
Also spelled Chretien but pro- 
nounced as here indicated. 

chrestomathy, krestSm'- 

atM. 

Chriemhild, krem'hflt. 

So pronounced, also, when writ- 
ten Kriemhild, but when either 
form has a final e, it is sounded 
i'Mlde). 

christen, kris"n. 

Christmas, kris'mfe. 

Chronos, kr6n'6s, kron'Os. 

Chryseis, krise'is. 

chrysolite, kris'Slit. 

chrysoprase, kris'Opraz. 

ale, senate, c&re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
thSre, ovSr, Edin, ice, ill, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



Chrysostom, kris'ostom, 

krisos'tom. 

Cibber, sib'er. 

cicada, sika'da. 

cicatrice, sik'atris. 

So also Matrix, the scientific 
equivalent of cicatrice. 

Cicely. 
See Cecily. 

Cicero, sis'ero. 

In the Roman pronunciation 
of Latin, klk'^ro, 

cicerone, chicheron'a, sis- 

feron'i. 
cicisbeo, chechSzba'o, sisJs'- 

bgo. 
Cid, sid; (Sp.), the^. 
ci-devant, se-dSvan'. 
Cienfuegos (Sp.), thean- 

fwa'gos; (Cuban), se- 

anfwa'gos. 
ci git, se dze'. 
ciliary, sil'iari. 
Cimabue, chemaboo'a. 
Cimmarian, sime'rian. 
cinchona, sinkon'lL. 
Cincinnati, sinsina'ti. 
cincture, sink'tiur. 
cinematograph, sinSmat'- 

Sgraf. 
Cinna, sin'a. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, ^nd, recent, 
c5fifee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



65 



cinque cento, chen'kwa 

chen'to. 
cinquefoil, sink'foil. 
Cipriani, cheprean'e. 
circa, ser'ka. 
Circassian, serkash'an. 
Circe, ser's§. 
Circean, s^j-se'S-n. 
circuit, ser'kit. 
circuitous, serkiultiis. 
Cirencester, si'rensester ; 

(colloquially), sis'eter. 

Ciudad Juarez, seoodad' 

hooa'ras. 
In Mexican pronunciation d 
and z are not ordinarily given 
the th sound as they are in 
"Castilian." 

civicism, siv'isizm. 
civilization, siviliza'shun. 

One authority at least allows 
sivilizd'shicn, 

clachan (Scot.), cla'CHan. 

claes (Scot.), klaz. 

clairschach (Scot.), klir'- 

shaCH. 

clairvoyance. klArvoi'ans. 

claise. 
Same as claes (see above). 

claith (Scot.), klath, klith. 

claithing (Scot.), klath'Jn. 

clamihewit, klamihiu'it. 

clandestine, klandes'tin. 

bhr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menu, food, fo&t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
'that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



clangor, kl&ng'^r, klSn'^r- 
clapboard, klab'ord, klSb'- 
erd. 
Kldp'hdrd, which is found in 
the dictionaries, scarcely exists 
in actual use. 

Clapham, klap'em. 
clarinet, klar'inet, klaringt'. 
clarion, klar'ion. 
clarkit (Scot.), klar'klt. 
claught (Scot.), kloCHt. 
claut (Scot.), klot. 
claver (Scot.), kla'ver. 
Cla verhouse, k I a ' v e r ii s , 

kla'vers, kla'vers. 
clavier, kla'vier, klavep'. 
dead (Scot.), kled. 

cleanly (adj.), klen'li. 

The adverb is kUn'U. 
clematis, klem'atis. 
Clemenceau, klamanso'. 
Cleomenes, kle5m'6nez. 
Cleopatra, kleop3,t'ra. 

So in practice, but the dic- 
tionaries prefer kleopdt'rd. 

clepe, klep. 
clerestory, kler'stori. 
cleuch (Scot.), kliuCH, 

klooCH. 
clew, kliu. 
Clichy-la-Garenne, k 1 e ' - 

she-15.-garen'. 



66 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



clientele, klientel, klientel'. 
climacteric, klimak'terik, 
climakter'ik. 
British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

clio, kli'o. 
clique, klek. 
clishmaclaver (Scot.), klish- 

maklaVer. 
cloaca, kloa'ka. 
cloisonne, klwazSna' 
Close (subst. An enclosed 

"place), klos. 
Clotho, klo'tho. 
cloture, klotiir'. 

The word is French, and in 
spite of recent frequency in the 
newspapers has only the French 
sound. So far the American 
pubHc reads it but does not 
pronounce it. 

Clough (Arthur Hugh),kluf. 
clour (Scot.), kloo'er. 
Clusium, klooz'ium. 
Clytemnestra, klitemnes'- 

tra. 
Clytie, klit'i. 
Cnidian, ni'dian. 
Cnidus, ni'diis. 
coadjutant, koadz'iutant ; 

(Brit.), koadziu'tant. 
coadjutor, koadziu'tor. 

ale, senate, ckre at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov6r, £den, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Coahuila, koawe'la. 
coalheugh (Scot.), kol'- 

hiuCH. 
Coblenz, ko'blents. 
cobra, kob'ra. 

cocaine, ko'kan. 

The ordinary pronunciation, 
kdkdn\ is unanimously voted 
colloquial by the dictionaries. 

cochineal, koch'inel. 
cochlea, kok'lea. 
Cockbum (Lord), ko'btirn. 
Cocytus, k&si'tus. 
codify, kod'ifi, kod'ifl. 

In general, American usage 
prefers the first; British the 
second. 

Coeur d'Alene (Fr.), kor' 
dalen'; (Am.), ktir' 
dalan'. 

Coeur de Lion (Fr.), kor' 
d^le6n'. 

cofBn, kof'in. 

coghle (Scot.), ko'CHL 

cognac, kon'yak. 

cognizance, kog'nizans. 

cognomen, kogno'men. 

cognoscente, konyoshen'ta. 

coherence, kohe'rens. 

cohesive, kohe'siv, 

Cohoes, kohoz'. 

coiffeur, kwafor'. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



E VERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



67 



coiffure, kwafiir. 

American dictionaries allow 
also koi'fiuT; some prefer it. 
At least one authority com- 
promises on kwdfUr'. 

coign, koin. 

Practically obsolete except in 
the Shakespearean phrase, 
''coign of vantage." 

Coila (Scot.), koil'a. 
Coke (Sir Edward), kok, 

kook. 
colander, kul'ander. 
colchicum, kSl'Idkum. 
Colchis, kol'kis. 
Colenso (Bishop), kSlen'so. 
Coleridge, kolridz. 
Coligny, de, de kole'nye'. 

The stress should be nearly 
even on all three syllables, & 
anything a trifle more on the 
second than on the others. 

Colin Clout, kSl'in klout. 
collation, kola'shun. 
collieshangie (Scot.), k61i- 

shan'i. 
collocate, kol'okat. 
colocynth, k5I'5sinth. 
Colombian, k6l6m'bian. 
Colon, kolon'. 
colonnade, k516nad'. 
colophon, k51'6f5n. 
colportage, k61'port3,dz, 

k61p6rtaz'. 



colporteur, kSlportor. 

There is an Anglicized form, 
colporter, pronounced kdVportSr. 

Colquhoun, kohoon', ko- 

hoon'. 
column, k5l'um. 
columnar, kolum'nar. 
coma, koma. 
comatose, k5m'atos. 
British usage prefers kom'dtds, 

combatable, kSm'batabl, 
k5mbat'abl. 
The Oxford Dictionary gives 
also hum'hatabl as second of the 
three. 

combative, kSm'bativ, 

k5mbat'iv. 
Comedie Frangaise, k6- 

made' fransaz'. 
Comedie Humaine, k8- 

made' iiman'. 
comedienne, komadSen'. 
comeliness, kum'lines. 
comely, kum'Ii. 
comfit, kiim'fit. 
comfort, kum'fert. 
comfortable, kum'f^rtabl. 
Comines, de, de kSmen'. 
comity, kSm'iti. 
commandant, k5mandant'. 
comme il faut, kum el fo'. 
commendable, k5mend'abl. 



o/ir, iu=u in use, iirn, up, circiis, menii, food, f6&t, out, oil, apgle, paj-t, thin, 
tJi»t, a^ure, QU « Qerw. kA, » (Fr.) mm, Se^ Qomplete key, pages J^3Q, 



68 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



commiserate, kSmiz'erat. 
Commodus, ko'mSdiis. 
commonalty, k5m'6nalti. 
commonweal, k6m'6n wel . 
Originally two words; and 
still properly so in sense of 
common well-being. As such 
there would be as much stress 
on weal as on the first syllable 
of common. But as one word 
it is accented like common^ 
wealth. 

communal, kSm'iunal, 
k5miu'n&l. 
British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. So communalism, -istf and 
others. 

commune. 

In modern English the noun 
is most commonly pronounced 
kdm'iun, and the verb k&miun'j 
sometimes kdm'iun. 

communicative, kOmiu'- 

nikatJv. 
communique, Kfimiineka'. 
communist, k5m'iunist. 
commutate, k5m'iutat. 
commutative, kSmiut'&tiv, 

k5m'iutS.tiv. 
Comorin, k6m'8rin. 
compact (subst.), k6m'- 

p^kt; (adj.), kom- 

pSkt'. 
comparable, kSm'p&rab'l. 
comparative, kSmpar'ativ. 

ale, senate, oftre, at, accord, &rm, ask, 
thSre. oy6r, Edin, ioe, ill, old, dbey, Orb, 



compatriot, kompa'triut. 
compeer, komper'. 
compelled, kompgld'. 
compensate, k6m'pensat, 

kompen'sat. 
compensative, kompen'- 

sativ. 
The London ("Public School 
Pronunciation") is given (by 
Jones) as kdm^pSnsdtlv. This 
pronunciation is often heard in 
America on the lips of good 
speakers, but the dictionaries 
d.0 not sanction it. 

compensatory, kompen'- 

s^tfirf. 
Compiegne, konpySn'y'. 
complaisance, k6m'plazans, 

k5mpla'zans. 
complaisant, k5m'pMzant. 
complex (subst. and adj.), 

k5m'pl^ks; (verb), 
''kompleks'. 
composite, kompSz'it, 

k5m'p8zit. 
compos mentis, k6m'p5s 

men'tis. 
comprador, kSmprador', 

k5m'prador. 
compress (subst.), k6m'- 

pres; (verb), k6mpres'. 
compte rendu, kont randii'. 
comptoir, kontw^r'. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
c5fifee, 6dd, cSnnect, lem6n, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



69 



comptometer, k5mpt6m'- 

Ster. 
comptroller, kontroler. 
compurgator, k5m'purga- 

t^r. 
comrade, kSm'rad, k5m'- 

rad. 
Comte, kont, 
Comus, ko'mQs. 
con amore, k&namo'ra. 
conative, kSn'Stiv, kon'- 

ativ. 
concatenate, konkSt'Snat. 
concave, k5n'kav. 
concentrative, k5nsSn'tr3,- 

tiv. 
concertino, kftnchSrte'no. 
concerto, kSnchgr'to. 
conch, k5nk, k5nch, k5nsh. 
The first is the only one recog- 
nized in British usage; the others 
are often considered provincial 
in the United States. 

concierge, kohsyerz'. 
concise, konsis'. 
conclave, kon'klav. 
conclude, konklood'. 
conclusive, konkloo'siv. 
concord, k5n'k6rd, k5n'- 

k6rd. 
Concord, kSn'kerd. 



concrete, kSn'kret, k5n- 
kret'. 
The first is now generally pre- 
ferred for the adjective, and is 
almost universal for the sub- 
stantive. The second is the 
only pronunciation given to the 
comparatively rare verb. The 
verb meaning to treat with con- 
crete is pronounced kdn'kret, 

concretely, kSn'kretli. 

Kdnhret'U is often heard, but 
it is not sanctioned by the dic- 
tionaries. 

concreteness, kSn'kretn^s. 
concubinage, k 6 n k i u ' - 

binS.dz. 
concubinary, k8nkiu'bi[nM. 
concubine, k5n'kiubin. 
concupiscent, k 6 n k i u ' - 

pisSnt. 
Conde, de, de konda'. 
condign, kondin'. 
condolence, kondo'lens. 
condottiere, k8nd6tty4r'a. 
conduit, k5n'd!t. 
condyle, kSn'dil. 
Confessio Amantis, kon- 

fSsh'io amSn'tis. 
confessor, konfSs'ej*. 
confidant, k6nfldant', kOn'- 

fidant. 
confidante, kSnfidant', 

k5n'fidant. 



bhr, iu = u in use, (irn, iip, circus, menu, food, fdot, out, oil, aijtgle, part, thin, 
that, a^ure, CH = Germ, ich, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



70 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



confine (subst.), kSn'fin, 

konfin'; (verb), kon- 

fin'. 
confirmative, konftir'ma- 

tiv. 
confiscate, kon'fiskat, kon- 

fis'kat. 
conflagration, k5nflagra'- 

shun. 
confluent, k5n'flooSnt. 
confrere, k6nfrar', kSnfrd'r. 
congee, kon'dzS. 

In some older meanings, now 
mostly obsolete, this word was 
once very fully Anglicized with 
this pronunciation. To-day, in 
most senses in which it is used, 
it is usually written congSy and 
pronounced kdn^\ 

congener, k5n'dz§ner. 
congenial, k6ndzen'yal. 
congeries, kondze'riez. 
Congo, kon'go. 
congregative, k6n'gregS,tiv. 
Congreve, kon'grev. 
congruency, kon'grooensi. 
congruent, k6n'grooent. 
congruity, kongroo'iti. 
conic, k5n'ik. 
conifer, ko'nif^r. 
Coniston, k5n'ist6n. 
conjugative, kSn'dzoogS- 
tiv. 

ale, senate, cAre, St, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov^r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb 



conjure, kSn'dzer, kon- 
dzoor'. 
The first is the sound of the 
word meaning to influence as by 
magic; the second, of the word 
meaning imploref and the like. 

conjurer (a magician), 

kun'dzerer; (one who 

implores) , kondzoor'er. 
connate, kSn'at, konat'. 
Connaught, k6n'n6t. 
connoisseur, k5nesor', k6n- 

esiur'. 
connotative, k6no'tS,tfv, 

k5n'6tativ. 
conquer, kSn'ker. 
Conrade, k5n'rad. 
conscience, k5n'shens. 
conservatoire, konserva- 

twar'. 
conservator, kSn'servater. 
conserve, konserv'. 
considerable, konsid'erab'I. 
consignor, konsin'er, k6n- 

sinor'. 
consistory, konsls'tfiri, 

k6n'sist6ri. 
British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

consolatory, kons61'S,16ri. 
consols, konsol'z, k5n's5Iz. 
The first is historically prefer- 
able (as the natural abbrevia- 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



71 



tion of Consolidated Annuities) 
and is the only pronunciation 
recognized by the Oxford Dic- 
tionary. Most other authori- 
ties recognize the second. 

consomme, k5ns6ma', k6n- 

s6ma'. 
consonance, k5n's6nans. 
consonant, kon's6nant. 
consort (subst.), k5n's6rt; 

(verb), k5ns6rt'. 
conspiracy, konspir'isi. 
constable, kun'stib'l. 
Consuelo, kSnsiua'lo; (Fr.), 

konslialo'. 
consuetude, k5n'swStiud. 
consul, k6n'siil. 
consular, kSn'siul^r. 
consummate (adj.), k5n- 
sum'St; (verb), k5n'sii- 

mS,t. 
contemplate, k6n'templat, 

kontem'plat. 
contemplative, k6ntem'pla- 

tiv. 
contemporaneity, contem- 

pftrane'iti. 
contemptuous, k6ntemp'- 

tiufis. 
content. 

As a substantive meaning a 
thing contained this word is 
pronounced kdn't^nt in the 



United States, and honthit' in 
Great Britain. So also the 
plural, contents, of which Lowell 
preferred the British pronuncia- 
tion: 

"An old-fashioned title-page such as 
presents 
A tabular view of the volume's con- 
tents." 

As meaning satisfaction^ the 
word is universally kontSnt^ as 
are also the adjective and the 
verb; witness Browning's line: 

"Oh, I'll content you, — but to-mor- 
row, love." 

Contes de Hoffman, k6nt' 

de hof'man. 
contest (verb), kont^st'; 

(subst.), kSn't^st. 
continuative, kontin'iuStiv. 
contrair (Scot.), kOntr^r'. 
contrapuntal, kSntrSpiin'- 

tal. 
contrariety, kSntr&ri'fet!. ' 
contrarily, kSn'trSrHi, 

k5n'trarm. 
contrariness, k5n'tr^rings, 

kon'trarines. 
contrariwise, kSn'trariwiz, 

k6n'trS,riwiz. 
contrary, k5n'trar]t, k6n'- 

trari. 
contrast (verb), kontrast'; 

(subst.), k5n'trast. 
contretemps (Fr.), k6ntr'- 

tan'. 

ohr, iu=u in use, ilrn, up, circus, menii, food, f66t, out, oil, aqgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 16-20. 

6 



72 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



contribute, kontrib'iut. 
contrite, k5n'trit. 
controvert, k5n'trovert, 

k5ntr6vert'. 
contumacy, kon'tiumasi. 
contumelious, kontiume'- 

lius. 
contumely, k5n'tiumeli. 
contuse, kontiuz'. 
contusion, kontiu'zun. 
conversance, konvers'ans. 
conversant, kSn'versant. 
conversazione, k6nversats- 

eo'na. 
converse (verb), kSnvArs'; 

(subst.), k5n'viirs. 
conversely, kSn'vArsl!, kon- 

vlirs'l!. 
convert (verb), kSnvArt'; 

(subst.), k5n'vtirt. 
convex, kOn'veks. 

convexly, k5n'veksli. 

So stressed by all dictionaries, 
but the Oxford declares that 
''the stress varies." 

convoy (verb), konvoi'; 

(subst.), kSn'voi. 
Conybeare, kiin'Ibdr, k6n'- 

ibdr. 
coomb, koom. 
coop, koop. 

ale, senate, cAre, at, accord, Srm, Ssk, 
there, ovfcr, Eden, ice, ill, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



cooper, koop'er, koop'^f. 

Also, in the sense of a float- 
ing grog-shop or '' bum-boat/' 
spelled cooper or coper j kop^. 
The proper name is pronounced 
as is the common noun. 

co-operation, ko6p6ra'- 

shun. 
Coos (New Hampshire), 
ko'Ss, k65s'; (Oregon), 
koos. 
copeck, ko'pek. 

More often spelled kopeck. 
Copemican, k6per'nikan. 
Cophetua, kofet'iua. 
Copley, kSp'li. 
coppice, kop'is. 
copra, kop'riL, 
copse, k6ps. 
Coptic, kSp'tik. 
copulative, k6p'iul§.tiv. 
Coquelin, koklan'. 
coquetry, ko'ketri. 
coracle, k5r'ak'l. 
coral, k5r'al. 
Cordelier, kordslef'. 
cordial, kor'dzal, kor'dyal. 

British usage prefers the 
second. 

Cordovan, kor'dovan. 

coreopsis, kore6p's3fs, k6- 

reop'sis. 

Corfu, kSrfoo', kor'fiu. 

soft, lovable, eve, Svent, JJnd, reclnt; 
c5ffee, odd, c6nnect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



78 



Corin, ko'rin. 
Corinne, k6rin'. 
Coriolanus, koriolan'us. 
Corioli, kori'81i. 
Comeille, k8rn4y''. 
cornelian, kSrnel'yan. 
Cornells, kSrna'lis. 
comet, kdr'net, kojuSt'. 
cornice, kor'iJs. 
coronach (Scot.), k6r'- 

onaCH. 
coronal, kSr'dnJl, kftro'- 

nal. 
British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

coroner, k5r'6ner. 

coronet, k6r'8n6t. 

Corot, k6ro'. 

corporative, k6r'p6rativ. 

corporeal, korpo'rSal. 

corps, kor. 

The plural, spelled the same, 
is pronounced korz, 

corpse, k6rps. 

Often pronounced kdra, espe- 
cially for poetic or archaic effect. 
The word was originally cors; 
the p crept in from the Latin, 
and at last changed the pro- 
nunciation, but the old pro- 
nunciation is not yet obsolete. 

corpuscule, corpus'kiul. 

The equivalent corpuscle, pro- 
noimced kofp&sl, is the form 
now generally used. 

5Ar, iusu in use, drn, iip, circ(is, menii, food, fd6t, out, oil, ai^gle, part, thini 
tibat, a^ure, CH - Germ, ich, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20, 



corpus delicti, kdj-'ptls 

dSlik'ti. 
Correggio, kSrredz'o. 

Try to pronounce two r's. 
correlate, k5r'felat. 

Dictionaries give kdreldt' for 
the verb, but it is safe to say 
that they do not represent the 
practice of either British or 
American speakers. 

correlative, kSrSl'^tlv. 

corrie, k5r'!. 

corrigenda, kSridzgn'dfi. 

corroborative,kor6b'6r&tiv. 

corrosive, kSros'Iv. 

corrugate, kOr'dogS^t, kOr'- 

iug&t. 

corsage, k6r'sSd?, k6rs5,z'. 

cortege, kortaz'. 

Whether the French word is 
written with e or ^ it is pro- 
nounced the same. Moaem 
usage favors the k 

Cortelyou, k6r't61yoo. 
Cortes, kor'tez; (Sp.), kor- 
tas'. 
Keats gave it the English 
sound: 

*'0r like stout Cortes when with eagle 
eyes 
He stared at the Paoifio — '! 

Cortona, k6rt6'n4. 
coruscate, k6r'iisk8,t, k8r- 
us'kat. 

The Oxford Dictionary recog- 
nizes only the first. 



74 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Corybant, k5r'ibant. 
Corydon, k5r'id6n. 
coryphaeus, korife'us. 
coryphee, kOrgfa'. 
Cosette, kSzet'. 
cosh (Scot.), kosh. 
cosmetic, k5zmet'ik. 
cosmogonal, kSzmog'onal. 
cosmography, k5zm6g'rafl. 
cosmopolite, k6zm6p'61it. 
Costa Rica, k5s'ta re'ka. 
cote, kot. 
coteau, koto'. 
coterie, kot'erg. 

couch'ant. 

Anglicized with this sound as 
a term of heraldry; the French 
sound is kooshdn'. 

couchee, koosh'a, koosha'. 

Coudert, kooda'r. 

cougar, kob'gar. ( 

coulee, koo'li. 

couleur de rose, koolor' de 

roz. 
countra (Scot.), kiin'tri, 

kin'tra. 
countrified, kiin'trifid. 
coup, koo'. 

coup de grace, koo de gras'. 
coup de main, koo de man', 
coup de soleil, koo d6 

s8m'y\ 

ale, senate, cftre, at, accord, Srm, ask, 
thSre, ov6r, Edeo, ioe, lU, old, Obey, Orl?, 



coup d'etat, koo dat^'. 
coup de theatre, koo d^ 

taa'tr'. 
coup d'oeil, koo do'y'. 
coupe, koopa'. 
coupon, koo'pon; (Fr.), koo- 

pon'. 

cour (Scot.), koor. 

Courbet, koorbe'. 

courier, koo'rier, koo'rier. 

Courland, koor'Iand. 
Also spelled Kurland, 

Courtenay, kert'ni. 

courteous, kiir'tSus, kort'- 

yus. 
courtesan, kort'Ssan, klir'- 

tSsan. 
courtesy (a salutation), 

ktirt'si; (civility), 

kurt'Ssi, kort'Ssi. 
courtier, kort'y^r. 
Courtrai, koortre'. 
cousin, kuz'^n. 
Cousin (Fr.), koozan'. 
coute que coute, koot kS 

koot. 
couthie (Scot.), kooth'i. 
Coutts, koots. 
Covent Garden, kiiv'ent 

gard'^n. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, conwect, lemon, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



75 



Coventry, kuv'entri. 
coverlet, kuv'erlet. 
Coverley, kuv'erli. 
covert, kiiv'ert. 
covetous, kuv'etus. 
covey, kuv'i. 
cow (Scot., clip, cut short), 

kou. 
cowardice, kou'erdis. 
cowl, koul. 
Cowley, kou'li. 
cowp (Scot.), koup. 
Cowper (William), koop'er. 

•'To demonstrrrte quickly and easily 
how per- 
versely absurd 'tis to sound this name 

Cowper, 
As people in general call him named 

super, 
I remark that he rhymes it himself 
with horse-trooper." 

Lowell (fable for Critics). 

cow'rin (Scot.), koor'in. 
cowt (Scot.), kout. 
coyote, kio'tS, ki'ot; (Sp.), 

koyo'ta. 
cozen, kiiz^n. 
Cracow, kra'ko. 

The Polish form of the name, 
Krakow J is said to be pronounced 
krd'koof; the German form, Kra- 
kaUy is pronounced krd'kou, 

craem (Scot.), kram. 
crag (Scot.), krag. 
Craigenputtock, kragen- 
ptit'ok. 

bhr, iu=u in use, Am, up, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mem. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



cran (Scot.), kran. 
crankous (Scot.), krank'us. 
cranreuch (Scot.), kran'- 

rfiCH. 
cravenette, krav'net'. 
craw, kro. 

creagh (Scot.), kreCH. ' 
Creakle, kre'kl. * 

creature, kre'tiur, kre'cher. 
The first is preferred by the 
dictionaries; the second is that 
most commonly heard on the 
lips of careful speakers. 

Crecy, krase'. 
credence, kre'dens. 
credulous, kred'iultis. 
creek, krek. 
creesh (Scot.), kresh. 
Creighton, kri't^n, kra'tun. 
cremate, kremat'. 

The word seems to have come 
into use in its modern sense 
about 1875 or earlier, when it 
was pronounced kre'maty which 
is stiU allowed but not preferred. 

crematory, kre'matSri, kre'- 

matori. 
creme, kram. 
creme de menthe, krdm dS 

mant'. 
crescendo, kreshen'do, kr6- 

sen'do. 
crescive, kres'iv. 



76 



EVERT-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Cressida, kresidS. 
cretonne, kr5t5n', kre'ton. 
Creusa, kreiu'sa. 
crevasse, krevas'. 
Crevecoeur, krevkor. 
crew, kroo. 
Crfrichton, kri't'n. 
Crimea, krlme'& ; (Brit.) , 

kri'mSa. 
Crimean, krime'an, krime'- 

crinoline, krm'81!n. 

British usage prefers hrin'dUn; 
American dictionaries allow krin'- 
dim, 

Critias, krishlas. 
Crito, kri'to. 
Croat, kro'at. 
Croatian, kr8a'shan, 
crochet, krSsha'; (Brit.), 

kro'shj. 
Croesus, kre'sus. 
crombie (Scot.), krtlm'i. 
Cronje, kr6n'yg. 
Cronus, kron'iis. 
crosier, kro'z^r. 
Crothers, kriitfe'^rz. 
croupier, kroop'ier, kroop- 

er'; (Fr.), kroopya'. 
crouton, krootoA'. 
crowdy (Scot.), kroud'L 

ale, senite, c&re, Ht, accord, Srm, ask, 
thSre, ovftr, Eden, ice, Kll, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



crude, krood. 
cruel, kroo'Sl. 
cruise, krooz. 
crustacean, kriista'shian. 
crux, krtiks. 
cuckoo, kook'oo. 
cucumber, kiu'kumb^r. 
cui bono, ki bo'no. 
cuif (Scot.), kM, koof. 
cuirass, kweras'. 
cuirassier, kweraser'. 
cuisine, kwezen'. 
cuisser (Scot.), kti'ser. 
cuitikin (Scot.), kti'tildn. 
cuittle (Scot.), kuf'l. 
cul de sac, kii d^sSk', ktil 

d^ sSk'. 
Culebra, kiula'bra; (Sp.), 

koola'bra. 
culinary, kiu'IinSrSf. 
Cumean, kiume'an. 
cumulative, kiu'miulativ. 
Cunctator, kiink'tater. 
cimeiform, kiune'if6rm, 

kiun'eiform. 
cunyie (Scot.), kiin'yS. 
cupola, kiu'p61S,. 
curagao, kiur^so'. 

From the proper name, Cvr 
racao (kiurdsd'o). The common 
nomi has so widely been mis- 
spelled curacoa that the pro- 
sofa, lovable, eve, llvent, ^nd, rec?nt, 
cSffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



77 



nunciation may fairly be said to 
be in good use. Kooraso' is also 
allowable. 

curate, kiu'rS,t. 

curator, kiura'tor. 

curcuddoch (Scot.), Mr- 

kud'uCH. 
cure, kiur. 
cure, kiura'. 

curmudgeon, ktirmtidz'un. 
currach (Scot.), kiir'a, 

koor'aCH. 
curracks (Scot.), kur'tiks. 
curriculum, kfirik'iultim. 
curtail, k^rtal'. 

The word was originally 
stressed on the first syllable, 
and the noun, an architectural 
term, is regularly so stressed 

curtain, ktirt'n. 

curule, kiu'rool. 

cusser (Scot.), koos'^r. 

cute (Scot.), koot, ktlt. 

cutikin (Scot.), kiitikin. 

cuvier, ktivya'. 



Cuxhaven, kooks'hMen. 
Cuyp, koip. 
Cybele, sib'^le. 
Cyclades, sik'ladez. 
Cyclopean, sikl&pe'an. 
Cymbeline, sim'bSlin, sim'- 

belin. 
Cymric, kJm'rik. 
C5anry, kim'ri, sim'ri. 
Cynewulf, kin'ewoolf. 
cynosure, sin'Sshdor, sin'- 

6shoor. 
Cyprian, sip'rian. 
Cyrene, si're'ne. 
Cyril, si'ril. 
Cytherea, sJth^re'S. 
Czajkowski, chikdf'skS. 
czar, zap, tsar. 

So also czar'eviichy czar'evnaf 
czarina {zdfe'na, isaxe'ria), and 
the like. 

Czech, chek. 
Czernowitz, cher'n8vlts. 
Czerny, chSr'nS. 



ohr, iu=u in use, dm, up, circus, menii, food, f66t, out, oil, ai^gle, part, thin, 
that, a:fure, CH=Germ. »cA, ft (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15*20. 



D 



da capo, d& k3,'po. 

dachshund, daCHs'hoont. 

dacker (Scot.), dak'er. 

dactyl, dak'til. 

dad (Scot., to thresh). 

da'do. 

dsedalian, dSdal'yan. 

Daedalus, ded'alus. 

dsemon, de'mon. 

Daghestan, da'gestan'. 

Dagnan Bouveret, danyan' 

boovre'. 
Dagobert, dag'Sbert, dag6'- 

Dagon, da'g5n. 
Daguerre, dager'. 
daguerreotype, dager '6tip. 
dahabeah, dahabe'i. 
Dahlgren, dal'gren. 
dahlia, dal'ya. 
Dahomey, daho'ma. 
daigh (Scot.), daCH. 
da'is. 

Originally monosyllabic, and 
still allowably pronounced das. 

D'Albert, dalbdr'. 

file, senate, c&re, at, accord, Srm, ask, 
thgre, ov^r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb 



Dalhousie, dSlhoo'zi, dS-l- 

hou'zi. 
dal segno, dal sa'nyo. 
Damascene, dam'&sen. 
Damien de Veuster, dam- 

yan de vtistar'. 
Anglicized as (Father) Ddm^- 

damme, dam's, 
damnable, dam'nab'l. 
damned, damd, dam'ned. 
Cf. blessed. 

Damoclean, damOkle'an. 
Damocles, dam'&klez. 
damoizelle, dam'izel. . 

This form, together with dam- 
oselj damozel {ddm'ozU), and 
others, are archaic variants of 
damsel, 

Damon, da'mSn. 

damosel. 

See damoizelle. 
damozel. 

See damoizelle. 
Damrosch, dam'rSsh. 
damson, dam'z'n. 
Danae, dan'ae. 
Danaides, dana'idez. 
dance, dans. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



79 



dandilly (Scot.), dan'dili. 
Dandin, dandan'. 
Dan'ddlo. 
danseuse, dansoz'. 
Dan'te. 
See also Alighieri. 

Dan't^an. 

Dantesque, dantesk'. 

Danton'. 

danton (Scot.), don'ton. 

Danubian, daniu'bian. 

d'Arblay. 
See Arblay. 

Dardanelles, dardSnelz'. 

Dardanius. 

Darda'nus. 

Commoner form of the above 
name. 

darg (Scot.). 

Da'rien'. 

Dictionaries give the primary 
stress on the last syllable; but 
in practice the first and third 
receive about equal stress, as m 
Keats' 
"Silent upon a peak in Darien." 

Dari'iis. 

D'Artagnan, dartanyan'. 

Dartmouth, dart'muth. 

Darwin'ian. 

da'ta. 

da'tum. 



daub, dob. 
Daubigny, doben'ye. 
daud (Scot.), d6d. 
Daudet, dode'. 
daunt, dant, dont. 

American dictionaries prefer 
the first, British dictionaries 
prefer the second. 

daunton (Scot.), d6n'tiin. 
D'Avenant, dav'enant. 
Davoc (Scot.), da'vtik. 
deaf, def. 

deas (Scot.), des, das. 
deasil (Scot.), da'zil. 
debacle, dSba'k'I. 

The French form, dShdcle, is 
pronounced ddbdk'^L 

debauch, dsboch'. 
debauchee, debSshe'. 
debenture, dSben'tiur. 
debonair, debOn^r'. 
de bonne grace, de bSn gr&s. 
Deborah, deb'ora. 
debouch, dSboosh'. 
debris, dabre'. 
De Burgh, de bllrg. 
Debussy, debuse'. 
debut, dabii', dsbiu'. 

debutante, dabiitant'. 

The masculine form, debu- 
tant ^ is pronounced dabutdn'. 

decade, dek'ad. 



6hr, iu = u in use, <irn, iip, circus, menu, food, foot, out, oil, ai?gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



decadence, dfeka'dens, 
dek'&dens. 
British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. So also decadency and 
decadant. 

decalogue, dek'al6g. 
Decameron, d§kam'6ron. 
decameter, dek'ametSr. 
decemvir, desem'ver. 
decemvirate, desem'virat. 
deciduous, desid'iutis. 
decisive, dSsl'siv. 
Decius, desh'ius. 
declarative, d^klar'ativ. 
declination, dgklJna'shun. 
declivous, dSkllv'us. 
decolletage, dakSFtS,?'. 
decollete, dakSFta'. 
decorative, dek'6rat!v. 
decorous, dekor'us, dSk'- 

6rus. 
decrepit, dekrgp'it. 
decretal, dekre'tal. 
decretory, dek'retdri. 
deduce, dsdius'. 
defalcate, defSl'kat. 
defalcation, def^lka'shiin. 
defalcator, def ^Ikat^r. 

The Oxford Dictionary indi- 
cates dtf- as the sound of the 
iBrst syllable of these two words. 
American usage, however, prefers 
the "short" e sound. 

ale, senate, oUre, at, accord, Srm, ask, 
th€re, ovSr, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb 



defamatory, d5f5,m'at6ri. 

defeasance, dSfe'zans. 

deficit, def'isit. 

defilade, defilad'. 

defile, dsfll'. 

definitive, d^fin'itiv. 

defloration, defl6ra'shtin. 

degag6, dagaza'. 

deglutition, dSglootish'un, 

deglootish'un. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

degout, dagoo'. 

DeGroot, degrot'. 

de gustibus non est dis- 
putandum, de gftst'- 
ibus n6n 6st dispiu- 
t3,n'dum. 

Deianira, deyani'ra. 

deign, dan. 

Dei gratia, de'i gra'sUa. 

deiphobus, deif 6bus. 

dejeuner, dazona'. 

de jure, de dzoo're. 

Delacroix, de la krwi'. 

D^and'. 

Delaroche, d^l5,rosh. 

De La Warr, del'awar. 
Jones gives the ''Public School 

Pronunciation" of this as d^V- 

dwd. 

de'le. 

sofa, lovable, eve, Svent, «5nd, recSnt* 
cSffee, odd, connect, lem6n, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



81 



delectation, d5lekta'shiin. 
delenda est Carthago, d§- 

lenda Sst kartha'go. 
deleterious, delSte'ritis. 
Delhi (India), del'e; (U. 

S.), dsrhi. 
delicacy, derikasi. 
delinquent, dslin'kw^nt. 
delirious, delir'ftis. 
d^lir'iiim. 
De'lms. 
Delia Cruscan,del'a kroos'- 

k4n, del'S. krtis'kan. 
American dictionaries vote for 
the first, but the Oxford gives 
only the second. 

De'los. 

Delphi, del'fi. 
Delphine, derfin. 
Delphinus, delfln'iis. 
Delsarte, d§ls&ft'. 
delude, dSlood'. 
delusion, dSloo'zun. 
de luxe, de looks', 
demagogic, dSmagSdz'ik. 
demagogue, dem'agog. 
Demas, de'mas. 
demesne, dsman', dSmen'. 
Dictionaries prefer the first, 
but Keats preferred the second: 

"Oft of one wide expanse had I been 
told 
That deep-browed Homer rules as his 
demesne; 

ohr, iu=u in use, Arn, up, circus, menii, food, f56t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
feat, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, A (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20 



Yet never did I breathe ita pure 

serene 
Till I heard Chapman speak out loud 
and bold;" 
{On First J^ookino into Chapman' 8 Homtr,) 

Demeter, dSme't^r. 
Demetrius, dSmSt'riiis. 
Demidov, dy§me'd6f. 
demi-monde, dem'imond, 

dtoemdAd'. 
Democritus, dSmSk'ritiis, 
demoiselle, dem'wazel'. 
demoniacal, demSni'akal. 
demonstrable, dSm5n'stra- 

Wl 
demonstrate, dem'onstrat. 
demonstrative, d S m 5 n ' - 

etfStiv. 
demonstrator, d S m ' o n - 

strat^r. 
de mortui3 nil nisi bonum, 

de mort'iuis nil nisi 

bon'um. 
Demosthenic, demSsthen'- 

ik. 
Denham, den'am. 
denier (a coin), dSne?'; 

(one who denies), 

deni'er. 
denouement, danoo'm&n. 
de no'vo. 
Dent du Midi, dan dii 

mede'. 



82 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



denunciate, dSnun'shiat. 
Denys, dene'. 
Deo gratias, de'8 gra'shias. 
De'6 v61en'tg. 
depilate, dep'ilat. 
depilatory, depil'at6ri. 
depot, de'po. 

Almost any conceivable pro- 
nunciation of this word may be 
justified on the ground of more 
or less general usage, but this 
is now the prevalent one for 
those who use the word at all 
in English — it is misused as ap- 
phed to a railroad station, and 
superfluous as meaning store" 
house. 

deprecative, dep'rSkativ. 
deprecatory, dep'rSkatOri. 
depredatory, dep'rgdat8ri. 
So given in American dic- 
tionaries; the Oxford, however, 
gives depred'dtort first. 

deprivation, depriva'shun. 
De Profundis, de prSfiin'- 
dis. 

Deptford, det'ferd. 

Jones gives doffed, 
Derby, der'bi. 

Jones gives ddh% daVtsJild 
{Derbyshire) y with the comment: 
''The form de'hi also exists, but 
is rare among educated speak- 
ers." As an American name, 
however, it has only the sound 
indicated above. 

Derelict, der'glikt. 

ale, senate, c&re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ovSr, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



dereliction, derglik'shun. 
De Reszke, de res'ki. 
de rigueur, de re'gtir'. 
derisive, dSri'siv. 
dernier, der'nier. 

The word was Anglicized with 
this sound in the seventeenth 
and eighteenth centuries, but 
now when used at all is French, 
as in dernier ressort, demya risdr'. 

derogate, der'ogat. 
derogative, der5g'ativ. 
dervis. 
See dervish. 

Desbrosses (Street in N. 
Y. C), desbr5s'gs; 
(Jean Alfred), dabros'. 
descant (verb), des'kant'. 

The substantive, a more or 
less technical term in music, is 
pronounced des'kant, 

Descartes, da'kart'. 

Deschamps, da'shan'. 

descrive (Scot.), deskrev'. 

descry, d^skri'. 

Desdemona, dezdgmo'na. 

desert (wilderness), dez'- 
^rt; (in other mean- 
ings — subst., adj., 
verb), dezert'. 
See also dessert. 

deshabille, dezabel'. 
See also dishabille. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



83 



desiccate, des'ikat. 
desideratum, desidera'tum. 
designatory, des'ignatori. 
desipere in loco, d§sip'ere 

in lo'ko. 
Des Lys, Gaby, ga'be 

dales'. 
Des Moines, dS moin'. 
desolate, des'Slat. 
desperado, desp^ra'do. 
despicable, des'pikab'l. 
despite, dSspit'. 
despumate, dSspiu'mat. 
dessert, dSzilrt'. 
See also desert. 

destine, des'tin. 
Destinn (Emily), des'tin. 
desuetude, des'wStiud. 
desultory, des'ultSri. 
detail, detal'. 

This is the only permissible 
sound for the verb, and is prefer- 
able for the substantive also. 

Detaille, deta'y'. 
deteriorative, dSte'ri6rativ. 
detestation, detesta'shun. 
detonate, det'Snat, det'- 
6nat. 

The second is the choice of the 
dictionaries; the first represents 
actual practice. 



detonator, det'6na'ter. 

Here also the dictionaries call 
for the e sound in the first syl- 
lable, but it is never heard in 
speech. 

detour, dStoor'. 

detritus, dStri'tus. 

de trop, de tr8'. 

Dettingen, det'inen. 

Deucalion, diuka'lion. 

deuk (Scot.), dtik, dyook. 

deus ex machina, de'us eks 

mak'ina. 

Deutsch, doich. 

Deutschland, doich'lSnt. 

devastate, dev'astat. 

devastation, devasta'shun. 

De Vinne, ds vin'S. 

devise, dfevlz'. 

Not to be confused in sound 
with device {devils'), 

devisee, dev'ize, d§v'ize. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

devoir, devw&r'. 

This word was once Angli- 
cized (and variously pronounced) 
but is now felt as French, and so 
sounded. 

dew, diu. 

dexterous, dgks'tertis, 
deks'triis. 
Often spelled dextrous and 
pronounced with two syllables. 



bhr, iu=u in use, dm, up, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, aijigle, pajt, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CIi5=Germ. ich^ n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20, 



S4 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Dhu, doo. 

So the "glossaries" tell us. 
Scott, to be sure, rhymes it with 
anew (dniu'), but it is a rare 
poet who does not consider oo, iu 
a valid rhyme. 

diable, dia'b'l. 
diablerie, di&'blM. 
diaeresis, diSr'Ssis. 
diagnosis, diagno'sis. 
diagnostician, dlagn5stish'- 

an. 
dialogist, diSl'Sdzfet. 
dialogize, dial'6dziz. 
Dian, di'an. 
Diana, dian'a. 
diapason, di'apa'zon. 
diaphanous, diaf'anus. 
diaphragm, di'afram. 
diaphragmatic, diafrfigm- 

at'ik. 
diastole, diSs'tSlS. 
diathesis, di^th'gsfe. 
diatom, di'at5m. 
diatribe, di'atrib. 
Diaz, de'as. 

The Spanish pronunciation 
would be de'dthy but the Mexi- 
cans pronounce it as indicated 
above. 

dictator, dikta'ter. 
Diderot, ded'r5'. 
Di'do. 

ale, eenllte, cftre, lit, llooord, firm, Ssk, 
there, over, Edio, Soe, IU, old. 6bey. Orb. 



Dieppe, dSSp'. 

Dies Irae, di'ez i're. 

dietary, di'^tM. 

Dieu et mon droit, dyA a 

m6n drwS,'. 
diffuse (verb) , dif iuz' ; 

(adj.), dffius'. 
diffusive, difiu'siv. 
digestion, didzes'chtln. 
dight (Scot.), dgCHt. 
digitalis, dMzita'lfe. 
digitiform, didz'!tif6rm. 
digitigrade, dWz'itigrad. 
digress, digrgs'. 
digression, digrgsh'Qn. 
Dijon, dez6n'. 
dilate, dilat', dilat'. 

Dictionaries prefer the first, 
but is it ever heard in speech? 

dilemma, dflSm'S, dilSm'S,. 
dilettante, dil'Stto'tS. 
dilution, diliu'shun, diliu'- 

shun. 
diluvial, diliu'vlSL 
diluvian, diliu'viSn. 
diluvium, diliu'vittm. 
dlm'tttv. 

diminuendo, diminiuSn'do. 
diminution, dimmiu'shun. 
din (Scot.), den. 
dindle (Scot.), dgn'dU. 

8of&, lov&ble, eve, invent, Snd, recent, 
c5ffee, odd, connect, lemdn, o (Qerm.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



85 



ding (Scot.), d^n. 
dink (Scot.), dgnk. 
dinna (Scot.), din'^. 
dinnle (Scot.), dgn'l. 
dinosaur, di'n6s6r. 
diocesan, diSs'esan. 
diocese, di'6ses. 
Diodonis Siculus, diddo'- 

riis sik'iultis. 
Diogenes, di5'dz5nez. 
Diomed, di'8mSd. 
Diomede, di6me'de. 
Diomedes, di6me'dez. 
Dione, dio'ne. 
Dionysia, diftnJsh'ia. 
Dionysiac, di&nis'iak. 
Dionysian, diSnish'&n. 
Dionysus, diOni'sus. 
diorama, di6ra'ma. 
diphtheria, difthe'riS,. 
diphtheritic, difthgrftlk. 
diphthong, dif th5n. 
diploma, diplo'ma. 
diplomatist, diplo'mitist. 
diptych, dip'tik. 
Dircsean, dtifse'Sn. 
Dirce, dtir'se. 
direct, dirSkt, direkt'. 
directly, direkt'K. 
Directoire, de'rgk'twar'. 
dirigible, dir'Mziba. 



dis (Scot.), diz. 

dis aliter visum, dis Sl'iter 

vis'um. 
disapprobatory, disSp'rS- 

bat6rf. 
disaster, dizas'tSr. 
discard, disk^rd'. 

This is the approved pro- 
nunciation for both substantive 
and verb. Dis'kard as the noun 
is recognized by the new Web- 
ster, but it would seem that 
neither the sound nor sense of 
the word as meaning scraps 
heap has yet swum into the 
ken of the lexicographer. 

discern, dizArn'. 
discernible, diziir'nib'l. 
discernment, diztirn'ment. 
discipline, dis'iplm. 
discobolus, disk5b'81iis. 
discomfit, diskiim'fit. 
discomfiture, diskum'fitiur. 
discourse, diskors'. 

This is the only approved 
pronunciation for the word, 
either as substantive or verb. 

discrepancy, diskrep'ansi. 

DXs'Mpdn'si is allowed also 
by the Oxford Dictionary. 

disease, dizez'. 

dishabille, disdbel'. 
See also deshabille. 

dishevel, dishev'el. 

'6hr, iu=u in use, (irn, up, circus, menii, food, fd6t, out, oil, a^gle, part, thin; 
feat, a? ure, CH = Germ, ich, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20, 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



disinclination, disinklina'- 

shun. 
disintegration, disintSgra'- 

shun. 
disjune (Scot.), dsjoon'. 
dislocate, dis'lokat. 
disna (Scot.), diz'na. 
disparate, dis'parSt. 
disputable, dis'piutab'l, 

dispiut'ab'l. 
disputant, dis'piutant. 
disputative, dispiut'ativ. 
Disraeli, dizra'li. 
disreputable, disrep'iutab^I. 
disseminative, (Msem'ina- 

tiv. 
dissimilitude, disimil'itiud. 
dissimulative, disim'iula- 

tiv. 
dissociate, diso'shiat. 
dissolute, dis'61iut. 
dissolve, dizSlv'. 
dissyllabic, disilab'ik. 
distich, dis'tik. 
distingue, distan'ga. 
distrait, dSstra'. 
distributive, distrib'iutiv. 
district, dis'trikt. 
dithyramb, dith'iramb. 
dittay (Scot.), dit'^L. 
diurnal, diur'nal. 

ale, senate, c4re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill^ 5ld, obey, 6rb, 



diva, de'va. 

divagation, divaga'shun. 
divan, divan', 
diverge, diverdz, diverdz. 
divers, di'verz. 
diverse, divtirs'. 
diversely, divlirs'li. 
divert, divurt'. 
divertissement, de'vertes'- 

man'. 
Dives, di'vez. 
divest, divest'. 
Divina Commedia, deve'- 

na k6mma'dya. 

divinatory, divin'atOri. 

divisible, diviz'ib'I. 

divulgate, divul'gat. 

Dixmude, dsks'miid. 

dizen, diz"n, dlz"n. 

The Oxford Dictionary prefers 
the second. 

Dmitriev, dme'treyef. 

Dneiper, ne'per. 

Dneister, nes'ter. 

dobby (Scot.), dob'i. 

Dobrudja, dobroo'dza. 

doch - an - dorrach (Scot.)^ 

d6CH'-an-d6r'aCH. 

dochter (Scot.), dS'CHt^r. 

docile, dos'il. 

Dodonsean, do'done'an. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.^ 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



87 



dog, dog. 

doge, dodz. 

dolce, dorcha. 

dolce far niente, dSl'cha 

far nyen'ta. 
doldrums, dol'drumz. 
dolmen, dol'men. 
Dolomites, dol'Omits. 
Dolores, dolo'res. 
doloroso, dolSro'so. 
dolorous, doreriis. 
Dom (Portuguese title), 

dom; (a cathedral 

church), dom. 
domain, dOman'. 
domicile, dom'isil. 
domine, dom'inS. 
Dominican, dOmin'ikan. 
Dominique, dominek'. 
Domremy-Ia-Pucelle, don- 

reme'-la-ptiser. 
Don, don. 

So Anglicized, either as the 
Russian river or the Spanish 
title: the Spanish sound is don. 

Dona, do'ny^,. 
Donajec. 

See Dunajec. 
Donalbain, don'alban. 
Donatello, donatel'lo. 
Donati, dOna'te. 
donative, don'ativ. 



Doncaster, dSn'kaster. 
Donegal, don'Sgol'. 
Don Giovanni, don dzo- 
van'ne. 
Try to pronounce both n's. 

Donizetti, do'ne-dzet'te. 
Try to pronounce both t^s, 

Don Jose, don hoza'. 

Anglicized as ddn d^o'zd. 
Don Juan, don dzti'an. 

As the name of the hero cele- 
brated by Byron this is univer- 
sally AngUcized as here indi- 
cated. In Spanish it would be 
don hwdn'. 

donkey, don'ki. 

The original pronunciation, 
rhyming with monkeyy is still 
preferred by some. 

donnered (Scot.), dSn'ert. 
Don Pasquale, don pask- 

w^a'la. 
Don * Quixote, d6n kwik'- 
s6t. 
Universally so Anghcized; the 
Spanish sound would be don 
kehot'd, 

donsie (Scot.), dSn'zL 

D'ooge, doge. 

Doone, doon. 

doppel ganger, dSp'el 

gen'^r. 
Dorcas, d6r'kS;S. 
Dore, dora'. 



ohr, iu=*=u pn use, Am, up, circus, menii, food, f66t, out, oil, a^gle, part, thin, 
that, azure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 

7 



88 



eve:5y-day pronunciation 



Dorian, do'rian. 

Doric, dor'ik. 

doriach (Scot.), d6r'laCH. 

Dorothea, d6r6the'a. 

D'Orsay, Quai, ka dSr'se'. 

Dortmund, dort'moont. 

dos-a-dos, do'z&do'. 

dost, dust. 

Dostoyevski, d6s't5yef'sk§. 

dot (dowry), dot. 

Sometimes Anglicized as d6t. 
Note that in the French sound 
of the word the t is not silent 
as one would expect. 

Dotaea, dote'a. 

dotage, dot'adz. 

dotal, dotale (Fr.), dot^l'. 

dotard, do'tard. 

dotation, dota'shiin. 

Dotavia, dotaVii. 

Dotcziwicz, dot'chMch. 

dote, dot. 

dote, dotee (Fr.), dota'. 

Dotenwald, dot'envalt. 

doth, duth. 

Dotheboys' (Hall), doo'- 

the boiz. 
dottle (Scot.), dSt'tl. 
Douai, Douay, dooa'. 
double entendre, doo'br 

an'tan'dr'. 

ale, senllte, cdre, at, accord, arm, Ssk, 
thSre, ov€r, Eden, ice, ill, old, dbey, 6rb, 



double entente, doo'bF 

an'tan't. 
douce (Scot.), doos. 
douceur, doo'sor. 
douche, doosh. 
dought (Scot.), d&CHt. 
doughty, dou'ti. 
douk (Scot.), dook. 
Douma, doo'ma. 
doun (Scot.), doon. 
dour (Scot.), door, 
douriach (Scot.), door'- 

mCH. 
douse (Scot.), doos. 
dow (Scot.), dou. 
dowager, dou'Sdzer. 
dowcote (Scot.), doo'kSt. 
dowed (Scot.), doud. 
dowf (Scot.), douf. 
dowie (Scot.), dou'i. 
Dowie, douTf. 
downa (Scot.), dou'nS. 
downby (Scot.), ddon'W. 
doyen, dwayan'. 
dozen (Scot., tostun) , doz^n. 
Drachenfels, dra'CHenfels. 
drachm, dram, 
drachma, drak'mlL. 
Draco, dra'ko. 
Draconian, drSko'nian. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



89 



draconic, drS,k5ii'ik. 

The word would begin with a 
capital as derived from the prop- 
er name Draco; as derived from 
dragon it would not. 

draft. 

dragee, draza'. 

draigle (Scot.), dra'g'l. 

drama, dra'ma. 

dramatis personae, dram'- 

atis perso'ne. 

dramaturgy, dram'atArdzi. 

drant (Scot.). 

draught, draft. 

Drawcansir, dr6kan's6r. 

drawer, dro'er. 

There is in practice a distinc- 
tion in pronunciation between 
the word which means one who 
draws (**the drawer of water ")» 
and that which names the shding 
receptacle in a piece of furniture, 
the latter being more nearly 
monosyllabic drdW. See Oxford 
Dictionary. 

dreamed, dremd. 

It is the other form, dreamt^ 
that is pronounced dr<imU 

dreamt. 

See dreamed, 
drear, drer. 
Dreibund, dri'boont. 
dreigh (Scot.), dreCH. 
Dresden, drSz'dSn; (Ger.) 
dras'dSn. 



Dreyfus, dra'fiis'. 
drochlin (Scot.), dr&CH'- 

Un. 
Drogheda, dr6'CHSd&. 
droghling (Scot.), dr6CH'- 

lin. 
droich (Scot.), droCH, 

droiCH. 
droichy (Scot.), droCH'i, 

droiCH'L 
dromedary, drfim'SdS,ri' 

dr5m'edari. 
dronach (Scot.), dro'naCH. 
droschke, dr5sh'ki. 
dross, dr5s. 
drought, drout. 
droughty, drout'i. 
drouk (Scot.), drook. 
droukit (Scot.), drook'it. 
drouth (Scot.), drooth. 
drouth, drouth, 
drow (Scot.), drou. 
drucken (Scot.), drook'en. 
Druid, droo'id. 
drumly (Scot.), drum'll. 
Druses, drooz'ez. 
Dryburgh, dri'buro, dri'- 

bro. 
dual, diu'3,1. 
Du Barry, du ba're'. 
dubiety, diubi'StL 



ohr, iu=u in use, <irn, iSp, circus, menii, food, f66t, out, oil, apgle, paft, thin, 
tfeat, a?ure, QB. = Germ, ich, 6 (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20, 



90 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



dubious, diu'biiis. 
Dubois, diibwa'. 

This indicates the French 
sound. As an American name 
it is conmionly pronounced 
divbois\ 

Dubno, dSob'no. 
ducat, duk'at. 
Duchesne, dii'shen'. 
ductile, duk'til. 
due, diu. 
duel, diu'el. 
duet, diuet'. 
Duguesclin, diigaklan'. 
duke, diuk. 
Dulcinea, dulsin'fea. 
dule (Scot.), diil. 
Dulwich, dtiridz, diirich. 
duly, diu'li. 
Dumas, dii'ma'. 
Du Maurier, dii mo'rya'. 
Dumfries, dum'fres. 

Diinaburg, dti'iiaboorCH. 

Same as Dvinsk. 
Dunajec, doona'yets. 
Duncan, dunkan. 
dune (Scot., dnu), doon, 

diin. 
dungaree, diin'gare. 
duniwassal (Scot.), doon'- 

iwQs'al. 



Dunois, dii'nwa'. 
duodenum, duOde'niim. 
duomo, dwo'mo. 
Dupont, diupont'. 
Dupre, dxi'pra'. 
Dupuy, dti'pwe'. 
Duquesne, dii'kan'. 
Durazzo, ddorat'so. 
Diirer, Albrecht, albreCHt 

diirer. 
Durham, dur'am. 
Duse, doo'za. 
Diisseldorf, diis'gldorf. 
duty, diu'ti. 
duumvir, diuum'vSr. 
Duval, diuvaF. 
Duyckinck, di'Idnk. 
Dvinsk, dvSnsk. 
Dvorak, dvor'zak. 
Dwina, dwe'na. 
dynamite, di'namit. 

Uin'amlt is also allowed, but it 
is seldom heard. 

dynamo, di'namo. 
dynasty, dl'nasti. 
dysentery, dis'entM. 
dyspepsia, dispep'sha, dis- 
pep'sia. 
Dictionaries prefer the second, 
but the first is the almost uni- 
versal sound of the word. 






ale, senSte, cSre, at, accord, arm, ask, sofa, lov&ble, eve, ^vent, end, recent, 
tb^re, Qv6r, Kden, ice, jlj, old, obey, 6rb, cof §ej odd, connect, lepioii, o (Germ.) 



E 



Eames (Emma), amz. 
ear, e(e)r. 

American dictionaries give er, 
but this hardly represents the 
best American usage. Many, 
and perhaps most, of our best 
speakers sound it as did Keats 
in his attempt 

**to~mingle music fit for the soft ear 
Of goddess Cytherea." 

easel, e'zel. 

eastward, est'werd. 

eath (Scot.), efe, eth. 

eau, o. 

eau de Cologne, 5 de kSlon'; 

(Fr.), o de kolon'y'. 
eau de vie, o d6 ve'. 
Eaux, Les, lazo'. 
Eaux Vives, o vev. 
Ebal, e'bal. 
Ebers, Georg, gaorCH' a'- 

bers. 
Ebionite, e'beOnit. 
Eblis, eb'lis. 
Eboracum, ebSra'kum. 
Ebro, e'bro; (Span.), a'bro. 
ebullience, eburyens. 
ebullition, ebulish'un. 
eburin, eb'iurin. 

ohr, iu=u in use, dm, up, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, aijgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



ecarte, a'kar'ta'. 
Ecbatana, ekbat'ana. 
ecce homo, ek'sS ho'mo. 
ecce signum, ek'sS sig'num. 
Ecclefechan, ek'lfeCH'an. 
echelon, esh'elon; (Fr.), 

eshelon'. 
echinoderm, Ski'ii6dtirm, 

ek'in&durm. 
Eckmiihl, ek'miil. 
eclair, a'klar'. 
eclaircissement, akldrses'- 

man. 
eclat, a'kla'. 
eclogue, ek'16g. 
Ecole des Beaux Arts, 

a'kor da bo'zar'. 
Ecole Polytechnique, a'kol' 

pSleteknek'. 
economic, ekSnom'ik. 
economical, ekondm'ikal. 
economics, ekSnom'iks. 
ecru, a'kroo, gk'roo; (Fr.), 

akrii'. 
Ecuador, ekVador'; (Sp.), 

akwathor'. 
ecumenical, gkiumen'ikal. 



92 



every-day pronunciation 



eczema, gk'zgma. 
eczematous, ekzem'atus. 
Edam, e'dam. 
Eden, e'den. 
Edinburgh, ed"nbur6, 6d'- 

inburo. 
edition de luxe, a'de'syon' 

d^ liiks'. 
editio princeps, fedish'io 

prin'seps. 
Edomite, e'domit. 
educate, gd'iukat. 
eerie, e'ri. 
effeir (Scot.), 6'fer'. 
efferent, ef erent. 
effete, efet'. 
efficacy, ef'ikS-si. 
effigies, efidz'iez. 

The plural of effigy (with the 
same spelling) is pronounced 

effort, gf'Srt, gf'^rt. 

effusive, efiu'siv. 
Egalite, a'ga'le'ta'. 
Egeria, Sdze'ria. 
Egeus, Sdze'us. 
eglantine, eg'lantin. 
ego, e'go, e'go. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

egregious, ^gre'dziis. 

ale, senate, c&re, at, accord, Srm, Ssk, 
there, ovdr, Eden, ice, ill, 5ld, 6bey, drb, 



egret, e'gret, eg'ret. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

Ehrenbreitstein, arenbrit'- 

shtin. 
Ehrenfels, a'renfels. 
eident (Scot.), i'dent. 
eider, i'der. 
eidolon, ido'Ion. 
Eiffel (Tower), i'fel. 

Phyffe tells us to pronounce it 
^W. One who does so takes the 
risk of being wholly unintelli- 
gible in England and the United 
States. The name of the en- 
gineer is properly so pronounced, 
and the Frencn name of the 
structure, Tour Eiffel, is pro- 
noimced toor ^fW, 

Eikon Basilike, i'kSn basil'- 

ike. 
Eikonoclastes, i'k5n8kl^s'- 

tez. 
eild (Scot.), eld. 
Eildon, el 'don. 
Eileen, i'len, a'len. 
Ein feste Burg is imser 

Gott, In fgs't^ boorCH 

ist don'ser g5t. 
eisteddfod, asteth'vod. 
either, e'ther, ither. 

American usage is strongly for 
the first. The second is said (by 
Murray) to be "somewhat more 
prevalent in educated speech" 
in London. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent* 
coflfee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



03 



Elamite, e'lamit. 
elan, a'lan'. 
eland, e'land. 
elasticity, elSstis'it!. 
Elbe, el'b^. 
Elbruz, felbrooz'. 
Elburz, elboorz'. 
El Caney, el kina'. 
El Dorado, eId6r5,'do. 
Eleanora d'Este, a'Ia6n6'ri 

de'ste. 
Eleatic, Slgat'ik. 
Eleazar, e'lSa'z^r. 
Electra, felek'tri. 
electrolier, glek'trftler'. 
electrolysis, elektrSl'isis. 
eleemosynary, ^ 1 'S m 5 s ' - 

in&ri, eleimSs'inSrf. 
elegiac, ele'dziS,k, elSdzI'Sk. 
elegiacal, gl'Sdzi'akal. 
elephantiasis, erefanti'asis. 
elephantine, el'ef5,n'tin. 
Eleusinia, eliusin'ia. 
Eleusinian, eliusin'ian. 
Eleusis, ^liu'sis. 
elfeve, a'lSv'. 
eleven, Slev'^n. 
Elgin (Brit, and Scot.), 

el'gin; (Am.), Sl'dzm. 
Elgin, Illinois, and Elgin, 
Canada, have the American 
pronunciation. 



Elia, e'lia. 

Elian, e'lian. 

Elias, eli'as. 

ehgible, elldzib'l. 

Elisir d'Amore, L', laleser' 

damo'ra. 
elite, a'let'. 
elixir, elik'ser. 
Elizabethan, Sliz'abe'than, 

elizabeth'an, 
ellipse, clips'. 
EUora, glo'ra. 
elm. 

Elnathan, elna'than. 
eloge, a'16z'. 
Elohim, eio'Mm, el'fihim, 

elo'hem. 
elongate, el5n'gat. 
El Paso, el pa'so; (Span.), 

al p&'so. 
Elsass Lothringen, SFzas 

ISt'ringen. 
Elsinore, el'sinor'. 
Elssler, els'ler. 
elucidate, eliu'sMat. 
elusive, Sliu'siv. 
elusory, ^liu'sori. 
]6lysee, L', laleza'. 
Elysian, Sliz'an, eliz'ian. 
Elysium, gliz'ium. 

eliz'ium. 



ohr, iu = u in use, Am, xip, circus, menu, food, foot, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
|hat, a:fure, CH=Qerm. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



94 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Elzevir, el'zSver. 
embalm, embam'. 
embarras de (des) richess- 

es, an'ba'ra'de (da) 

re'shes'. 
embarrass, Smbar'as. 
embassage, em'basadz. 
emblematist, emblem'&tist. 
emblematize, emblem'atiz. 
embonpoint, an'bon'pwan'. 
emboss, embos'. 
embouchure, anbooshiir'. 
embroider, embroid'er. 
embroidery, embroid'eri. 
embryonal, em'briSnal. 
eme (Scot.), em. 
emendate, e'mendat. 
emeritus, emSr'itus. 
emersion, emiir'shun. 
emeute, a'mot'. 
emigre, a'me'gra'. 
Emil, amel'. 

So also the feminine form, 
Smile. 

Emilia, Smil'ia, amel'ya. 
Eminence Grise, L', la'- 

me'nans' grez'. 
Eminence Rouge, L', la'- 

me'nans' rooz. 
emir, Smer', e'mer. 
Emma, em'S. 

ale, senate, c^re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Emmanuel, emman'iuSl. 
Emmaus, ema'us. 
Emmeline, em'glin. 

So pronounced, also, when 
spelled Emetine, 

emollient, gmol'yent. 
employee, emploie'. 
empressement, an'pres'- 

man. 
empyreal, empir'Sal, em- 

pire'al. 
empyrean, em'pire'an. 
Ems (Ger.), ams. 
emu, e'miu. 
en avant, an' na'van'. 
Enbrugh (Scot.), en'brti. 
en casserole. 
See casserole. 

enceinte, 3.n'sant', ansant'; 

(Fr.), insant. 
Enceladus, enseFadus. 
encephalic, ensSfal'ik. 
encephalon, ensef'al5n. 
enchant, enchant', 
enchiridion, enkirid'iSn, en- 

kirid'i6n. 
Encke, enke. 
encomium, enko'miiim. 
encore, an'kor'. 
endemic, ^ndem'ik. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



en deshabille, an' da'za'- 

be'ya'. 
en dive, en'div, en'div. 
endogamy, endog'ami. 
Endymion, endim'ion. 
en effet, an'na'fe'. 
enervate, en'ervat. 
eneuch (Scot.), SnyooCH', 

gnooCH'. 
en famille, an' fa'me'y'. 
enfant terrible, an'f&n te'- 

re'b'l. 
enfeoff, Snfef . 
enfilade, enfllad'. 
en fin, ah' fan'. 
Engadine, engaden'. 
engine, en'dzXn. 
Engis, anzes'. 
England, in'gland. 
English, in'glish. 
engross, engros'. 
Enid, e'nid. 
en masse, 6n' mas', 
ennui, an'nwe'. 
ennuye, Sn'nwee'ya'. 
Enoch, e'nok. 
enow (Scot.), enoo'. 
enpassant, an'pa'san'. 
en plein jour, en plan zoor'. 
enquiry, enkwir'i. 
en rapport, en ra'pOr'. 

ohr, iu=u in use, <irn, iip, circus, menii, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) nn 



en regie, an re'gF. 
en route, ah' root', 
ensemble, ah'sah'bl'. 
ensilage, en'siladz. 
en suite, ah' swet'. 
entelechy, entel'Ske. 
entente cordiale, fi,h'tS.ht' 

k6r'dyar. 
enteric, enter'ik. 
enteritis, en'teri'tis. 
entourage, ah'too'raz'. 
entozoan, en'tSzo'an. 
entr'acte, ah'trakt'. 
Entragues, Henriette d', 

&hreet' dahtr3>g'. 
entrails, en'tralz. 
entree, ah'tra'. 
entre nous, ah'tr' noo'. 
entrepdt, an'tr'pd'. 
entrepreneur, &n'tr'pre- 

nAr'. 
envelop, envel'5p. 
envelope, en'velop. 

To give one syllable of this 
word a quasi French sound dn'- 
velope seems a work of superero- 
gation, yet the pronunciation has 
had some currency for more than 
a century. The word was thor- 
oughly at home in English for 
a hundred years before that. 

environs, envi'ronz. 
envoi, ah'vwa'. 

food, foot, out, oil, ai?gle, part, thin, 
n. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



96 



ISVEJB-y-PAY PRONUNCIATION 



Eos, e'6s. 

E5'then. 

epact, e'p&kt, 

Epaminon'das. 

Epaphroditus, ^paf'rddl'- 

tus. 
epaulet, ep'olet. 
epergne, fepfirn', a'pern'. 
fipernay, a'perne'. 
ephemera, Sfem'era. 
Ephialtes, efial'tez. 
ephod, ef'6d. 
Ephraim, e'fraim. 
Epictetus, ep'ikte'tus. 
epicurean, Sp'ikiure'an. 
Epicurus, ep'ikiu'rus. 
Epigonus, epig'Snus. 
epilepsy, ep'ilepsi, 
epilogue, ep'il5g. 
Epimetheus, epime'thius. 
Spinal, apenal'. 
Epinay, d*, da'pe'nS'. 
Epirus, epi'rus. 
episcopacy, 5pis'k6plLsi. 
episodic, episSdlk. 
epistle, ^pis'^L 
epitaph, ep'itSf. 
epitasis, Spit'asis. 
epithalamium, ep'ithala'- 

miiim. 
The word also has the form 

ale, senate, cl^re, ^t, accord, arm, ask, 
^JiSre,, ovfir, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



epithaWmion, but the above 
form is the common one since 
the seventeenth century. 

epitome, €pit'6mS. 

epoch, ep'5k, gp'5k. 

epode, Sp'od. 

epos, ep'os. 

equability, gkwabiriti. 

equable, e'kwab'I, ek'wab'l. 

equanimity, ekwanimlti. 

equatorial, ekwato'rial. 

equerry, Sk'weri, Skwer'i. 

equestrienne, ekwes'tri^n'. 

equilibrate, e'kwili'brat. 

equilibrator, e'kwfll'brat^r. 

equilibrist, Skwil'ibrist, 

gkwilib'rfet, ekwilib'- 

rist. 

equinoctial, ekwinSk'shal. 

equinox, e'kwin5ks. 

equipage, ekVipSd?. 

equipoise, e'kwipoiz. 

equivoque, ek'wiv5k. 

era, e'ra. 

Erasmus, Sraz'miis. 

erasure, Sra'zoor. 

The Oxford Dictionary gives 
ira'ziur; Jones gives era'^e, 

Erato, er'ato. 

Eratosthenes, erat6s'thS- 

nez. 

Erebus, er'Sbus. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



97 



Erechtheum, erekthe'um. 

erectile, Srek'til. 

eremite, er'gmit. 

Eric, er'ik. 

Erigena, eri'dzena. 

Erin, e'rin; er'in. 

Erin go bragh, a'rin g6 

braCH'. 
Erinys, Srin'is. 
Eros, e'r5s. 
Eros'tratus. 
err, 6r. 

erudite, er'oodit. 
Erymanthian, e r i m a n ' - 

thian. 

erysipelas, erisip'Slas. 

Erzenim, erzroom' 

Erzingan'. 

Sound the n and the g sepa- 
rately. 

Esaias, Sza'yas. 

escalade, eskalad'. 

escalator, es'kSIater. 

escapade, esklLpad'. 

escheat, eschet'. 

eschew, gschoo'. 

Escorial, esko'rial; (Sp.), 

askoreS,!'. 

Cf. Escurial. 

escritoire, Ss'kritw2.r'. 



Escurial, eskiu'rial; (Sp.), 
askooreS-l'. 

Cf. Escorial. 
Esdraelon, SsdrS-e'ISn. 
esoteric, esOter'ik. 
Esperanto, es'peran'to. 

So the speakers of the lan- 
guage call it. On the vulgar 
tongue it is ^sperdnt'o. 

espionage, 6s'p!Snadz,espi'- 

onadz, es'pionaz. 
Espr6mesnil d', da'pra'- 
ma'nel'. 
So pronounced, also, when writ- 
ten Spremenil, 

esprit, es'pre'. 

esprit de corps, espre' de 

kor'. 
esquire, ^skwir'. 
essayist, es'aist. 
Essene, esen'. 
Estaing, d', dSs'tan'. 
estate, estat'. 
Esther, es'ter. 
Eteocles, 6te'6klez. 
eternize, eter'niz. 
Etesian, ete'zan. 
ethereal, Sthe'rgal. 
Ethiopic, ethiop'ik. 
ethnicism, eth'nisiz'm. 
ethnography, ethn5g'rafl. 
fitienne, a'tyen'. 



bhr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, fcK>d, fo&t, out, oil, ai?gle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



etude, a'tiid^ 
Euboea, iube'a. 
Euergetes (Ptolemy), iuAr'- 

dzStez. 
Euganean, iuga'ngan, iu- 

gane'an. 
Eugen, oi'gan, oigan'. 
Eugene, iudzen', iu'dzen. 
Eugene, ozen'. 
eugenic, iudzen'ik. 
Eulenspiegel, Tyll, til oil'- 

enshpegel. 
Eumenides, iumSn'idez. 
Eunice, iu'nis. 
Eupatrid, iupat'rid. 
Euphemia, iufe'mia. 
euphemism, iu'femism. 
euphonic, iuf5n'ik. 
Euphrosjme, iufrSs'ine. 
Euphues, iu'fiuez. 
euphuistic, iufiuis'tik. 
Euroclydon, iur5k'lid5n. 
European, iurSpe'an. 
Euryale, iuriale. 
Euryanthe, iurgan'thS. 
Eurydice, iurid'ise. 
Eurystheus, iuris'thius. 
Eustachian, iustak'ian. 
Euterpe, iuttir'pS. 
Euxine, iuk'sin. 
evangel, fevan'dzel. 

ale, eenlite, cdre, at, accord, arm, ask, 
thgre, ov6r, Eden, ice, !11, old, obey, 6rb, 



evasive, eva siv. 

Evelina, eveli'na. 

aversion, fever'shun. 

Evesham, ev'sham. 

"Locally e^shdm, e'sdmJ^ — 
Jones. 

evil, e'v'l. 

evocation, evOka'shiin. 

ewest (Scot.), iu'est. 

ewhow (Scot.), a'hwou 

ewig weibliche, a'viCH 

vTb'liCHg. 
exacerbate, egzSs'erbat. 
exact, ^gzakt'. 
exaggerate, egzMz'erat. 
exalt, egzolt'. 
examination, egzSnJna'- 

shun 

examine, egzam'in. 

example, egzam'p'l. 

exasperate, egzas'perat. 

ex cathedra, eks kathe'drlL. 
Sks kdih'Mra is allowable, but 
by no means usual. 

excise, eksiz'. 
exciseman, eksiz'man. 

*' The deil cam fiddlin thro' the town, 

And danced awa' wi' th* Exciseman, 

And ilka wife cries, ' Auld Mahoun, 

I wish you luck o' the prize, man.' " 

— ^BUBNS. 

excitant, eksit'ant. 
excitation, eksita'shun. 
excitative, eksit'ativ. 
excrement, eks'krgment. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
cofifee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



99 



exculpate, ekskiil'pat. 
exegesis, eksSdze'sis. 
exemplar, egzem'plar. 
exempli gratia, eksemp'li 

gra'shia. 
exempt, egzempt'. 
exequatur, eksskwa'tur. 
exequy, eks'fekw!. 
exeunt, ^k's^unt. 
exhaust, ^gzost'. 
exhibit, egzib'it. 
exhilarate, egzil'5,rat. 
exhort, Sgzort', Sgzhort'. 
exigeant, agzezan'. 
exigeante, agzezMt'. 
exigent, ek'sidzent. 
exiguity, ^ksigiu'iti. 
exile, ek'sil. 
exist, egzist'. 
exit, ek'sit. 
ex libris, eks li'bris. 
exogamy, eks5g'ami. 
exonerate, egz6n'erat. 
exorbitance, egzor'bitans. 
exorbitant, egzor'bitant. 
exordium, egzor'dium. 
exosmosis, eks5zmo'sis. 
exoteric, eksSter'ik. 
exotic, egz5t'ik. 
ex parte, eks par'te. 
expatriate, ekspa'triat. 



expedient, ekspe'dient. 

expert (adj.), eksp^rt'; 

(subst.), eks'p^rt. 

expiable, eks'peab'l. 

expletive, eks'pletiv. 

explicable, eks'plikab'l. 

exploit, eksploit'. 

This is the approved sound for 
both verb and substantive. 

explosive, eksplo'siv. 

exponent, ekspo'nent. 

expose, ekspoz'. 

ex post facto, eks post 

fak'to. 
exquisite, eks'kwizit. 
extant, eks'tant. 
extempore, ekstem'pSrg. 
extol, ekst61', gkstol'. 
extra, eks'tra. 
extraordinary, gkstror'di- 

n^ri. 
extricable, eks'trikS,b'l. 
exuberance, egziu'berans. 
exuberant, egziu'bSrant. 
exudd; eksiud', 6gziud'\ 
exult, egziilt'. 
exultancy, egziil'tansi. 
exultant, egzul'tant. 
exultation, eksiilta'shttn. 
eyedent (Scot.), I'dent. 
Eylau, i'lou. 
Eyre (Jane), dr. 



6hr, iu=u in use, <irn, up, circiSs, menfl, food, f6&t, out, oil, a^gle, part, thint 
^at, a?ure, CH=sQerm, ich, ^ (Fr.) mon, ^ee complete key, pages 15-20, 



F 



fa' (Scot.), f6. 

fablieau, fableo'. 

fagade, fasa-d'. 

facetiae, fSse'shie. 

facile, fas'il. 

facile princeps, f as'ile prin'- 



fac simile, fak sim'ile. 



faery, 



fa'eri. 



faerie, 

Fafnir, f^v'ner. 

Fagin, fa'gin. 

Fahrenheit, fa'renhit. 

faience, fa'yans'. 

faineant, fanaS^n'. 

Faineant, Les Rois, la- 

rw5,' fana&n'. 
fait accompli, fe'ta'konple'. 
faitour (Scot.), fa'ter, fa- 

toor'. 
faker, fa'k^r. 
fakir, f&ker', fa'k^f. 
falchion, fol'chun, fol'- 

shiln. 
falcon, f6'k'n, fol'kon. 
Falkland, f6k'land. 
Fallieres, falyar'. 

&le, senlite, cdre, St, accord, irm, ask, 
^Wre^ ovftr, Edin, ice, 111, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



fameuse, fa'mAz'. 

Sometimes called /amtwz'; per- 
haps it may be considered 
Anglicized as such. 

fancy, fan's!. 

Faneuil (Hall), fan^l, fSn'- 

yel. 
fanfaronade, fSnfarSnad'. 
fantasia, fantaze'a, fS-nti'-^ 
zlL 
Other forms are faniasie (Jdn'- 
tdz^) and fantaisie (Jdn'tazt). 

farandole, farS^ndol', far3,n'- 

dol. 
Famese, fS-rna'sa. 
Farquhar, f^r'kwar. 

In Middle Scots, guh had a 
rough or guttural wh sound as 
in quhen (when) . The spelling is 
obviously preserved in this name, 
and has doubtless influenced the 
sound. See note under assoilye. 

farrago, fara'go. 

Farrar (Geraldine), i&Tk\ 

Miss Farrar reports that she 
*^has always pronounced her 
name Farrah, accent on the last 
syllable, the two a^s as in far,'* 
(Quoted from a letter from her 
secretary in reply to an inquiry.) 

Farrar (Canon), far'ar. 
See Farrar (Geraldine). 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
cSffee, odd, connect, lemdn 6 (Germ.) 



EVEfKY-DAY PRO]NlTJlldlATXm ' •'!. ' ''^^ .IM 



fasces, fas'^S^. 
fascia, fash'ia. 
fascine, fSsen'. 
fashions (Scot.), fash'us. 
fast, fast, 
fasten, fas"n. 
fastidious, fastJd'ius. 
Fata Morgana, fS'tS, mdr- 

ga'nS;. 
fatima, fa'tSmi. 
Faubourg, St, Germain, 

foboor' sad zerman'. 
fauces, fo'sez- 
faucet, fo'set. 
Faucit (Helen), fo'sit. 
faugh, fo. 

faugh (Scot.), f6CH, faCH. 
faught (Scot.), foCHt. 
fault, f61t. 

Fauntleroy, fintleroi. 
Faure, for. 
fause (Scot.), fos. 
faut (Scot.), f6t. 
Fauteuil, fotti'y'- 
faux pas, fo p4'. 
Favre, Jules, ziil fa'vr'. 
Fayal, fi'al'. 
feaze, fez, faz. 
febrile, fe'bril, feb'ril. 
February, fSb'roo^ri. 
fecht (Scot.), fgCHt. 



feditin (Scot.), fgCH'in. 

fecit, fe'sit. 

fecund, fek'tind, fe'kiind. 

Fedora, fedo'rS. 

feeze, fez, faz. 

feid (Scot.), fed. 

feil (Scot.), feL 

feint, fant. 

Felice, fS,le'cha. 

Felicia, felish'ia, fglfeh'a. 

feline, fe^lin. 

felo de se, fe'Io dS sS'. 

felucca, feliik'a. 

feme-covert, fgm kiiv'^rt. 

So Anglicized a» a law tentf, 
and doubtless so pronounced 
even when spelled (as by Field- 
ing) femme convert, 

feme-sole, fem sol. 
A law term; sec feme-covert. 

femme de chambre, fam 

de shan'br\ 
femtir, fe'mur. 
Fenelon, fan^on', 
Fenwick, fgn'ik. 
feoff, fef . 
Femey, fernS^. 
Ferra'ra, ferr^'ri. 

Try to pronounce all the /s. 
Ferrero, Gugielmo, gool-* 

yel'mo ferra'ro. 
Try to pronounce all tbe r's. 



6hr, iu=u in use, Am, up, circds, iticnu, ffiod, fdot, out, oil, ai>gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ick, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 16-20; 



iCgfe i^ iXh s BV^RY-BAY PRONUNCIATION 



ferrocyanide, ferSsi'anid, 

fer6si'amd. 
Ferry, Jules, ztil fere'. 
Fesole, fes'ola. 

Cf. Fiesole. 
festina lente, festi'na len'tS. 
fete, fat; (Fr.), fat'. 

The French sound would be 
somewhere between jU and Jdty 
as if one were to try to prolong 
the ^ sound. 

fete champetre, fSt' shan- 

pa'tr'. 
See note on fete, 
fetish, fe'tish, fet'ish. 
Feuerbach, foi'erbaCH. 
feu follet, fo f6Ia'. 
feu grison, fo grezon'. 
feuillage, foeyaz'. 
Feuillant, foeyM'. 
feuille, foey'. 
feuille, feuillee, foeya'. 
Feuillet, Octave, 6ktav 

foeya'. 
feuilleton, foeyeton'. 
feu triste, fo trest'. 
fey (Scot.), fa. 
fiacre, fya'kr\ 
fiance, fe5,nsa'. 
fiancee, feS,nsa'. 
fiasco, fSas'ko. 
fiat, fi'at. 

ale, senllte, cdre, St, accord, irm, ask, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, 3(11, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



fiat lux, fi'at liiks. 

fibril, fi'bril. 

fibrin, fi'brin. 

Fichte, fiCHte. 

fichu, fish'oo; (Fr.), fe'shu', 

Fidelio, fedal'io. 

fiducial, fidiu'shal. 

fient (Scot.), fent. 

fier (Scot.), fer. 

Fierabras, fSarabra'. 

Fiesole, fyezSla. 

fiery (Scot.), fer'i. 

Figaro, fegaro'. 

figure, fig'iur. 

fikery (Scot.), fik'eri. 

filch, filch. 

filet de bceuf, fele' de buf. 

fille de chambre, fey' d6 

shan'br'. 
fin (Scot.), fin. 
finale, fSna'Ia. 
finance, finans', finans'. 
financier, finanser', fiuan'- 

si^r. 
fin de siecle fan de sye'kl'. 
fi'nis. 

finite, fi'nit. 
finochio, finokio. 
fiord, fyord. 
fireflaught (Scot.), fir'- 

fl6CHt, fir'flaCHt. 

sofa, lovable, eve, #vent, end, recent, 
c5ffee, 6dd, connect, lemdn, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



103 



Firenze, fergnt'sa. 
firlot (Scot.), Mr'lot, 
firman, Mr'mHn, ferm&n'. 
Firmin-Didot, f e r m 3. n ' 

ded6'. 
fite (Scot.), fit. 
Fiume, fyoo'ma. 
fjord, fyord. 
flaccid, flSk'sid. 
flagellant, fl^dz'elant, fla- 

dzel'ant. 
flageolet, flSdzSlet' fladz'- 

81et. 
flagitious, fllLdzish'fts. 
flagrant, fla'grant. 
flagrante delicto, flagran'- 

tS delic'tS. 
flainen (Scot.), flan'en. 
flambeau, flam'bo. 
Flameng, flaman'. 
Flammarion, flamarg6n'. 
flanerie, flan're'. 
flaneur, flan5r'. 
Flaubert, Gustave, giis'tav' 

flobar'. 
flaught (Scot.), fl5CHt, 

flaCHt. 
flaughter (Scot.), fl6CH'- 

ter, flaCHt'er. 
flaunt, flant, flont. 
Fleance, fleans. 



fleur-de-lis, flor d^ le'. 
fley (Scot.), fla. 
fleysome (Scot.), fla'sum. 
flichter (Scot.), fliCHtSr. 
flight (Scot.), fliCHt, 

fleCHt. 
fling (Scot.), fleng. 
flisk (Scot.), fl^sk. 
fliskmahoy (Scot.), flesk'- 

mahoi. 
flisky (Scot.), flgs'kS. 
flit (Scot.), flet. 
flite (Scot.), flit, 
fliting (Scot.), flit'in. 
flitter (Scot.), flet'gr. 
flocci, fl5k'si. 
flocculent, fl5k'iulSnt. 
Floreal, flSraal'. 
Florentine, flSr'gnten, flo'- 

rentin. 
florist, flo'rist, flSr'fet. 
flory (Scot.), flo'ri. 
Flotow, flo'to. 
flotsam, fl5t'sam. 
fluff-gib (Scot.), fluf gib. 
Foch, fSsh. 
foci, fo'si. 

fodgel (Scot.), fSdz'Sl. 
fog (Scot.), fSg. 
foggage (Scot.), fSg'lLdz. 



6fcr, iu=u in use, Am, ttp, circfts, menii, food, fd6t, out, oil, aijgle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH = Germ. tcA, 6 (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 

8 



104 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Folies Bergere, Les, la itW 

berzar'. 
folio, fo'Iio, fol'yo. 
fondant, f5n'dant; (Fr.), 

f6fidan'. 
Fontainebleau, fontSnblo'. 
Fontenoy, f 6 n t ' n w a '; 

(Ang.), f5nt'gnoi. 
foramen, fSra'men. 
forbad, forbad', 
forbear, f6rbdr', for'bar. 

The second is also given as 
the sound of the word when 
spelled forebear in the sense of 
ancestor. 

forecast (subst.), for'kast; 

(verb), forkast'. 
forecaster, forkas't^r. 
forecastle, for'kfe'l, fo'k's'l. 
forehead, f5r'ed. 
foresail, for'sal, for's'l. 
foretauld (Scot.), fSrt61d'. 
forfaim (Scot.), forfdrn', 
forfault (Scot.), f8r'f6t. 
forfoughten (Scot.), for- 

foCHt'gn. 
forgie (Scot.), forge', 
formidable, for'midSb'l. 
Fomarina, La, la f6rnS,re'- 

na. 
forpit (Scot.), for'pet. 

ale, senate, c^re, at, accord, Srm, Ssk, 
there, ovdr, Ed6n, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Fors Clavigera, f6rz klS,vi'- 

dzera. 
forspeak (Scot.), f6rspek'. 
forte (subst.), fort; (adj.), 

for'ta. 
forthwith, forthwith', 
fortissimo, fSrtis'imo. 
fortnight, fort'nit, fort'nit. 
forum, fo'rum. 
Foscari, f5s'kare. 
fother (Scot.), foth'^r. 
fou (Scot.), foo. 
Foucault, fooko'. 
Fouche, foosha'. 
foughten (Scot.), foCHt'en. 
foulard, foolard'; (Fr.), fool- 

ar'. 
Fouquier-Tinville, fookya' 

tanvel'. 
fourchette, foorshet'. 
Fra Angelico, irk &ndz61§- 

ko. 
Fra Bartolommeo, irh bS-r- 

tSlSmme'o. 
fracas, f ra'kas ; (Fr.) , f raka'. 
Fra Diavolo, fr^ d§S,'v61o. 
fragile, fradz'il. 
fragmentary, frag'ment&ri. 
franc, frank. 
France, Anatole, 3,nat61' 

frans. 

sofS, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
cSffee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



105 



Frances, fran's^s, fran'sez. 
Francesca da Rimini, fran- 

cheska da remfene. 
Franchi, fran'ke. 
franchise, fran'chiz, fran- 

chiz. 
franchisement, frSn'chiz- 

ment. 
Francis, fran'slfs. 
Frangois, fr&nsw§,'. 
Frangoise, fransw§;z'. 
franc tireur, fran' teror'. 
frangipane, fran'dzipan. 
frangipani, frandzipan'i, 

frandzipan'i. 
Frankfort am Main,frS.nk'- 

foort km min. 
frankincense, frank'insSns. 
Franz Ferdinand, frants 

ferdenand'. 
Franz Josef, frants yo'sSf . 
frappe, frapa'. 
frate, fra'ta. 
frater, frater. 
fraternal, frat^r'nal. 
fraternize, frat'e^Tiiz, frat'- 

emiz. 
fratricide, frSt'risid. 
frau, frou. 
fraulein, froi'lm. 
Fredegonde, fradag6nd'. 



Freiberg, fri'berCH. 
Freiburg, fri'boorCH. 
Freiligrath, fri'liCHrS^t. 
Freischiitz Der, der fri'- 

shtits. 
freit (Scot.), fret. 
Frelinghuysen, f r e ' 1 i n g - 

hizen. 
Fremont (John Charles), 

frgm5nt'. 
frequent (adj.), frfe'kwent; 

(verb), frSkwent'. 
Frere, frdr. 
Freud, froit. 
Freudian, froid'ian. 
Freund, froint. 
Frey (Elizabeth), fri. 
Freya, fra'S,. 
Freytag, Gustav, goostSv' 

fri'taCH. 
Fribourg, freboor'. 
fricht (Scot.), freCHt. 
Friedland (Battle of), fred'- 

lant. 
frien (Scot)., fren. 
Friesian, fre'zan. 
frijole, frShol'S. 
friseur, frezor'. 
frist (Scot.), frest. 
Froebel, fro'bel. 



6Ar, iu = u in use, Am, iip, circus, menu, f65d, fd6t, out, oil, aQgle, part, thin, 
that, apiire, GH=»G©rm, ich, ii (Fr.) mon^ Sw complete key, pages 15-20, 



106 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Froissart, frwasar; (Ang.), 

froi'sart. 
Front de Boeuf , f ron de buf '. 
Frontenac, de, d^ fronte- 

nak'; (Ang.), fr5n'tS- 

n£k. 
Froude, frood. 
fmmenty, froo'menti. 
fu' (Scot.), foo. 
Fuchs, Leonhard, la'on- 

h^rt fooCHs. 
fuchsia, fiu'shia. 
Fuegians, fiue'dz!ans. 
See Tierra del Fuego. ^ 



fugue, fiug. 

Fujiyama, foo'dzSya'ma. 

fuliginous, fiulidz'inus. 

fulsome, fulsum. 

funebral, fiun'ebral, fiune'- 

bral. 

The common form is funehrial 
(fiuneb'Ml). 

fungi, fun'dzi. 
fungicide, fun'dzisid. 
fureur, fiiror'. 

The English form is furor (fiu'- 
rdf); the Italian, /wrore (Jooro'rd), 

furr-ahin (Scot.), fur'ahin. 
Fiirst. 



ale, senSte, c&re, St, accord, Srm, Ssk, sofa, lovable, Eve, Svent, ^nd, recent, 
tl^fre, QYlr, Ed^ii, |ce, ;U, pjd, gljey, ^rb, C9ff^Q} 9^4? eP^nect, lemdn, o (Germ.) 



G 



gaberdine, gab^rden', gab'- 

erden. 
gaberlunzie (Scot.), gaber- 

liin'yi. 
See note on assoilzie. 

Gaboriau, fimile, amel' 

gaboryo'. 
Gabriel, ga'briel. 
Gabrielle, gabriel'. 
Gaby Deslys. 
See Deslys. 

Gadarenes, gadSlrenz'. • 
Gade, gS-'de. 
Gadski, gat'ski. 
Gaekwar, gik'wSr. 
gael, gal. 
Gaelic, gal'ik. 
Gaeta, gaa'ta. 
Gaia, ga'ya. 
Gaillard, gayar'. 
Gainsborough, ganz'b'rS. 
gair (Scot.), gar. 
Gairdner (James), gard'- 
nSr. 
Other families in England, 
however, are said to call it 
gdrdner or gdedne. 



gala, galS. 

Galahad (Sir), galahad.' 
Galapagos, gala'pagSs. ' 
Galashiels, galashelz'. 
Galatea, galate'S. 
Gales. 
See Principe de Gales. 

Galignani, galSnya'ne. 
Galilean, g3,lile'an. 
Galileo, gaffle'o; (Ital.), 

g5,lSla'o. 
gallant, gal'ant, galant'. 

"... the specialized senses 
* politely attentive to women,' 
and 'amorous, amatory', . . . 
are usually distinguished by the 
accentuation gallant' ^ — Oxford 
Dictionary. A similar distinc- 
tion is usually observed in the 
substantive; a sraZ'Zani is a brave 
man, a gallant' one who is 
politely attentive. 

Gallatin, gal'atin; (Fr.), 

galatSn'. 
Gallaudet, gal6det'. 
Gallegos, galya'gos. 
galligaskin, galigas'kin. 
Gallipoli, galli'p61e. 
Gallitzin, galet'sSn. 



bhr^ iu = u in use, <irn, iip, circus, menii, food, fd8t, out, oil, ai^gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. <cA, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



108 



EVERY-DAY PRONXJNCIATION 



gallivant, galivant'. 
galop, garop, garo. 
Galsworthy, golz'wurthi. 

The novelist, John Gals- 
worthy, so indicates the pro- 
nunciation of his name, as the 
old Devonshire sound of it, but 
speaks of the *' usual London 
pronunciation" (other famiUes) 
as gdWwUxM, 

Galway, gol'wa. 

Gama, Vasco da, vas'ko 

da g3,'ma. 
gamin, gSm'in; (Fr.), ga- 

rnSn'. 
gamut, gam'at. 
gangrene, gan'gren. 
gant (Scot.), gant. 
Ganymede, gS,n'imed. 
gaol, dzal. 
gape, gap, gap. 

British usage recognizes only 
the second. This is the only 
recognized form for noun or 
verb meaning yawn, Gdp mean- 
ing an opening or breach is a dif- 
ferent word. 

gar (Scot.), gar. 
garage, gar§,z', gar'lldz. 
Garcia, garthe'S,. 
gargon, garson'. 
Gargantua, gargan'tiua. 
Garibaldi, Giuseppe, dzoo- 

sep'pa garebal'de. 
garish, gdr'ish. 

ale, senate, cftre, at, accord, arm, 3sk, 
there, ovdr, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Garonne, gar8n'. "^ 
garrotte, garot', garrot'. 
garrulity, garool'iti. 
gasconade, gaskonad'. 
gasoline, gas'olen. 

The dictionaries also allow 
gds'oUn^ but one never hears 
it in use. 

gasometer, gasSm'eter. 
Gaston, gas'ton; (Fr.), gas- 
ton'. 
The first represents the Ameri- 
can family name; the second, 
the French baptismal name. 

gastritis, gastrit'is. 
Gatun, gatoon'. 
gaucherie, gosh're. 
Gaucho, gou'cho. 

The Spanish sound might be 
more nearly represented by 
gdoo'chJo, 

gauge, gadz. 
gaunt, gant, gont. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

gauntlet, gant'let, gont'let. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

Gautama, go'tama ; (Hind.) , 

gou'tama. 
Gautier, gotya'. 
gavelkind, ga'v'elkind. 
Gawain (Sir), go'waLn. 
Gebir, dze'bir, ga'ber. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



109 



Gehenna, giShen'a. 

Geikie (James), ge'ki. 

geisha, ga'sha. 

geissler (tube), gis'ler. 

geizen (Scot.), giz"n. 

geld. 

gelding, gel'ding. 

gelid, dzel'id. 

Gelon, dze'15n. 

gemel, dzem'el. 

Gemini, dzem'ini. 

Gemsbok, gemz'bok. 

gendarme, zandarm'. 

genealogize, dzen§ar6dziz. 

genealogy, dzeneal'Sdzi, 

dzeneal'ftdzi. 
generic, dzener'ik. 
Genesareth, gSnes'argth. 
Genesis, dzen'Ssis. 
Genest, zene'. 
Genevieve, dzen'fevev'. 

The French form, Genevikve, is 
pronounced ?^neve^v'. 

Genevra, dzgnev'ra. 
Genghis Khan, dzgn'giz 

CHan'. 
genie, dze'ni. 

"The word geenie was adopted 
by the French translators of the 
Arabian Nights as the rendering 
of the Arabic word which it 
resembled in sound and in 
sense. In English genie has 



been commonly used in the sin- 
gular and genii in the plural." — 
Oxford Dictionary. 

GeSnie is pronounced ^ne\ 
The Arabic word is represented 
in EngUsh by Jinnee {d^lne'), 

genii, dze'nii. 

See also genie, 
genius loci, dze'nifis lo'si. 
Genlis, de, d^ z&nles'. 
Gennesaret (Lake), dzenSs'- 

Sret. 
genre, zhi'v\ 
gens, dzSnz. 
Genseric, dzen'sMk. 
gentes, dzen'tez. 
Gentile, dzen'til. 
genuflection, dzgniuflSk'- 

shfin. 
genuine, dzjgn'iuin. 
Geoffrey, dzjef'ri. 
geordie (Scot)., dzj6r'di. 
Georg, ge8rCH'. 
Georges, z6rz. 
Georgics, dz6rdz'iks. 
Geraint (Sir), dzerant'. 
Geraldine, dzgr'aldin. 
Gerard, dzer'ard, dzSrard'. 

The French form, Gerard, is 
pronounced 7^rdr\ 

gerfalcon, dzer'f6ken. 

Gergesenes, gtir'gSsenz. 

Gerhardt (chemist), zarar'. 



o/ir, iu=u in use, Am, up, circus, menu, food, foot, out, oil, ai?gle, part, thin, 
that, azure, CH = Germ, ich^ n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20, 



110 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Gerhardt vpoet), ger'hart. 
germane, dzerman', dztlr'- 

man. 
Gerome, zarom'. 
Geronimo, dz§r5n'im6. 
Gerry, ger'i. 

gerrymander, geriman'der. 
genmd, dzer'und. 
Gervinus, gerve'noos. 
Geryon, dzer'ion. 
Gesenius, gSza'nSoos; 

(Ang.), gese'nius. 
gest, dzest. 

So pronounced, also, when 
spelled geste. 

Gesta Romanorum, dzes'ta 

romano'rum. 
gesten (Scot.), ges'ten, 

ges'^n. 

Gethsemane, gethsem'ane. 

ghaut, got; (Hind.), ghat. 

Ghazi, gaz'i. 

In Kipling's lines, 

"Oh, it drives me half crazy 
To think of the days I 
Went slap for the Ghazi, 
My sword at my side," 

the first and third lines rhyme 
better than the second and third. 

Gheber, ge'ber, ga'bSr. 
Gheezeh, ge'ze. 

Commonly spelled Gizeh. 

Ghent, gent. 

ale, senate, c&re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, over, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, drb. 



gherkin, ger'kin. 

Ghetto, get'o. 

Ghibelline, ^b'elin, gib'- 

elin. 
Ghiberti, gSber'te. 
Ghirlandajo, gerlandS,'yo. 
Ghizeh, ge'ze. 

More commonly spelled Gizeh, 
ghoul, gool. 
Giacomo, dza'k6mo. 
Gianicolo, Monte, mSn'ta 

dzane'kolo. 
giaour, dzour. 

The Turkish pronunciation is 
more like gyour, 

gib (cat), gib. 

gibber, dzib'er, gib'er. 

gibberish, gib'erish. 

gibbet, dzib'et. 

gibbose, ^bos'. 

gibbous, gib'us. 

gibe, dzlb. 

Gibeonite, gib'eonit. 

giblet, dzib'let. 

Gibraltar, dzibrSl'tar. 

Gide, zed. 

gie (Scot.), ge. 

Giessbach, ges'b3.CH. 

gif (Scot.), ^L 

gigantean, dzigante'an. 

Gila, he'la. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, ^nd, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



111 



Gil Bias de Santillane, zel 
bias' de SS^n'teyan'. 

The Spanish name of the book 
and the hero is pronounced in 
French because the book is 
French. The best usage favors 
the sound indicated here, but 
does not frown on ^el bld\ 

Giles, dzilz. 

gill, gil. 

So pronounced when meaning 
a fish's organ of respiratioriy a 
glen, a brook, and in a few techni- 
cal and local senses. 

gill, dzil 

So pronounced when meaning 
a fourth of a pint, a lass or 
wench, and in one or two obso- 
lete and dialect senses. 

gillie (Scot.), ^I'l. 
gilly-flower, dziriflou^r. 
gilravage (Scot.), gilrav'- 

adz. 
gimbal, ^m'bal, dzim'bal. 

The Oxford Dictionary recog- 
nizes only the first. 

gimmer (Scot.), gim'er. 

The word so pronounced 
means a young ewe. There is 
an old dialect word gimmer, 
pronounced d^lm'meTj meaning 
a hinge. 

gin, gin, dzm. 

It is pronounced gin as mean- 
ing if in Scots, and as a con- 
traction for begin. It is pro- 
nounced dzln as the name of a 
kind of Uquor, or as meaning 



a machine. The Scots word 
meaning against is pronounced 

Ginevra, dzenev'ra. 
gingival, dzin'dzival, dzin- 

dzi'val. 
gingle (Scot.), dzing'l. 
Gioconda, La, 1& dzSkon'- 

da. 
Giordano Bruno, dzSrda'- 

no broo'no. 
Girogione, dzOrdzo'na. 
Giotto, dzot'to. 
Giovanni^ dzovan'ne. 
Giralda, hgr'ai'dfi,. 
girandole, dzir'and81; (Fr.), 

zerahdSr. 
Girard, dzirard'. 
Girardin, zerardan'. 
Girofle-Girofia, z e r o fl a ' 

zerofla'. 
Girolamo, dzSro'lamo. 
Gironde, zerond'. 
Girondin, zerondan'. 
Girondist, dziron'dist. 
gist, dzist. 
Giulia, dziu'lia. 
Giuliana, dziuliS^'na. 
Giulio Romano dzool'yo 

rQman'o. 
Giuseppe, dzoosep'a. 



ohr, iu=u in use, Arn, up, circus, menii, fcx)d, foot, out, oil, aijtgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ. ich^ t. (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



112 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Gizeh, ge'ze. 
glace, glasa'. 
glacier, gla'sher, gl^'sier. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

glacis, gla'sis, glas'is. 

gladiolus, g 1 a d i ' 6 1 u s , 

gladio'lus. 

glar (Scot.), glar. 

gleib (Scot.), gleb. 

gley (Scot.), gli, gle. 

See also agley. 
gliff (Scot.), glef. 
glissade, glis&d', glissad'. 
Gloucester, gISs'ter. 
glour (Scot.), glour. 
Gluck, Gliick, glook, gltik. 

Yon is pronounced /on. 
glycerine, glis'erin. 
glycogen, gli'kodzen. 
Glyptotheca, glipt6the'ka. 
Gneisenau, g'ni'z^nou. 
gneiss, nis. 

Gneist, von, fon g'nist'. 
gnomic, no'mik, n6m'ik. 
gnomon, no'mSn. 
gnostic, nSs'tik. 
gnu, noo, niu. 
Gobi, go'be. 
Godiva, g8di'vS-. 
Goeben, gob'en. 

ale, senate, cSre, at, accord, Srm, ask, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Goelet, golet'. 
Goethals, go'talz. 
Goethe, von, f6n go'te. 
Goetz, gots. 
goiter, goi'ter. 
Golconda, g51k5n'da. 
Golgotha, g51'g6tha. 
Goliath, goirath. 
gomeral (Scot.), gSm'eral. 
gondola, g5n'd61a. 
gonfalon, gon'fS,16n 
Gorchakov. 
See GortchakofF. 

Gordian, gor'dian. 
Gorizia, gOrits'ia. 
Gorki, gor'kS. 
gormand, gor'mand. 
More commonly gcmrmand, 

Gortchakoff, gor'chakof. 

So pronounced, also, when 
spelled Gortchakov or Gortchakow, 

goshawk, gos'hok. 
Gotama, g6'tama. 
Gotha, go'ta. 

Gotham, got'am, go'tham. 
The first is the name of an 
English village; the second, the 
nickname of New York City, 
which is also sometimes pro- 
nounced gdth'dm, 

Gotterdammerung, goter- 

dem'eroong. 
Gottingen, got'inen. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, <5nd, recSnt, 
coffee, odd, connect, lem6n, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



113 



Gott mit uns, got mit o&ns. 
Gottschalk, got'shalk. 
goud (Scot.), goud, god. 
Gough, gof. 
goulash, goo'lash. 
Gounod, goo'nS'. 
gourd, gord, goord. 
gourmand, g oo r ' m a n d , 

goormah'. 
See also gormand. 
gourmet, goorme'. 
goustrous (Scot.), gous'- 

trus. 

gousty (Scot.), goos'ti. 

gout, gout. 

gout, goo. 

goutte (Scot.), goot. 

gouvemante, goovernant'. 

The form govemante is set 
down as obsolete. Its sound is 
variously represented as guv'- 
Srndnty guvemant^ goovirndnt. 

Gouvemeur, goov^rnoor', 

gooverner', goovernor'. 

The first is its sound as the 
name of a town in New York; 
the last represents the French 
sound; it is sounded in all three 
ways as an American family 
name, but most commonly the 
second. 

govemante. 

See gouvemante. 

gowan (Scot.), gou'an. 

bhvy iu=u in use, Am, up, circus, menii, food, f66t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



gowd (Scot.), goud, god. 
gowden (Scot.), goud'en. 
Gower, gou'er, gor. 
gowf (Scot.), gouf. 

Also written gowff, but has 
the same sound. 

gowk (Scot.), gouk, gok. 
gowked (Scot.), gouk'ed, 

gok'ed. 
gowpen (Scot.), gou'pen, 

go'pen. 
grace a Dieu, gra'sa dyo'. 
Gracias a Dios, gra'theas 

k de'Ss. 
gracile, gras'il. 
gracioso, grasMo'so; (Sp.), 

grathso'so. 
graddan (Scot.), grad'an. 
Gradisca, gradSs'ka. 
graff (Scot.), graf. 
grail, gral. 
gramercy, gramer'si. 

As the name, however, of the 
park in New York, it is pro- 
nounced grdm^erd. 

Gramont, de, de gramon'. 
gran (Scot.), gran, 
granary, gran'lLri. 
Grande Chartreuse, La, la 

grand' shartroz'. 
grande passion, grand' pas- 

y6n'. 



114 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



grandiose, gran'dios. 
Grand Monarque, Le, le 

gran monark'. 
Grand Prix de Paris, gran 

pre' de pare', 
grat (Scot.), grat. 
Gratiano, grashia'no. 
gratis, gra'tis. 
gravamen, grava'men. 
Gravelotte (Battle of), 

gravl&t'. 
grease, gres. 
greasy, grez'i, gres'i. 

Daniel Jones (An English Pro- 
nouncing Dictionary) notes that 
in England ^'many speakers use 
the forms gre'sl and gre'zl with 
a difference of meaning, gre'st 
having reference merely to the 
presence of grease, and gre'zi 
having reference to slipperiness 
caused by grease. Thus with 
such speakers a candlestick 
might be gre'sX {i. e., covered 
with candle grease) without 
necessarily being gre'zi^ while a 
road might be gre'zt (i, e., sHp- 
pery) without being exactly 
gresV 

Greenwich (England), 

grin'idz. 

In the United States common- 
ly gren'Mch, 

greeshoch (Scot.), gre'- 
shuCH. 

ale, senate, c^re, St, accord, arm, ask, 
there, over, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



grenade, grgnad', grenad. 

The Oxford Dictionary gives 
only the second. 

Grenoble, greno'b'l. 

Greuze, groz. 

Greville (Eng.), grev'il ; 

(Fr.), gravel'. 
Grevy, grave', 
grice (Scot.), gris. 
Grieg, reg. 
grien (Scot.), gren. 
grieshoch (Scot.), gre'- 

shuCH. 
Grimaldi, grgmal'de. 
grimalkin, grimal'kin, 

grimorkin. 
Grindelwald, grin'delvalt. 
gripe, grip, 
grisly, griz'li. 
gristly, gris'li. 
grizzly, griz'li. 
Grodek, groo'dek. 
Grodno, grod'no. 
Grolier, grolya', gro'lya. 
Groot, grot. 
Grosvenor, grov'ner. 
Grotius, gro'shius. 
Grouchy, de, de grooshe'. 
grousome (Scot.), groo'sum. 
grunzie (Scot.), groon'yi. 
See note on assoilzie. 

8ofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



115 



Gruyere, griiyar'. 
Guadalajara, gwatfealaha'- 
ra. 
So in Spain, but in Mexico, 
gwMdldhd'rd. 

Guadalquivir, godalkwiv'- 

^r. (Sp.), gwatfealke'- 

ver. 
Guadalupe (Sp.), gwafeal- 

oo'pa; (Mex.), gwada- 

loo'pa; (Ang.), goda- 

loop', godaloo'pi. 
guaiacum, gwi'akum. 
Guam, gwam. 
guanaco, gwana'ko. 
guano, gw§,'no. 
Guantanamo, gwSntS-'nS,- 

mo. 
guarantee, garante'. 

This is the only approved 
pronunciation for both sub- 
stantive and verb. 

guarantor, gar'antor. 

guaranty, gar'anti. 

Guardafui (Cape), gwar- 

dMwe'. 
Guatemala, gwatSma'la. 
guava, gwa'va. 
Guayaquil, gwiakel'. 
gubernatorial, giub^rna- 

to'rial. 
gude (Scot.), gild. 

ohr, iu = u in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, food, f56t, out, oil, apgle, paft, thin, 
tHat, a^yre, Cli-QQrmt icA, ti (Fr.) ww, See complete key, pages 15-20, 



gudeman (Scot.), giidman'. 
gudewife (Scot.), glidwif. 
gudgeon, giidz'un. 
guelder, gel'der. 
Guelph, gwelf. 
Guendolen, gwen'dftlen. 
Guercino, gwerche'no. 
guerdon, gtir'dun. 
Guericke, von, fOn ga'rike. 
Guerin, de, de garan'. 
Guernsey, gtlrn'zi. 
Guerriere, La, la geryar'. 
guerrilla, geril'a'. 
guesten (Scot.), ges^n. 
Gueux, go. 

Guglielmo, goolySl'mo. 
Guiana, gea'na. 
Guicciardini, gwecharde'- 

ne. 
Guiccioli, gwech6'le. 
Guichard, geshar'. 
guidon, gi'diin. 
Guido Reni, gwe'do ra'ne. 
guild, gild. 

As a family name, Guild is 
most commonly pronounced gild. 

Guildenstem, gil'denstem. 
Guildford, ^I'ferd, gild'- 
ferd. 
The first is the accepted Brit- 
ish sound; both are used in the 
United States. 



116 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



guildhall, gild'h61. 

Guillaume, geyom'. 

guillemot, gil'SmSt. 

guillotine, ^I'&ten, gilSten'. 

British usage favors the sec- 
ond. 

guimpe, gamp, gSnp 

The English word is gimp; 
there is no reason for preferring 
the form that is partly or wholly 
French. 

guinea, gin'i. 

The sound is the same whether 
the word be common noun, 
proper noun, or adjective. 

Guiney, gi'ni. 
Guiniver, gwin'gver. 
Guinivere, gwin'gver. 
Guinness, gin'Ss. 
Guiscard, geskar'. 
Guiscardo, gwiskar'do. 
guise, giz. 
Guise, gtiez', gez. 
Guizot, gez6'. 
gulash, goo'lish. 
gulden, gool'den. 
gules, giulz. 
gulravage (Scot.), goolrav'- 

S,dz. 
gum arable, gum ^r'abik. 
Gimther, goon'tSr. 
guse (Scot.), giis. 
Gustavus, giistaVfis. 

ale, senite, cftre, St, accord, Srm, Ssk, 
th8re» ov^r, Ed^n, ice, KU, old, dbey, 6rb, 



Gustavus Adolphus, gus- 

taVtis, ^dorfus. 
Gustavus Vasa, gustaVus 

va'sa, goost&Voos. 
gutcher (Scot.), gtich'er. 
Gutenberg, goot'enberCH. 
Gutierrez, gootiar'Sth. 
Guyana, gean'a. 
Guyandotte, geS,nd6t'. 
Guyon, gi'on; (in Spenser), 

ge'5n; (Fr.), giiyon'. 
Guyot, ge'yft; (Fr.), guey6'. 
Guzman de Alrafache, 

gooth'man' da alf&r^'- 

cha. 
As a Spanish-American name 
Guzman would be pronounced 
goos'mdn, 

gybe, dzib. 

Gyges, gi'dzez, dzi'dzez. 

gymkhana, dzimka'na. 

gynaeceum, dzinSse^um, 

dzinSse^flm. 
gynecologist, dzinfekSl'- 

odzist. 
gynecology, dzinSkol'Sdzi. 
gynoecium, dzine'siflm. 
gyrate, dzi'rat. 
gyration, dzira'shun. 
gyre (Scot.), gir. 
gyrfalcon, dztir'fok'n. 
gyroscope, dzi'rSskop. 

sofS, lov&ble, eve, ivent, end, recent, 
cSffee, 6dd, connect, lemin, 6 (Germ.) 



H 



Haakon, ho'kSn. 
Haarlem, har'lem. 
Haas, has. 

Habakkuk, habak'uk, hab'- 
akuk. 

Habana, h^va'na. 

The Spanish h is usually *' bi- 
labial," pronounced with the lips 
together instead of with the 
lower lip against the upper teeth. 
It is written b or v; as Viscaya, 
Biscaya, Vicente, Bisente, See 
also Havana. 

habeas corpus, ha'b^as 

kor'pus. 
habergeon, hab'^rdzCin, 

haber'dzun. 
Habitant, abetan'. 
habitat, hab'itat. 
habitue, habit 'iua' 

abetlia'. 
hacienda, asyen'da, hasien'- 

da. 
hsec olim meminisse juva- 

bit, hec o'lim memi- 

nis'e dziuva'bit. 
Haelen, hi'len. 
haematin, he'matm hem'- 

atin. 



(Fr.), 



haemato, hem'atS, he'mato. 
haemoglobin, hem6glo'bin. 
Haensel iind Gretel, hen'zel 

o&nt gra'tel. 
haet (Scot.), hat. 
Hafiz, hS^'flz, hMez\ 
Hagar, ha'glir. 
Haggai, hag'ai, hag'i. 
hagiarchy, hag'iS^rki, 

hadz'iarkl. 
hagiocracy, hagi5k'rasi, 

hadzi5k'rasi. 

Hague (The), hag. 

Haidee, hide'. 

Hainan, hi'nan'. 

Hainaut, eno'. 

hairst (Scot.), harst. 

Haiti, ha'ti. 

Haitian, ha'tian. 

haiver (Scot.), ha'ver. 

Hakluyt, hak'loot. 

halcyon, hal'siun. 

Halcyone, halsi'6ne. 

Halevy, alave'. 

halibut, h5ribut, hal'ibut. 

Dictionaries prefer the second; 
those who catch, sell, or eat the 
fish use only the first. 



ohr, iu=u in use, (irn, up, circus, menii, food, f66t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20, 



118 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Halicamassus, halikarnas'- 

us. 
Halicz, ha'Hch. 
halite, hal'it, ha'lit. 
hallion (Scot.), hal'yun, 

h6ryan. 
hals (Scot.), h6Is. 
Hals, Franz, frants hals. 
haly (Scot.), ha'li. 
Ham (Ft. village), am. 
hamadryad, ham'adriad. 
hamadryades, h^madri'- 

adez. 
Hamelin, ha'melin. 
Hamilcar Barca, hamil'- 

kar bar'ka. 
Handel, han'del. 
Handel, hgn'del. 
hangar, han'ga^r; (Fr.), an- 

gar'. 
Hans Sachs, bans zS,CHs. 
Hapsburg, haps'b^rg; 

(Ger.), haps'boorCH. 
harakiri, ha'rake're. 
harass, har'as. 
harbinger, har'bindzer. 
Hardinge, harding. 
Hardwich (U. S.), hM'- 

wik. 
hareem, harem'. 
harem, ha'rem. 

ale, senate, c&re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ovfcr, Edin, ioe, 111, old, 6bey, drb 



Harfloeur, arflor'. 
haricot, har'iko, hSr'ik5t. 
Harleian, harle'an, hS,i:'- 

Isan. 
Harlequin, h^r'lgkw!n,har'- 

lekin. 
Haroun - al - Raschid, ha- 

roon-ar-rashed' ; (Ang.) , 

haroon'-alr^sh'id. 

Harpagon, S^rpagon'. 

Harpocrates, harp6k'ratez. 

harpsichord, harp'sikord. 

harquebus, hark'webtis. 

harst (Scot.), harst, hdrst. 

hartebeest, har'tebest. 

Also written hartbeest and 
pronounced Mft'hesL 

Hartmannsweiler, h S r t ' - 

mansvil'er. 
Hartz, harts, 
haruspex, harus'peks. 
haruspice, harus'pis. 
Harwich (England), har'- 

idz, har'ich. 
Hasdrubal, has'droobal. 
haugh (Scot.), hoCH. 
haim (Scot.), ban, hon. 
haunt, hant, hont. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

Hauptmann, houpt'man. 

sofa, lovable, eve, ivent, ^nd, recSnt, 
, c5ffee, 6dd, cfinnect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



119 



Haussmann, osman'. 
hautboy, ho'boi. 
hauteur, hStiir' ; (Fr.) , otor'. 
Havana, hava'nS,. 
See also Habana. 

haver (Scot.), ha'v^r. 
Haverhill, ha'v^ril. 
Havre, Le, 1^ av'r\ 
Havre de Grace (U. S.), 

hav'er dfe gras. 
Hawaii, h§,wi'e. 
Hawaiian, h5.wi'y3,n. 

Hawarden, h&'ed'n. 

Jones gives also M'd^n^ hd'd^n, 
and hd'wed'n, 

Haydn, ha'd'n; (Ger.), hi'- 

den. 
Haye, La, la a'. 
Haye Sainte, La, 15, a sant. 
Hayti, ha'ti. 

healsome (Scot.), hal'siim. 
hearth, hapth. 
heart-scald (Scot.), hert'- 

skold, hert'skod. 
heaume, horn, 
hebdomadal, h e b d 6 m ' - 

adal. 
Hebe, he'bS. 
Hebert, abar'. 
hebetudinous, hgbStiu'di- 

nus. 



Hebraism, he'braizm. 
Hebraist, he'braist. 
Hebrides, heb'ridez. 
Hecate, hek'ate. 

In Milton and Shakespeare 
usually hek'dL 

hecatomb, hgk'itSm, hek'- 

atoom. 
hech (Scot.), heCH. 

So pronounced as an exclama- 
tion; as meaning a hayrake it is 
Mk. 

hecht (Scot.), heCHt. 
hectoliter, kek'tSlet^r. 
Hecuba, hek'iublL. 
Hedone, hedo'ne. 
hedonism, he'donizm, hSd'- 
onizm. 
The Oxford Dictionary recog- 
nizes only the first. 

Hegel, ha'gel. 

Hegelian, hSga'lian, h§ge'- 

lian. 
hegemonic, hedzem5n'ik, 

hedzemSn'ik. 
hegemony, hedzem'6ni. 
hegira, hgdzi'rS, hedz'ira. 

The second is "correct" his- 
torically, and the favorite of the 
lexicographers, but it is seldom 
used. 

Heidelberg, hi'delberCH. 
heigh-ho, ha'ho, hi'ho. 



bhr, iu«=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, f6od, fd6t, out, oil, aqgle, paft, thin, 
that, aiipure, CH = Germ. »cA, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-^20. 

9 



120 



EVEKY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Heine, Heinrich, hin'riCH 

hi'n^. 
heinous, ha'nfis. 
Helena, hel'ena. 
Helenus, herenfis. 
Helgoland, hel'gOlant. 

In English commonly Heligo- 
land (MVigdl&nd). 

Heliogabalus, heli8gab'a- 

lus. 
Hellas, hel'as. 
hellebore, hgrSbor. 
Hellene, hel'en. 
Hellenic, helen'ik. 
Hellespont, hel'espSnt. 
Hellespontine, helespSn'tin, 

helespSn'tln. 
Helmholtz, ham'hfilts. 
Heloise, al6ez'. 
helot, hgr6t, he'lot. 
helotry, hel'otri, hea8tri. 
Helvetia, helve'shiJ. 
Helvetian, hSlve'shan. 
Helvetius, helve'shifis ; 

(Fr.), elvasSiis'. 
hemans, hem'anz. 
hematite, hSm'atit, he'- 

matit. 

So pronounced, also, when 
written hoematite, 

ale, senate, c&re, St, accord, Srm, ask, 
there, ovftr, Eden, ice, fll, 51d, obey, 6rb, 



hemato (prefix), hgm'&tS. 
he'matS. 
So pronounced, also, when 
written hoemato, 

hemistich, hem'istik. 
Hengest, hen'gest. 
Henlopen (Cape), hen- 

lo'pen. 
Henri, anre'. 
Henriade, La, la anread'. 
Henriot, anreo'. 
Henriques, enre'kes. 
Henriquez, anre'kath. 
Hephaestus, hefes'tus. 

Anyone who writes the name 
Hephaistos means to indicate the 
Greek sound, hefls'tds. 

Heptateuch, hep'tatiuk. 
Hera, he'ra. 
Heraclean, hSrakle'an. 
Heracleian, herlLkle'yS-n, 

herakli'an. 
Heracles, her'§,klez. 
Heraclidse, herakli'dg. 
Heraclitean, heraklite'an. 
Heraclitus, hgrakli'tus. 
heraldic, heral'dik. 
herb, erb, herb. 

British usage recognizes only 
the second; American usage pre- 
fers the first. 

herbaceous, h^rba'shiis. 
herbage, er'bSdz, her'badz. 

sofa, lov&ble, eve, event, J5nd, recent, 
coflFee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVEKY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



121 



herbal, h^r'bal. 
Herculaneum, herkiula'- 

nSum. 
Herculean, herkiu'lSan. 
He're. 
hereditament, hSredit'-i 

ment. 
Hereford, her'Sferd. 
heresiarch, her'Ssi5,rk,h§re'- 

siark. 
hereunto, heruntoo'. 
herewith, her with'. 

Herv^th^ is also allowed by 
some American authorities. 

hermaphrodite, h^rmaf- 

r6dlt. 
hermeneutics, h^rmSniu'- 

tiks. 
Hermione, h^rmi'Sne. 
Hernandez, arn3,n'dSth. 
Hemani, Srni'nS. 
Hero, he'ro. 
Herod, her'od. 
Herodian, hSro'dian. 
Herodias, hSro'dias. 
Herodotus, hSr5d'6t&s. 
heroine, her'SIn. 
Herr, hSr. 
Herren, her'en. 
Herschel, h^r'shel. 



Hertford, ha'fed, hat'fed. 

This is the British pronuncia- 
tion for ^er^/brcfe/iire (haJedsMe), 
or for Hertford College, Oxford. 

Hertz, herts. 

Herzegovina,hertsSg6ven&'. 
Hesiod, he'siod, he'shiod. 
Hesione, h^si'6ne. 
Hesperides, hSspSr'Mez. 
Hesse, hes, hSs'i, hSs'e. 

The first is American; the sec- 
ond, British; the third, German. 

Hesse-Cassel, h^s' kas'el, 

hes'e k5,s'el. 
hetaera, hSte'rA. 
See also hetaira. 

hetserism, hSte'riz'm. 
hetaira, h^ti'rS,. 
heterogeneity, hSt^rSdz- 

gne'iti. 
heterogeneous, hgtSrSdze'- 

nSus. 
Het Sas. 

heuch (Scot.), hooCH. 
heugh (Scot.), hooCH, 

hiuCH. 
heuk (Scot.), hiuk. 
hexastich, heks'^stik. 
Hexateuch, heks'lLtiuk. 
Heyne, hi'nS. 
hiatus, hia'tfis. 



ohr, iu=u in use, Arn, ^p, circiis, menu, f55d, fd6t, out, oil, apgle, paft, thin, 
that, ayure, CU~Qerro, iQh, ii (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pagea 15-20, 



122 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



hiccough, hik'up. 

The Oxford Dictionary spells 
it hiccup, with the note, ^^ Hic- 
cough was later spelling, ap- 
parently under the erroneous 
impression that the second syl- 
lable was cough, which has not 
iiffected the received pronuncia- 
tion, and ought to be abandoned 
as a mere error." 

hie et ubique, hie et iubi'- 

kw§. 

"There is a word you often see, pro- 
nounce it as you may — 

*You bike,' 'you bykwe,' 'ubbikwe* 
— alludin* to R. A. 

It serves 'Orse, Field, an' Garrison as 
motto for a crest, 

An' when you've found out all it means 
I'll tell you 'alf the rest." 

Kipling {Ubigue.) 

hich (Scot.), hiCH. 
hicht (Scot.), hiCHt. 
hie jacet, hik dza'set. 
Hieronymus, hier5n'-imus. 
hight (Scot.), hgCHt. 
highwayman, hi'waman. 
hilarious, hila'rius, hila'- 
rifis. 
British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

hilarity, hiiar'iti, hilSr'iti. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

Hilary, Ml'Sri. 
Hildebrand, hil'dSbr^nd. 
Himalaya, himala'ya. 

Good practice is almost uni- 
versally in favor of this sound, 

ale, senate, cAre, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, over, Edf ^, ice, ill, old, 6l)ey, <^rb, 



but lexicographers call it *'less 
correct," and tell us we should 
say Mmd'ldyd, 

hinc illse lacrimse, hink 

il'le lak'rime. 
Hindoostan'. 

So pronounced, also, when 
spelled Hindustan, 

Hindoostani, hindoostan'e, 

hJnd&stan'e. 
hinterland, hin'terland. 
Hippocrates, hipSk'rlLtez. 
Hippoerene, hip'Skren. 
Hippolyta, hipSrita. 
Hjppolyte, hip51'ite. 
Hippolytus, hipS'litfts. 
Hippomenes, 'hipSm'enez. 
hippophagi, hip6f'5,dzi. 
hirsute, hSr'siut, hersiut'. 
hinmdine, hirun'din,hirun^ 

din. 
Hispaniola, hispanyo'lS. 
hissel (Scot.), hes'^. 
hissy (Scot.), h^z'L 
histie (Scot.), hesU 
histrionic, histriSn'ik. 
hizzie (Scot.), hez'i. 
Hoangho, hwangho'. 
Spelled also Hwangho. 

Hobbema, h5b'ema. 
Hobbes, h6bz. 
Hobbesian, hSb'zian. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, q44, con;ieQti lew^n, q (Germ,) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



123 



Hoboken, ho'boken. 
hoch (Ger.), h6CH. 
hod (Scot.), h6d. 
hoddie (Scot.), h6d'i. 
hogmanay (Scot.), h6g'- 

mana'. 
hog-shouther (Scot.), hSg- 

shootb'er. 
Hohenlohe, ho'enlo'6. 
Hohenstaufen, ho'enshtou'- 

fen. 
Hoheiizollem,ho'ents61'ern. 
Holbein, hSFbin. 
Holbom, ho'burn. 

Jones gives Holborn in London 
as When, 

hoik (Scot.), hok. 
holm, hom. 
holocaust, h5l'6k6st. 
Holofemes, h616fer'nez. 
Holstein, hol'shtin, hol'- 
stin, hol'sten. 
The first is the German pro- 
nunciation of the name of the 
Prussian duchy; the other two 
are its Anglicized forms as the 
name of a breed of cattle. 

Holyhead, hSl'ihed. 
Holyoke, hol'yok. 
Holyrood, h61'irood. 
homage, h5m'adz. 
Homburg, h6mboorCH. 



homegeneity, hom6dzSne'- 

iti. 
homicidal, h5m'isi'dal. 

This seems to represent the 
fact. The Oxford Dictionary 
gives only hdmtsid'dl, while 
American dictionaries give a 
primary stress on the first syl- 
lable and a secondary stress on 
the third. Poets from Pope to 
Tennyson seem to stress first 
and third about the same, as 
most of us doubtless do in 
speech, varying according to sen- 
tence modulation. See page 6. 

homme d'affaires, 6mda- 

far'. 
homme d'esprit, 6mdespre'. 
homceo (prefix), ho'mS6. 
homoeopath, ho'mS6path, 

h5m'S6path. 
homoeopathic, h o m 6 6 - 

path'ik. 
homoeopathist, homS6p'- 

athist. 
homoeopathy, homS5p'- 

atM. 
homogeneous, hom6dze'- 

nSus. 
homologous, hSm5l'6g&s. 
homologue, h5m'615g. 
homonym, h5m'6nim, ho'- 

mSnim. 
homoplasy, hSmSp'llLsi. 



bhr, iu=u in use, 6rn, iip, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, aijgle, paft, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH=Gerin. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



124 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



honi soit qui mal y pense, 
6'nS swa kS mal § 
p3,ns'. 

Honiton, h5n'itun. 

Honolulu, honoloo'loo. 

honorarium, 5n6ra'rium. 

hooch (Scot.), hooCH. 

hoof, hoof. 

Hogge, de, d^ ho'CH^. 

Hoogvliet, hoCHVlet. 

hoop, hoop. 

hoopoe, hoo'poo, hoop'o. 

Hoosier, hooz'er. 

Hopital, L', lopetal'. 

Horace, h5r'Ss. 

Horae, ho're. 

horizon, hSri'zun. 

horologe, h5r'61odz, h6r'- 
816dz. 
The Oxford Dictionary gives 

only the second. 

horoscope, h5r'6skop. 
hors concours, h6r kon- 

koor'. 
hors de combat, h5r d^ 

konba'. 
hors d'oeuvre, hor do'vr'. 
Hortense, Srtans'. 
Hosea, hSze'a. 
hospice, h5s'pis. 

Some dictionaries allow also 
hos'peSf but it is rare in practice. 

ale, senite, c&re, at, accord, Srm, ask, 
thgre, ov^r, Edfen, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



hospitable, h6s'pit^b'l. 
hospitably, h5s'pitAbli. 
hospital, hSs'pital. 
hospitaler, h5s'pitaler. 
hostage, hSs'tadz. 
hostel, hos'tel. 
hostelry, hSs'telr!. 
hostile, hos'tn. 
hostler, hSs'Ier, 5s'I6r. 
Hotel des Invalides, 6tel' 

dazanvaled'. 
Hotel de Ville, 6tel' de vel. 
houdie (Scot.), houd'i. 
Houdin, oodM'. 
Houdon, oodon'. 
houff (Scot.), houf. 
hough, hok. 

Commonly spelled hock. 

Hougomont, oogomon'. 
Hougoumont, oogoomoii'. 
houkit (Scot.), houk'Jt. 
houlet (Scot.), hoo'Iet. 
houp (Scot.), hoop, 
houri, hdo'ri, hou'ri. 
housewife, hous'wif, huz'- 

wif, huz'if. 
housewifery, hous'wif 'ri, 

huz'wifri. 
housewifeship(Scot.) ,hoos'- 

wifshJp. 
housie (Scot.), hoos'L 

sofS, lovable, eve, event, <5nd, recent, 
cSffee, odd, cSnnect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



125 



Houssaye, Arsene, arsan' 

oosa'. 
Houston, hiu'stun. 
Houyhnhnm, hooin"m, hu- 

in'^m. 
how (Scot.), hoo. 
howadji, houMz'i. 
howe-backit (Scot.), hou- 

bak'it. 

howff (Scot.), houf. 

howfing (Scot.), housing. 

howk (Scot.), houk. 

Hudibras, hiu'dibras. 

Huerta, wSr'ta. 

Huguenot, hiu'genSt. 

In the plural {Les Huguenots) 
as the name of an opera, it has 
the French sound, Idz ugHo. 

humble, hiim'bU. 
humor, hiu'mer, iu'mer. 
Hunjadi Janos, hoon'yodi 

ya'nosh. 
hushion (Scot.), hush'un. 

huswife, huz'if. 
See housewife. 
Huysman, hois'm3.n. 
Huysmans, iisman'. 
Hyacinthe, Pere, par eas- 

Mt'. 
hyacinthine, hiasin'thin. 
Hyades, hi'adez. 
hyaline, hi'alin. 



Hybla, hi'bla. 
hybrid, hi'brid. 
hydatid, hfdatid, hid'Stid. 
hydrangea, hidr^n'dzSa. 
hydropathic, hidrop^th'ik. 
hydropathist, hidr5p'a- 

thist. 
hydropathy, hidr6p'athi. 
Hygeia, hidze'ya. 
hygiene, hi'dzien, hi'dzen. 
hygienic, hidzien'ik. 
hygienist, hi'dzenist. 
hygrometer, higrSm'ster. 
Hyksos, hik'sos, hik's5s. 
Hylas, hi'las. 
Hymen, hi'men. 
hymeneal, himSne'al. 
Hymettus, himet'us. 
hymnal, him'nal. 
hymned, himd. 
hymning, him'mg, him'- 

nmg. 
hymnology, himn6l'8dzi. 
hypallage, hiparildzS, hip- 

al'adze. 
Hypatia, hipa'shSfa. 
hyperaemia, hip^re'mia. 
hypersesthesia, hiperesthe'- 

sia, hip^resthe'zia. 
hyperbola, hiper'bSla. 
hyperbole, hiper'bole. 



ohr, iu=u in use, <irn, iip, circus, menii, food, fd6t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
feat, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich^ n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20, 



126 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Hyperborean, hiperbo'rSan. 
Hyperion, hipe'riSn, hiper'- 

r6n. 
hypertrophy, hiper'trSff. 
hypochondria, hipOkon'- 

dria, hip8k6n'dria. 
hypochondriac, hip6k5n'- 

driak, hipok5n'driak. 
hypochondriacal, hipSkon- 

dri'akal. 
hypochondriasis, hip6k5n- 

dri'asis. 
hypocrisy, hip5k'risi. 
hypocrite, hip'Skrit. 
hypodermic, hipodSr'mik. 
hypogastric, hipOgas'trik. 
hypophosphate, hip6fos'- 

fat, hip8f5s'fat. 



hypotenuse, hip6t'Snius. 
hypothecate, hipSth'Skat, 

hipoth'Skat. 
hypothenuse, hip6th'enius. 
The spelling and pronuncia- 
tion, though historically errone- 
ous, seems to be the prevalent 
one. 

hypothesis, hipSth'gsis, hi- 

p5th'Ssis. 
hypothetic, hip6thet'ik, hi- 

pothetlk. 
hypothetical, hip8thet'ikal, 

hipothet'ikal. 
Hyrcan, htlr'kan. 
hyson, hi's'n. 
hyssop, his'up. 
hysteria, histe'ria. 



ale, senSte, c&re, St, accord, arm, ask, sofa, lovable, eve, event, Snd, recent, 
thgre. ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



I 



lacchus, iSk'&s. 

lachimo, ya'kfemo, lakTmo. 

lago, 6&'go. 

lamblichus, i^m'blikus, 

dzam'blikus. 
Ian, e'^n. 
ibid., ib'id. 

So pronounced as an abbrevia- 
tion of the Latin ibidem {IWd^m), 

ibis, i'bis. 

Ibrahim Pasha, ibrahem' 

pasha'. 
Ibsen, ib'sen, ip'sen. 
Icarian, ika'rian. 
Icarus, ik'arfis. 
Ichabod, ik'ab6d. 
Ich Dien, iCH den', 
ichneumon, ikniu'm8n. 
ichor, i'kOr, i'k5r. 
ichthyology, ikthiol'odzi. 
ichthyosaurus, ikthi6s6'- 

rus. 
ici on parle frangais, ese' 

on pari franse'. 
icon, i'kon. 
iconoclast, ikSn'SklSst. 



Ictinus, Ikti'niis. 

ide'a. 

ide'al. 

idealization, idSSlIza'shGn. 

Ides, idz. 

idiosyncrasy, idiSsin'krasi. 

Idomeneus, id5m'Snius. 

Idumaea, idiume'3,. 

idyl, i'dil. 

idylist, i'dilist. 

So pronounced, also, when 
spelled idyllist. 

idyllic, Idirik. 

lena, ea'na. 

ieroe (Scot.), e^ro'. 

If, Chateau d', shato' def. 

Ignatiev, ign&'ty^f. 

Ignatius, igna'shius. 

ignes fatui, ignez f^t'iui. 

ignis fatuus, ig'nis fatiuus. 

ignition, ignish'fln. 

ignominy, ig'n6mini. 

ignoramus, ign6ra'mus. 

iguana, igwa'na. 

Ik Marvel, ik mar'vSl. 

He de France, el' de frans'. 



bhr, iu=u in use, iirn, up, circus, menii, food, fd6t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
y»at, a?ure, CH = Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



128 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Ilfracombe, ilfrakoom'. 
ill-fa'ard (Scot.), el-ford'. 

So pronounced, also, when 
spelled ill-far^ d or ill-faured. It 
even appears as ill-faurH {W- 
fort). 

illicit, ilis'it. 
lUinoian, ilinoi'an. 
Illinois, ilinoi'. 

lUncdz^ is also allowed, but it 
is seldom heard. 

lUinoisian, ilinoi'yan, ili- 

moiz'ian. 
lUuminati, iliumina'ti, iliu- 

min&'te. 
illusive, iliu'siv. 
illustrate, ilus'trat, il'iis- 

trat. 
illustrated, ilu'strated, il'- 

fistrated. 
illustration, il^stra'shfin. 
illustrative, flu'strativ, il'- 

ustrStiv. 
illustrator, ilu'strS^ter. 
Iloilo, el6e'lo. 
II Penseroso, el pensero'so. 
II Pensiero, el pSnsea'ro. 
Ilus, i'lGs. 
imagery, im'Sdzri. 
imbecile, im'bSsil. 
imbroglio, imbrol'yo. 
immersion, imur'shun. 

ale, senSte, cftre, at, accord, &rm, 3sk, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



immobile, imo'bfl. 
immune, imiun'. 
immunization, imiuniza'- 

shun, imiuniza'shun. 
Imogen, im'6dz6n. 
impasse, anpS^s'; (Ang.), 

impas'. 
impedimenta, impSdimen'- 

ta. 

implacable, impla'kS,b'l. 
importune, imp5rtiun', im- 

por'tiun. 
impotence, im'p6t§ns. 
impotency, im'p6tensl. 
impotent, im'p8tent. 
imprecatory, Im'prSkatSri. 
impresario, imprSsa'rSo. 
impress (verb), impres'; 

(subst.), im'pres. 
imprimatur, imprima'ttir. 
improvisation, imprSviza'- 

shfin. 
improvisator, impr5v'iza- 

ter. 
improvisatore, imprSvez^,- 

to'ra. 
improvisatrice, imprSveza- 

tree'cha. 
improvise, imprSviz'. 
improviser, impr&vi'zer. 
impugn, impiun'. 

sofa, lovable, eve, ivent, JJnd, recent, 
cofifee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



129 



incomparable, ink6m'p&r- 

ab^l. 
inconclusive, inkonkloos'iv. 
incondite, ](nk6n'dit. 
incongruity, inkongroo'itL 
inconnu i(Fr.), ank6nu; 

(Ang.), mkoniu'. 
inconvenience, inkSnven'- 

yens. 
inconvenient, InkSnven'- 

yent. 
incorporal, ](nk6r'p6ral. 
Cf. incorporeal. 

incorporeal, ink6rp5'rSal. 
increase (verb), inkres'; 

(subst.),. in'kres. 
increate, in'krgat.' 
increment, Xn'krSment. 
incroyable, ankrwaya'b'l. 
inculcate, inkul'kat, in'kul- 

kat. 
British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

inculpate, in'kulpat, inkul'- 

pat. 
indecorous, mdSko'r&s, in- 

dek'6ras. 
indecorum, indsko'rum- 
indent, indent', 
indicative, mdik'ativ. 
indicatory, in'dikS,t6ri. 

bhr, iu = u in use, turn, up, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, a^?gle, payt, thin, 
tfeat, a^ure, CH = Germ, ich, A (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



^ impugnable, impug'nSb'I. 
impunible, impiu'nib'l. 
inamorata, mamOra'ta. 
in articulo mortis, in Srtik'- 

iulo mSr'tis. 
inaugurate, ino'giurat. 
Inca, in'ka. 
incarnadine, inkar'nadin, 

inkar'nadln. 
incense (verb), insens'; 

(subst.), in'sens. 
inchoate, !n'k6S,t. 
inchoative, inko'ativ. 
incidence, in'sidens. 
incise, insiz'. 
incisive, insi'siv. 
incisor, insi'zer. 
incitant, msit'ant, in'sitant. 
British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

incline, inklin'. 
include, inklood'. 
inclusive, inkloo'siv. 
incognito, inkSg'nito. 
incognizable, 'mk5g'nizab4. 
incognizant, ink6g'nizant. 
incommensurable, in'ko- 

men'shdorab^l. 
incommensurate, inko- 

men'shoorat. 



130 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



indicatrix, indika'triks. 
/Indices, in'disez. 
y)< indict, indit'. 
y indictable, indifab^. 
^indictive, mdi'ktiv. 
V indictment, mdit'ment. 
^ indigenous, indidz'Snus. 
yT indigent, in'didzent. 
y indisputable, indis'piutab'l. 
V indisputably, indis'piutabli. 
T^ indissoluble, indis'81iub'l, 
indis5riub'l. 
indissolubly, IndiLs'61iubli, 
indisSriubli. 
K indite, indit'. 
indocile, ind5s'fl. 
inebriate, me'briat. 
inebriety, inSbri'gtL 
inertia, iner'shia. 

Ines, e'nes, i'ngs. 

See also Inez, 
in es'sfe. 

inexhaustible, inggzosfib'l. 
inexorable, ineks'6rab'l. 
inexpiable, ineks'piab'l. 
>* inexplicable, ineks'plikab'l. 
inexpugnable, inekspug'- 
nab'l, inekspiun'ab'l. 

The second is allowed in 
American, but not in British, 
usage. 

in extremis, in ekstre'mis. 

ale, senSte, cSre, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov^r, Edtn, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



inextricable, ineks'trikab'l. 
Inez, i'nez. 
Cf . Ines. 

infamous, in'famus. 
infamously, in'famflsli. 
Infanta, infan'tS,. 
Infante, infan'ta. 
infanticide, infan'tisid. 
infantile, in'fantil, in'fantil. 
infantine, in'fantin, in'fan- 

tin. 
infecund, infek'und, infe'- 

kund. 
inferable, inf^r'Sb^, in'fer- 

inference, in'ferens. 
Inferno, Inf^r'no. 
infinite, in'finit. 
infinitesimal, infinites'imal. 
infinitival, infinitiVal. 
inflatus, infla't&s. 
infundibuliform, infundi'- 

biuliform. 
infundibulum, infundib'- 

iulum. 
infusoria, infiuso'ria. 
Ingelow, Jean, dzen in'- 

dz^lo. 
ingenious, indzen'yfis. 
ingenue, anzhanti'. 
ingenuity, indzSniu'iti. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, rec?nt, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.i 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



131 



ingenuous, indzen'iuus. 

ingine (Scot.), en'dzin. 

ingle, in'g'l. 

ingot, in'got, in'got. 

ingrain, in'gran, ingran'. 

"Now usually stressed in'- 
grain before a substantive, in- 
grain' after it or in the predi- 
cate."— Oxford Dictionary. 

ingrate, Jn'grat. 
ingredient, ingre'dient. 
Ingres, an'gr'. 
in hoc signo vinces. In h6k 

sig'nS vin'sez. 
inhospitable, inh6s'pit&b'l. 
inhospitably, 3[nh6s'pitS,blL 
Inkerman, ink'^rman'. 
inlay (subst.), in'la; (verb), 

Inla'. 
in loco parentis, in lo'kS 

parSn'tis. 
in medias res, in me'diSs 

rez. 
in mem5'riam, 
innate, in'nat, innat'. 
innocuous, in6k'iuus. 
innoxious, in5k'shus, in- 

nSk'shus. 
Innsbruck, ins'brook. 
innuendo, iniuSn'do. 
inopportune, in5p6rtiun'. 



in-ower (Scot.), ino'^r, in- 

ou'er. 
in posse, in p6s'S. 
in propria persona, in pro'- 

pria perso'nS,. 
in puris naturalibus, in 

piu'ris natiuraribus. 
inquiry, inkwi'ri. 
in re. 
in saecula sseculorum, in 

sek'iula, sSkiulo'rum. 
insatiety, insS-ti'eti. 
inscience, in'shiens, in'- 

shens. 
inscrutable, inskroo'tab'l. 
insert (subst.), in'sert; 

(verb), insert', 
insight (Scot., household 

goods) , in'sit, in'siCHt. 
in situ, in si'tiu. 
insolate, in's61at. 
insolation, insOla'shun. 
insoluble, insSriub'l. 
insouciance, Msoosy ans' ; 

(Ang.), insoo'sians. 
The French pronunciation is 
preferable. 

insouciant, insoo'siant ; 

(Fr.), tosoosyah'. 
Both British and American 
usage favor the Anglicized form. 

inspiration, inspira'shun. 



bhr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, food, fd6t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
^4^at, a^urOj CQ = Gernj, i^hy t (Fr.) 7?k?w, See pqmple^e i^ey, pages 15-20, 



132 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



t 



^ instanter, instan'ter. 

"yC in statu quo, in sta'tiu 

kwo. 
^^ instinct (subst.), in'stinkt; 

(adj.), mstinkt'. 
\ institute, in'stitiut. 
institution, institiu'shun. 
insular, in'siular. 
insulate, in'siulat. 
insult (subst.), in'sult; 

^(verb), insult'. 
intaglio, int5,l'yo. 
integer, in'tSdz^r. 
integral, in'tSgrS,!. 
intercalary, Int^r'kSIM. 
intercalation, interkS;la'- 

shfln. 
interdict (subst.), In't^r- 

dikt; (verb), Inter- 

dikt'. 
interest, Jta'tSrgst. 
interested, in'terSstSd. 
interesting, in'terestin. 
interfluent, intfer'AooSnt. 
interfluous, int^r'floofis. 
Interlaken, interlS^'kSn. 
interlocutor, int6rl6k'iut6r. 
interlocutory, Int^plSk'- 

iutSri. 
interloper, in't6rl5pgr. 
intermezzo, int^rmSd'zo. 

ale, senate, o&re, at, aocord, irm, Ssk, 
thSre, oY&r, Eden* ice, ill, old, obey, drb 



internecine, interne'sin, in- 

terne'sin. 
interpellate, mt^rpSl'at. 
interpellation, int^rpela'- 

sh&n. 
interpolate, int6r'p61at. 
interpolation, intei'p61a'- 

shtin. 
interstice, inter'stfe. 
interstitial, Int^rstish'SI. 
intestine, Intfis'tin. 
intrepidity, intrfepid'M. 
in'trig&it. 

The feminine form is iniri- 
gantej stressed lntrigdnt\ Both 
forms are pronounced as here in- 
dicated when spelled with a u 
{intriguant). The French sound 
is, masc, dntregan; fern., dn- 
tregdnt. 

intrigue, intrSg'. 

The best usage is in favor of 
the same sound for both substan- 
tive and verb. 

introit, intro'it. 
intrusive, introo'siv. 
inundate, in'tlndat, intln'- 

dat. 
inure, iniur'. 
invalid (subst.), Jtn'v&Iid; 

(adj.), invai'id. 
invalide (Fr.), Snvaled'. 
inveigh, inva'. 

sofS, lov&ble, eve, ivent, iSnd, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemdn, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



183 



inveigle, inve'gl. 
inventory, In'ventSrf. 
Inverness, invernSs'. 
inverse, invtirs', in'vtirs. 
in vino Veritas, in vi'no 

vgr'Itas. 
invitatory, !nvi'tSt6rf. 
invocatory, inv5k'^t6rJ. 
involucral, JnvSliu'krdl. 
i'6. 

iodide, i'Sdid, i'8d!d. 
iodine, i'Sdin, i'fidin. 
iodoform, io'dSforni; i5d'- 

6f6rm. 
lolanthe, i81Sn'th§. 
i'on. 
lo'na. 
io'nS. 
ionic, iSn'ik. 

So pronounced in either sense, 
as pertaining to ionSj or pertaining 
to Ionia, 

io'ta. 

i'6wa. 

i'6wan. 

ipecac, Ip'fekak. 

ipecacuanha, ipSkSkiuSn'S.. 

Iphigenia, ifldzSni'S. 

ipso facto, ip'so fak'to. 

Iquique, Ske'ka. 

Iran, eran'; (Ang.), Iran'. 

ohr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, a^gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) man. See complete key, pagea 15-20. 



irascibility, irSsibirit!, frfis- 

ibiriti. 
irascible, irSs'ib^I, irSs'iba. 
irate, irat', i'rat. 
Irawadi, frS,w6d'i. 
Irenaeus, irSne'us. 
Irene, iren'. 

As a Greek name it is Ire'nit; 
the French form, Irenes is pro- 
nounced er^n'. 

iridium, irid'ium. 
iritis, iri'tis. 
Irkutsk, irkootsk'. 
Iroquois, !r6kwoi'. 
irrecognizable, irek'ogniz- 

ab^l. 
irreconcilable, irekonsil'- 

aba. 
irrefragable, iref'ragabl. 
irrefutable, irefiut'lib'l. 
irremeable, irem'Sab'l. 
irremediable, irSme'dlab'l. 
irreparable, irep'arab'l. 
irresoluble, irez'oliub'L 
irrevocable, irev'Skab'L 
Isaiah, iza'ya, izi'a. 
Ischia, es'keS. 
Iser, e'z^r; (Ang.), i'ser. 
Iseult, Ssoolt'. 
i'shSm. 
Ishmael, feh'mSel. 



134 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Ishmaelite, ish'maelit. 

Isiac, i'siak. 

Isi'acal. 

isinglass, i'zinglas. 

Isla de Pinos, es'la da 

pe'nos. 
Islam, is'lam,iz'lam, islam'. 
Islamic, islam'ik, izlam'ik. 
Islamite, is'lamit, iz'lamit. 
Islas Filipinas, es'las 

felepe'nas. 
Islay, i'la, is'la. 
islet, i'let. 
Is'lip. 

Ismailia, esmael'ya. 
Ismail Pasha, ismael' pfi,- 

shS,', ismael' pash'3;. 
isochronal, is6k'r6ndl. 
isochronism, is6k'r6niz'm. 
isochronous, is5k'r6nus. 
Isocrates, is5k'rS.tez. 
isolable, is'61S,bl, is'ol&bl. 
isolate, is'61at, is'81at. 
isolation, is61a'shun, is61a'- 

shun. 
Isolde, isold'. 
Isonzo, Szon'tso. 
isosceles, isSs'elez. 
isotherm, i'sOth^rm. 
Ispahan, Ispahan'. 
Israel, iz'rSel. 

ale, senate, c&re, St aocord, Srm, Ssk, 
there, ov€r, Eden, ice, ill, did, obey 6rb, 



Israelite, iz'rEelit. 

Israels, Josef, yo'zSf esra- 

els'. 
Israfel, iz'rafel. 

When written Israfil or Israfeel 
it is pronounced ez'rafel. 

Issachar, is'akar. ♦ 
Istambul, estambool'. 
isthmian, is'mian, isth'- 

mian, ist'mian. 
isthmus, Js'mus, isth'mus, 

ist'miis. 
Italian, it3,ryan. 
italic, it^l'ik. 

italicization, italisiza'shun. 
italicize, ital'Mz. 
it 'aid (prefix), 
iteration, itera'shun. 
iterative, it'^r§,tiv. 
Ithamar, ith'amar. 
Ithuriel, ithiu'riel. 
itinerant, itin'erant. 
itinerary, itin'erari. 
itis, i'tis. 
Ito, e'to. 
Iturbide, de, da etoorbe'- 

tha; (in Mexico), 

etoorbe'da. 
Iturea, itiure'S. 
Itys, i'tis. 
lulus, iiu'ltts. 

8o^, lovable, eve, ivent, ^nd, recSnt, 
cSfifee, odd, c5nnect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Ivan, evan', i'van. 
Ivangorod, Svan'g6r6t. 
Ivanhoe, i'vanho. 
Ivry, evre'. 
Ixion, iksi'on. 



135 

eshtfflsho'- 



Ixtlilxochitl, 

Izdubar, izdoobar'. 
Iztaccihuatl, e s 1 3. k s e ' - 



ohr, !u=u in use, Am, up, circus, menfl, food, fd6t, out, oil, aijgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 16-20. 
10 



J 



Jachimo, ya'kemo. 
jacinth, dza'sinth, dz3,s'- 

inth. 
jackal, dzak'ol. 
Jacobean, dzak8b§'5,n. 
Jacobi, yako'bS. 
Jacobin, dzak'6Mn. 
Jacobite, dzSk'fibit. 
Jacoby, yako'bS. 
Jacopo, ya'kopo. 
Jacquard, zakar'. 
Jacquerie, zakre'. 

Jacques, zak. 

See also Jaques. 
Jacques Bonhomme, z5,k 

b5n5m'. 
jad (Scot.), dzad, dzad. 
Jael, dza'^I. 
jaguar, dzag'war, zagwar'. 

The Oxford Dictionary gives 
second place to d^g'iuaT' 

Jaime, Don, don hae'ma. 

Jaipur, dzi'poor. 

Jairus, dza'irfts, dz&i'rfls. 

jalap, dzal'ap. 

jalousie, zalooze'. 

ale, senate, c4re, lit, accord, Srm, Ssk, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, 111, 5ld, 6bey, 6rb 



Jamblichus, dzam'blikus. 
Jamshid, dzS^mshed'. 
Janauschek, ya'noushek. 
Janet (Paul), zanS. 
Janiculum, dzanik'iulum. 
Janin, Jules, zlil zanan'. 
janizary, dzan'izSri. 
Jansen, dzan'sen. 
Jansenist, dzan'senist. 
Janvier, zanvya'. 
Japheth, dza'feth. 
Jaques, daz'kwez, dzSk'wSs, 
zhak. 
The first two are the common 
sounds of the name as Anglicized 
in English literature, especially 
Shakespeare. Cf . Jacques. 

Jardin des Plantes, zardSn' 

da plant', 
jardiniere, zardenyar. 
Jamdyce, dzarn'dis. 
Jaroslav, yaroslav'. 
jaunt, dz5,nt, dzont. 
jaunty, dzan'ti, dzon'ti. 
Jaures, Jean, zan zores'. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
c5ffe«, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



137 



javelin, dzav'lin, dzav'eUn. 
British usage prefers the sec- 
ond; as did Wordsworth: 

*' Proud Gorden, maddened by the 
thoughts 
That through his brain are travel- 
ling, 
Rushed forth, and at the heart of 
Bruce 
He launched the deadly javelin!" 

Javert, zavdr'. 

jean (cotton cloth), dzen. 

The dictionaries still offer us 
dfdUj but it is obsolete in prac- 
tice. 

Jean, dzen; (Fr.), zM. 

Jeanne, z5,n. 

Jeanne d'Arc, zan d3,rk'. 

Jean Valjean, zan' valzS^n'. 

Jehoshaphat, dzShSsh'Sfat. 

Jehu, dze'hiu. 

jeisticor (Scot.), jes'tikSr, 

jes'tikSr. 
jejune, dzSdzoon'. 
Jekyll (Dr.), dze'kil. 
Jemappes, zemap'. 
Jena, ya'nS.. 
je ne sais quoi, zh6 n6 sa 

kw&'. 
jeopard, dzep'ard. 
jeopardize, dzep'lLrdiz. 
jeopardy, dzep'lLrd!. 
Jephthah, dzef'thS. 
jerboa, dzerbo'lL. 
jeremiad, dzerSmi'Sd. 

ohr, iu=u in use, <irn, iip, circiis, menQ, food, f66t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
tbat, ayure, CH = Germ. ich, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



Jerome, dz^rom', dzer'om. 
jessamine, dzes'amin. 
Jesu, je'siu. 
Jesuit, jez'iuit. 
jeu d'esprit, zodgspre'. 
jexmesse doree, zones dSra'. 
Jeypoor, dzi'poor. 
Jezreel, dzez'rgel, dzezrel'. 
jinrikisha, dzinrik'isha. 

Also jinricksha (d^lnr^k^shd) 
and colloquially rickshaw. 

jiujitsu, dzoo' jitsoo. 

Less commonly jiujutsu {dzoo- 
dzoot'soo), 

Joachim, dzo'akim, yo'- 

aCHim. 
Joaquin, w&ken'. 
Jocasta, dzSkas'ta. 
jocimd, dz5k'und. 
Joffre, z8'fr'. 
Johann, yo'han, y8hSn'. 
Johannes, dzShan'ez. 
Johannesberg, y6h3,n'gs- 

burg. 
Joinville, de, de zwanvel'. 
Jordaens, yor'dans. 
Jorullo, hSrool'yo. 
Jose, hSsa' 

This is the Spanish soimd of 
the name; in Portuguese it is 
pronounced ?ozo'. 

Joseffy, y8zgf'i[. 



138 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Joubert (Dutch), you'bert. 
Joubert (Er.), zoobdr'. 
Jouffroy, zoofrwa'. 
jougs (Scot.), dzoogz. 
jouk (Scot.), dzook. 
Jourdain, zoordah'. 
Jourdan, zoordM'. 
Journal des Debats, zoor- 

nal' da dab&'. 
joust, dzust, dzoost. 
jow (Scot.), dzou, dzo. 
Jowett, dzou'et. 
jowl, dzol, dzoul. 
Juan, hwan. 

This is the Spanish sound; 
in JByron it is Anglicized, d6n 
d^oo'dn. 

Juan Fernandez, hwan 
f grnin'dath ; (Ang.) , 
dzoo'an fernan'dSz. 

Juanita, hwane'tS,. 

Juarez, hwa'ras. 

jubilate, jiubila'tS, yoobS- 

la'ta. 
So sounded as the common or 
proper noun; the verb, more com- 
pletely Anglicized, is d^iuh'Uat, 

Juch (Emma), yooCH. 

judicatory, dzoo'dikS-tSri. 

judicature, dzoo'dikS^tiur. 

judiciary, dzoodish'iSri. 

Juggernaut, dzug'^rnot. 

jugular, dzdo'giulSr. 

ale, senSte, cAre, St, accord, Srm, §sk, 
tbfre, ov0r, E4^ii, ;ce, Jll, qW, $t>ey, Orl? 



Jugurtha, dzoogtir'thS. 
Juif Errant, le, le ziuef6r5,n. 

jujitsu, dzoo'dzitsoo. 

See also jiujitsu. 
Jules, ziil. 
Julie, ziile'. 
Julien, ztily^n'. 
Julienne, ztilyen'. 
Juliet, dziu'Uet. 
Jungfrau, yoon'frou. 
Juniata, dzoomSt'a. 
Junot, zun6'. 

junta, dzun't^. 

In Spanish, hdbn'td, 
junto, dzun'to. 
jupon, dzoo'pSn, dzoopSn'; 

(Fr.), zupon'. 
jurisconsult, dzoorisk5n'- 

sult. 
juror, dzoo'r^r. 
jus (law), dzus. 
Jusserand, ziis'rM'. 

just (tilt), dzust. 

Cf. joust, 
juste-milieu, ziist melyo'. 
justiciable, dziistish'iib'l. 
justifiable, dzus'tifiab'I. 
justificative, dziis'tifikStiv. 
justificatory,dzus'tifikS,t6ri, 

dzustif'ikitSri. 
juvenile, dzoo'vSnil, dzoo'- 

vSnil. 

sofS, lov6ble, eve, event, iSnd, recent, 
, cOlfeCf Qd4? coi^Rect, iem^n, 9 (Gerw.) 



K 



kabala, kSb'&la. 
Kabul, ki'bool, k^bool'. 
Kipling prefers the first: 

"Kabul town's by Kabul river — 

Blow the bugle, draw the sword — '* 

kadi, ka'di, ka'di. 
Kafir, kaf'er. 
Kalakaua, k3,15;kou'3,. 
kaleidoscope, kali'd6skop. 
Kalends, k^^l'endz. 
Kalevala, ka'lavali. 
Kalisz, kal'ySsh. 
Kamchatka, kamchat'ka. 
See also Kamtschatka. 

Kamehameha, kama'ha- 

ma'ha. 
Kamerun, kamS,roon'. 
Kamtschatka, kamchat'ka, 

kamchat'ka. 
So pronounced, also, when 
spelled Kamtchatka or Kamchat- 
ka. 

Kanaka, kSn'akS. 

''In Australia improperly 
kdndk'd," — Oxford Dictionary. 

Kanawha, kano'wa. 

Kansas, kan'zas. 

Kant, kant; (Ang.), kSnt. 

bhr, iu = u in use, Am, up, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, aijgle, paj*t, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



Kantian, kSn'tian. 
ka'61in, ka'Slin. 
Kapel'meister, k 5; p e 1 ' - 

mister. 
Karat. 
See carat. 

Karlsruhe, Karls'rooe. 
Kavanagh, k^v'lLna. 

Jones gives kdv'dnd or kdv^dnd. 
Many families in the United 
States call it kdv'dnd, 

Kazan, kaz5,n'y'. 
Kearney, kar'ni. 
Keble, ke'bU. 
keelivine (Scot.), kel'ivm. 
keelson, kel'son. 
Kehama, kSha'ma. 
Keighley, keth'li. 

This is its sound as a place 
name; as a surname it is pro- 
nounced ke'll, kVU, 

Kelt, kelt. 
Cf. Celt. 

Keltic, kel'tiik. 
Cf . Celtic. 

Kempis, a (Thomas), & 
kem'pis. 



140 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Kennebec, kgnSbek'. 

There is authority for stress- 
ing this either on the first syl- 
lable or the last. Probably the 
two stresses are nearly even, 
varying with sentence modula- 
tion. 

Kennebunk, kenebunk'. 
Keokuk, ke'6kuk. 
kepi, kep'S. 
keramic, keram'ik. 
Kerenski, ker'enske. 
Kerguelen,ktir'gelen; (Fr.), 

kergalon'. 
Keswick, kez'ik. 
ketchup, kech'up. 

The form and sound of the 
word vary according to its sup- 
posed origins; but this form is 
now widely accepted. 

khaki, ka'ks. 

khan, kan, kan. 

Khartum, k^rtoom'. 

khedive, kedev'. 

Khiva, ke'va. 

Khorassan, CHorassan'. 

Khorsabad, CHorsabad'. 

Kiaochow, kyou'cho'. 

So pronounced, also, when 
spelled Kiavrchiau. 

kiaugh (Scot.), kyaCH. 

Kieff, ke'yef. 

Cf. Kiev. 

Kiel, kel. 



Kiev, ke'ygf. 
Cf. Kieff. 

Kilauea, keloua'S. 
kiln, kil, kiln, 
kilogram, kil'ogram. 
kiloliter, kil'Sleter. 
kilometer, kil'Smeter. 
kilowatt, kil'&wot. 
Kincardine, kink ar 'din, 

kinkar'din. 
kinematic, kinSmat'ik. 
kinematograph, kinSmat'- 

Sgraf, kinSmat'ograf. 
kinetic, kinet'ik, kinet'ik. 
kinetoscope, kine'tSskop. 
kinrick (Scot.), ken'rik. 
kippage (Scot.), kep'Edz. 
kiosk, keosk'. 
Kioto, kyo'to. 
Kirchhoff, kerCH'h6f. 
Kirk Kilise (Kilisseh), kerk 

kilis'e, kerk kSlesa'. 
Kishinev, kishinef , kSshS- 

ny6f'. 
kismet, kis'met. 
Kissingen, kis'ingen; 

(Ang.), kis'endzen. 
kitling (Scot.), ket'iin. 
kiutle (Scot.), kiit"!. 
Klamath, kl^m'ath. 
Klaus, klous. 

ale, sen&tt, c&re, at, accord, arm, ask, sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
there, ov^r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



141 



Kleber, klabar'. 
Klopstock, klOp'shtSk. 
knibblach (Scot.), k'nib'- 

laCH. 
knoll, nol. 
Knollys, nolz. 
knout, nout, noot. 
knowe (Scot.), k'nou, nou. 
Koch, koCH. 
Koenigsberg, ko'niCHs- 

berCH. 
Koemer, kor'ner. 
Kohinoor, ko'hinoor. 
Kohler, koFer. 
Koniggratz, ko'mCHgrets'. 
Konigsberg, kon'iCHs- 

berCH. 
Also spelled Koeigsherg. 

kopje, k5p'i. 
Koran, kSran', ko'ran. 
Kosciusko, kSsius'ko. 
Kosciuszko, koshchyoosh'- 

ko. 
kosher, ko'sher. 
Kossuth, k5sh'6ot, k6- 

sooth'. 



Kotzebue, von, fSn kSt'- 

seboo. 
Kouyunjik, koo'undzik. 
kraal, kral. 
Krag-Jorgensen, kr5.g' yor'- 

gensen. 
Krakow, kra'koof. 
Krapot'km. 
Kremlin, krgm'lin. 
kreutzer, kroit's^r. 
Kronstadt, kron'shtat. 
Kropotkin, krapot'ken. 
Krupp, kroop. 
Kubelik, koo'belik. 
Kublai Khan, koo'bli kS^n'. 
Kulturkampf, kooltoor'- 

k&mpf. 
Kurdistan, kocrdistan'. 
Kurfiirst, koor'fiirst. 
Kurland, koorland. 
Kut - el - Amara, koot' - el - 

ama'rS,. 
Kyoto, kyo'to. 
Kyrie eleison, kir'ie §li's6n, 

ke'ria ela'is5n. 



ohr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, a^gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, ii (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



laager, IS'ger. 
La Bassee. 

See Bassee, La. 
la belle dame sans merci, 

la bel dam san merse'. 
Labienus, labie'nus. 
labor omnia vincit, la'bor 

6m'nia vin'sit. 
Labouchere, labooshar'. 
Laboulaye, laboole'. 
La Bruyere, la brtiydr'. 
Laccadive, lak'adiv. 
Lacedsemon, lasSde'm6n. 
Lachesis, lak'Ssis. 
Lachine, lashen'. 
lachrymal, lak'rimal. 
lachrymose, lak'rimos. 
laconic, lak5n'ik. 
lactein, lak'tgin. 
lacuna, lakiu'na. 
lacustrine, IS-kus'trln. 
Ladislas, lad'islas. 
Ladrones, ladronz'; (Sp.), 

lidro'nas. 
Laertes, Iser'tez. 
Lafayette, de, d6 lM&y^t\ 
Lafitte, lafet'. 



La Follette, E f5I'6t. 

Lagado, laga'do, lag'ado. ; 

La Gloire, la glwar'. 

Lagos, la'gos, la'gos. 

La Guayra, la gwae'ra. 

Lahore, labor'. 

laigh (Scot.), laCH. 

Laing, lang. 

La'is. 

laissez faire, le'sa far'. 

Lajeunesse, Gabriel, gat 

rigl' lazones'. 
Lalla Rookh, la'la rook'. 
L'AUegro, lalla'gro. 
Lamartine, de, de lamar 

ten'. 
Lambert, lam'bert; (Fr.), 

lanber'. 
lambrequin, ISm'brSkin. 
Lamech, la'mek. 
lamentable, lam'entab'l. 
Lameth, de, delame'. 
Lamia, la'mia. 
La Motte-Fouque, la m6t'- 

fooka'. 
Lanark, lan'ark. 
Lancaster, lan'kHst^r. 



ale, senate, c^re, St, accord, Srm, Ssk, sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



143 



Lancelot du Lac, lan'sS16t 

du lak. 
Lanceolate, lan'sSftlSt. 
Lanciani, l^nch^-'ne. 
lanciers, lan'serz. 
landau, l^n'do, lan'dou. 
Landgraf, iSnt'graf. 
Landgrave, land'grav. 
Landgravine, land'grSven. 
Landsturm, lant'stoorm, 

IS^nt'shtoorm. 
Landwehr, lant'var. , 
Lanfrey, lanfre'. 
Lange, lan'e. 
lang syne, ISn sin'. 
Languedoc, land6k'. 
langue d'oil, Ian dSel'. 
languet, 13,n'gwet. 
languid, ISn'gwid. 
languish, lan'gwish. 
languor, l^n'ger, lan'gwer. 
languorous, lan'ger&s, lan'- 

gw^rus. 
Lanier, laner'. 
Lannes, Ian. 
lansquenet, lans'kanet. 
Laocoon, laok'66n. 
Laodamia, ISSdami'a. 
Laodicea, lS,6dise'a. 
Laodicean, la5dise'an. 
Laom'gdon. 



La'os. 

La Patrie, la patre'. 

La Perouse, la parooz'. 

Lapham, lap'am. 

la'pis, lap'is. 

lapis lazuli, la'pis laz'iuli, 

lap'is laz'iuli. 
Lapithse, lap'ithe. 
Laplace, laplas'. 
Laputa, l^piu'ta. 
Lara, la'ra. 
Lares, la'rez. 
largess, l&r'dzes. 

So pronounced, also, when 
spelled largesse. 

larghetto, larggt'tS. 
larghissimo, large'sim8. 
lariat, lar'iat. 
La Rochefoucauld, de, dS 

larSshfooko'. 
La Rochelle, la roshel'. 
laryngitis, larindzi'tis. 
lasso, las'o. 
Latakia, latake'a. 
Lateran, lat'eran. 
lath, lath, 
lathe, lath, 
laths, lathz. 
Latinus, lati'nfls. 
Latium, la'shium. 



ohr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, ai?gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



144 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Latour d'Auvergne, de, de 

latoor' dovern'y'. 
latrine, latren'. 
lauch (Scot.), laCH. 
Laughlin, laf'lin. 
launch, lanch, lonch. 
launder, lan'der, lon'der. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

laundress, l&n'dres, lon'- 

dres. 
laundry, lan'dri, 16n'dri. 
Launfal (Sir), lan'fal, lon'- 

fal. 
laureate, 16'reat. 
laurel, lo'rSl, 15r'el. 
Laurier (Sir Wilfrid), lo'- 

ria. 
Lausanne, lozan'. 
laverock (Scot.), lav'erok,. 

lav'rok. 
Lavoisier, lavwazya'. 
Layamon, la'amon. 
lazar, la'zar. 
lazzarone, lazaro'na; (It.), 

ladzaro'na. 
Leander, ISan'der. 
leant, lent. 
leaped, lept. 
leapt, lept. 

ale, senate, c^re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ovSr, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



learned, lernd, ler'ned. 

The first is the past tense of 
the verb; the second, the past 
participle or adjective. 

Le Bceuf, le hM\ 
Lebrun, 16 brun'. 
leb 'wohl, lap vol', 
leeward, lu'erd, lewerd. 

The second is hardly more 
than a dictionary word, but the 
dictionaries traditionally prefer 
it to the one actually in use. 

Lefebvre, lefev'r'. 
Lefevre, IfefeV^r. 
Legare, legre'. 
legate, leg'at. 

legend, ISdz'end, le'dzend. 
legendary, ledz'endari. 
Legendre, lezan'dr'. 
legerdemain, ledzerdSman'. 
legged, legd, leg'ed. 
leghorn, ISg'horn, leg'orn. 
legume, leg'ium, ISgium'. 
Leibnitz, lip'nits. 
Leicester, les'ter. 
Leigh, Aurora, oro'ra le'. 
Leighton, la'ton. 
Leilah, la'E'. 
Leinster, ISn'ster. 
Leipsic, lip'sik. 
Leipzig, lip'tsiCH. 
leister (Scot.), les'ter, Igs'- 
ter. 

sofa, lovable, eve, §vent, end, recent, 
I, coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



145 



leisure, leziur, lez'iur. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

Leith, leth. 

Lely (Sir Peter), le'li. 

leman, ISm'an, le'man. 

Leman (Lake), le'man. 

Lremberg, lem'berCH. 

lemur, le'mur. 

Len'ape. 

L'Enclos, Ninon de, nenon' 

d^ lankl8\ 
Lenine, leaen'. 
Lens, lans. 
renvoi, lenvoi'; (Fr.), lan'- 

vwa'. 
Leominster (Eng.), lem'ste, 

Iem'inste;(U.S.),lem'- 

inster. 
Leonardo da Vinci, la8n&r'- 

do da ven'che. 
Le5na't6. 
X Leoncavallo, laSnkavario. 
Leonidas, l§5n'idas. 
Leopardi, laOpar'de. 
Lepanto, lap&n'to. 
le roi est mort, vive le roi, le 

rwa e mor', vev IS rwa'. 

Lespinasse, de, de lespenas'. 

^ L'Estrange (Sir Roger), les- 

trandz'. 



le style, c'est Thomme, 1^ 

stel', sa 16m'. 
Leszcynski, leschin'ske. 
lethargic, Isthar'dzik. 
lethargy, leth'ardzi. 
Lethe, le'the. 
Lethean, ISthe'an. 
lettre de cachet, let'r' de 

kashe'. 
leuch (Scot.), liuCH. 
Leucophryne, liukofri'ne . 
Leucothea, liukSth'ea. 
Leucothoe, liuk5th'6e. 
Leuk, loik. 
leuk (Scot.), liuk. 
Leukas, lyef kas. 
Leuthen, loi'ten. 
Leuwenhoeck, van, vSn 

lav'enhook. 
levant, ISvant'. 

So pronounced as common or 
proper noun, or in any meaning 
except the law term, which is 
Uvant', 

Levantine, ISyan'tin, lev'- 

antin. 
levee (embankment), lev'fe, 

leve'. 
In the sense of a reception the 
second is preferable. 

lever, le'ver, lev'er. 
Lever (Charles), le'ver. 



ohtt iu = u in use, Am, up, circus, menu, food, foot, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



146 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Leverrier, leverya'. 
y Lewes (George Henry), 
/ liu'is. 

^. Leyden, li'den. 
V liaison, leazon'. 

Hard, lyar. 

libelant, libelant. 
y:, liberticide, liber'tisid. 
O^' libertine, lib'ertin. 

lichen, li'ken, lich'en. 

lichwake (Scot.), lich'wak, 
leCH'wak. 

Licinus, IJs'inus. 

Liebig, le'biCH. 

Liebknecht, lep'kneCHt. 

Liederkranz, le'derkrants. 

lief, lef. 

Liege, Isez'. 

lien, le'^n, len. 

lieu, liu, loo. 

lieutenant, li u t e n ' a n t ; 
(Brit.), leften'ant. 

lifelong, lif 16n. 

Cf. livelong. 
Ligny, lenye'. 
Li Hung Chang, le hoong 

chan'. 
Liliuokalani,Iel§6o6kala'ne. 
Lille, lei. 
Lilliput, lil'ipiit. 
Lilliputian, lilipiu'shan. 

ale, senate, c&re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov€r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



lima, llm'a. 

Commonly so pronounced as 
the name of a bean, but often 
lemd in such names as lima barky 
lima wood. 

Lima, le'ma; (Ang.), li'ma. 

Commonly the second as a 

place name in the United States. 

limn, lim. 
limner, lim'ner. 
Limoges, lemoz'. 
limousine, lemoozen'; (col- 
loquially), lim'uzen. 
lingerie, lan'z're. 
Linlithgow, Imlith'go. 
Linnsean, line'an. 
Linnaeus, line'fis. 
linotype, lin'6tip. 
liqueur, le'kor', likiur'. 
lira, le'ra. 
Lisle (Ang.), lil; (Fr.), leL 

As an adjective {Jiisle thread) 
it is III. 

Liszt, list. 

liter, le'ter. ' 

literati, litera'ti. 

literatim, litera'tim. 

Jithe, li^i. 

lithesome, litfe'som. 

lithy, litfe'i, litb'i. 

litigious, litidz'us. 

litre, le'ter; (Fr.), letr\ 

litterateur, letarator'. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



147 



littoral, Iit'6ral. 
Littre, letra^ 
liturgic, litur'dzik. 
liturgy, lit'iirdzi. 

livelong, liv'lon. 

Cf. lifelong. 
livre, levr; (Ang.), le'ver. 
llama, 13,'mS. 
llano, la'no. 
Llewellyn, looel'm. 
loath, loth, 
loathe, loth, 
locale, 16kal'. 
locative, 15k'Mv. 
loch (Scot.), 15CH. 
Lochaber, ISCH^'b^r. 
Loch Eil, loCH el. 
Lochinvar, 16CH]fnv&r'. 
Loch Katrine, 16CH k&V- 

rin. 
Loch Leven, 16CH le'ven. 
Loch Lomond, 15CH lo'- 

mond. 
locomotive, lokomo'tiv. 
Locrine, lokren'. 
Lodore, 16dor'. 
Lodovico, lodove'ko. 
Lodz, loodz. 
Loeb, lob. 

loggia, 15dz'a, 16'dzia. 
logomachy, 16g6m'aki. 



logy, lo'gi. 

Lohengrin, lo'engrin. 

Loire, Iwar. 

Loki, lo'kg. 

Longchamp, 16nsh3,n'. 

longevity, londzev'itL 

Longimanus, 16ndzima'nfls. 

Longinus, 15ndzi'nus. 

Longwy, lon'we'. 

Loos, 166s'. 

Lope de Vega Carpio, lo'pa 

da va'gS, kar'pyo. 
Lopez, lo'pas; (Span.), lo'- 

path. 
Lorelei, lo'reli, 15r'eli. 
lorgnette, lornySt'. 
Lorrain, lOran'. 
Lorraine, 16ran'. 
losable, looz'ab'l. 
Los Angeles, los ^n'gSles, 

15s ^n'dzeles; (Sp.), los 

an'halas. 

losel, lo'zel, looz'el. 

The Oxford Dictionary gives 
only the first. 

loth, loth. 

Lothario, 16tha'rio. 

Loti, Pierre, pyar' 16te'. 

Lotophagi, 16t5f'lLdzi. 

lough, 15CH. 



bhr, iu = u in use, <irn, up, circus, menu, food, f6&t, out, oil, ai^gle, payt, thin," 
Ibat, a^ure, CIJ*Qerw. kA, n (Fr,) mon, 3ee complete key, pages 15-20, 



148 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Louis Quatorze, looe' ka- 
torz'; (Ang.), loo'i, 
loo 'is. 

So also Louis Quinze {kdnz), 
Louis Seize (sdz), Louis Treize 
(trdz). 

Louisville, loo'isvil, loo'- 

ivil. 
loun (Scot.), loon, 
lour, lour. 
Lourdes, loord. 
lout (Scot.), lout, 
louther (Scot.), lootli'er. 
Louvain, loovan'. 
Louvre, loo'vr'. 
low (Scot.), lou. 
lower, lou'er, lo'er. 

The first is the intransitive 
verb; the second, the transitive 
verb and the adjective. 

Lowicz, 16'vich. 
lown (Scot.), loon. 
Loyola, ISyo'la, loio'la. 
Lublin, lyoo'blySn. 
Lucania, liuka'nia. 
Lucia, liu'shia, liu'sh^; (It.), 

looche'&. 
Lucia di Lammermoor, 

looche'^ de lam'^r- 

moor'. 
Lucknow, luk'nou. 
Lucrece, liukres'. 

ale, senate, cSre, at, accord, 5rm, Ssk, 
thgre. ov€r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Lucrezia Borgia, lookra'tsia 

bSi'dza. 
Ludwig, loot'viCH. 
Lugano, looga'no. 

luif (Scot.), loof, m. 

Luigi, looe'dze. 
Luis (Sp.), Iwes. 
lunch, lunch; (Brit.), lunsh. 
Luneville, llinavel'. 
Lupercal, liuperkal. 
Luray, liura'. 
Lurlei, loor'li. 
Lusitania, liusita'nia. 
Liitzen, liit'sen. 
Liitzow, Itit'so. 
Luxembourg, liiksanboor'. > 
Luxemburg, luks'embtirg. 
Luxor, liik'sor, look'sor. 
luxuriance, luksiu'rians, 
lugzdo'rians. 
So also luxuriant. 

luxury, luk'shoori, luks'- 

iuri, liig'zoori. 
Luzem, lootsern'. 
Luzerne (U. S.), liuztirn'. 
Luzon, loozon'; (Span.), 

loothon'. 
Lycaon, lika'Sn. 
lycee, lesa'. 
lyceum, llse'flm. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, i^nd, rec?nt, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



149 



Lycidas, lis'idas. 
Lyly (John), lil'i. 
Lyon, leon'. 

Lyonnaise, leOnaz', liSnaz'. 
Lyons, leon; (Ang.), li'ons. 
lyricism, lirlsiz^m. 



lyrism, lir'iz'm, lir'iz^m. 
lyrist, lir'ist, lir'ist. 

The Oxford Dictionary recog- 
nizes only the first. 

Lys, les. 
Lysias, lis'ias. 



ohr, iu = u in use, Am, fip, circus, menu, food, fd6t, out, oil, aijgle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Ft.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



M 



Maas, mas. 
Macao, mak5,'6. 
Maccabseus, makabe'us. 
ma chere, ma shlir'. 
machete, macha'ta; (Ang.), 

machet'i. 
Machias, machi'as. 
Machiavel, mak'iavel. 
Machiavelian, makiavSl'- 

ian, makiaveryan. 
Machiavelism, mS-kiavel'- 

izm. 
Machiavelli, m&k'yavgl'le. 
machicolation, machikola'- 

shun. 
machination, makina'shun. 
Mackay (Charles), maki'. 
Mackaye (James Steele), 

maki'. 
So also Percy Mackaye. 

Mackinac, mak'ino. 
Maclaren, Ian, ean mak- 

la'ren. 
Macleod, makloud'. 
Maclise, makles'. 
MacMahon, makmaon'. 
MacMonnies, makmiin'iz. 

ale, senate, c&re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov^r. Eden, ice^ ill, 5ld. obey, 6rb, 



macon (wine), m3,k6n. 

So pronounced, also, as a 
French place name {Mdcon)) 
but as an American place name, 
it is ma'kon, 

macrocosm, mak'r8k5zm. 

macron, ma'krSn, mS'kr5n. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

madam, mad'am. 
madame, madam', madS-m', 

mad'am. 
madeira, made'ra, mada'rlL. 
British usage does not sanction 
the second. The sound of the 
proper noun is the same. 

mademoiselle, madmwazel'. 
madras, madras'. 

The soimd of the proper name 
is the same. 

madre, mad'ra. 

Madrid, madrid'; (Sp.),ma' 

dreth'. 
maelstrom, mal'str6m. 
maestoso, mS,esto'so, ma6s- 

to'zo. 
Maestricht, m§,s'triCHt. 
maestro, maes'tro. 
Maeterlinck, materlink. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, ^nd, recent, 
I c5fifee, 6dd, c6nnect, lemdn, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



151 



Mafeking, m§.'feking. 

maffia, maf'fgS,. 

ma foi, ma' fwa'. 

magazine, magS,zen'. 

Magdala, mag'dala. 

magdalen, mag'dalSn. 

Magdalen (College at Ox- 
ford), mod'lin. 

Magdalene (College at 
Cambridge), mod'lin. 

Magdeburg, m a g ' d e - 
b66rCH;(Ang.),mag'- 
dSbftrg. 

Magellan, m a d z g 1 ' a n ; 
(Brit.), magSl'an. 

Magendie, mazande'. 

Magenta, madzen'ta. 

Maggiore, maddzo'ra. 

Magi, ma'dzi. 

Magna Charta, mSg'na 
kar'ta. 

magneto, magne'to. 

So sounded universally in gas- 
engine parlance. As a prefix 
(as in magneto-electric) it may 
be (but commonly is not) sound- 
ed mag'n&to, 

Ma'gog. 

maguey, mag'wa ; (Sp.) , ma- 

ga'e. 
Magyar, m5d'y^r; (Ang.), 

mag'yar. 



Mahabharata, mahaba'- 

rata. 
Mahan, mahan'. 
maharaja, mahar3,'dza. 
mahatma, mahat'ma. 
Mahdi, El, al ma'de. 
mahlstick, m§;l'stik, m61'- 

stik. 
Mahmoud, m5,m6od'. 
Mahomet, mahSm'et, ma'- 

hSmet, mS.'6met. 
Mahoimd, mahound', ma- 

hoond'. 
Mahratta, mSrat'a. 
Maia, ma'ylL, mi'a 
Mailly. 

See Camp de Mailly. 
Main (river), man; (Ger.), 

min. 
maintain, mantan', men- 
tan', 
maintenance, man'tSnans. 
Maintenon, de, de mant' 

non'. 
Mainz, mints, 
maitre d'hotel, ma'tr 

do'tel'. 
majolica, m&dzSl'ika, ma- 

ySl'ika. 
Also written maioUca. 

Malachi, mal'aki. 



ohr, iu = u in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, aijgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 
11 



152 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



maladroit, maladroit'. 
Malakhov (Russia), mala'- 

k6f. 
Malakoff (Fr.), malak6f'. 
Malaprop (Mrs.), mariL- 

pr5p. 
malapropos, malaprftpo'. 
Malay, mala', ma'la. 
Malchus, mal'kus. 
Malcolm, m^l'kom. 
mal de mer, mal de mar'. 
Maldive (Islands), mal'- 

div. 
Malebranche, de, de mal- 

bransh'. 
malefactor, mal'gfak'ter. 
maleficent, malef'isent. 
Malesherbes, malzerb'. 
^ malfeasance, malfe'zans, 
malign, malin'. 
Malines, malen'. 
malinger, malin'g^r. 
malingerer, malin'gdrer. 
malkin, mo'kin. 
mall, mol. 

Cf. PaU MaU. 
malleable, mal'gabl. 
mallecho. 

See miching mallecha 
malleolar, male'Olar. 
malleolus, malS'Slfis. 

ale, senate, c^re, at, accord, irm, ask, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



Malmaison, malma'zon. 
Malmesbury, mamz'beri. 
malmsey, mam'zi. 
Malplaquet, malplake'. 
malt, molt. 
Malta, mol'ta. 
Maltese, moltez', moltes'. 
Malthus, mal'thus. 
Malthusian, malthiu'zan, 

mS,lthiu'zJan. 
Malvern, mol'vern. 
mama. 
See mamma. 

Mambrino, mambre'no. 
Mamertine, mam'ertm, 

mam'erten. 
mamma, mama', ma'ma. 

"In educated use, so far as is 
known, the stress has in Eng- 
land always been on the last 
syllable; in the United States, 
however, the stress mam'ma is 
the more usual; a prevailing 
United States pronunciation is 
represented by the spelling momr 
ma, occasionally used in novels. 
The spelling mama, sometimes 
used in the 18th century, became 
somewhat common after 1800, 
and is especially frequent in the 
novels printed about 1830-50. 
It is now rare.'' Oxford Dic- 
tionary. 

manana, manya'na. 
Manasseh, manas'e. 
Manchu, manchoo'. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lenaidn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



153 



m an 'g 1 



Mandalay, mandala', man'- 

dala. 
mandamus, m^nda'mas. 
mandator, manda'tor. 
mandatory, man'datOri. 
mandragora, mandrag'dra. 
manege, manez'. 
manes, ma'nez. 
Manetho, man'stho. 
manganese, manganes', 

man'ganez. 
mange, mandz. 
mangel-wurzel, 

wtir'zl. 
mango, man'go. 
maniacal, mani'akal. 
Manichsean, manike'an. 
Manitd'ba, manitob^,'. 
Mannlicher, man'liCHer. 
manoeuvre, manoo'ver, 

maniu'ver. 
British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. The sound is the same 
when the word is spelled ma' 
neuver. 

Manon Lescaut, manon' 

lesko'. 
mansuetude, man'swStiud. 
Mantinea, mantSne'ya. 
Manuel Garcia, manwel' 

garthe'a. 
manumit, mSniumit'. 



Maori, ma'Sri, mou'ri. 
marabou, mar'aboo. 
Maracaibo, maraki'bo. 
Marah, ma'ra, mdr'a. 
Maranatha, maranath'd. 
maraschino, mSraske'no. 
Marat, mara'. 
Marchesa, marka'zS,. 
marchese, m&rka'za. 
marchioness, m^r'shones. 
Marconi, marko'ni. 
Mardi gras, mardS grS-'. 
mare clausum, ma're kl6'- 

sum. 
Marengo, maren'go. 
margarine, mar'gSren, 

mar'garin. 
Marie Antoinette, mare an- 

twanet'. 
Marie de Medicis, mare' 

de madeses'. 
Marie Therese, m&re'taraz'. 
Marino Falieri, mare'no 

fMye're. 
marital, marital, 
maritime, mar'itim, mSr'- 

itim. 
Marius, ma'rius. 
marjoram, mar'dzSram. 
Marjoribanks, mich'banks, 

mS.sh'bauks. 



Qhr, m = u in use, <irn, iip, circus, menu, food, f66t, out, oil, aijgle, part, thin, 
that, a;j;vire, CH =* Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20, 



154 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Marlborough, marl'bOrfi, 
morbru. 
Jones says that the first is 
often heard as applied to Lon- 
don streets, and to towns in New 
Zealand and America. The sec- 
ond is the name of the English 
town. 

Marmora, mar'mSra. 
Marne, mam; (Brit.), man. 
Marquand (H. G.), mar- 

kwand'. 
marquess, mar'kwes. 
Marquette, market^ 
marquis, mar'kwis. 
marquise, markez'; (Fr.), 

markez'. 
Marryat, mar'iat. 
Marseillaise, mS-rsgyaz' ; 

(Ang.), marselaz'. 
Marseille, marsa'y'. 
Marseilles, marsalz'. 
Marshalsea, mar'shalse. 
Marsyas, mS^r'sias. 
martinet, martinet', m5,r'- 

tmet. 
Marylebone, mdr'elebon, 

mar'ebon, mdr'ibon. 
Masaccio, mazat'cho. 
Masaniello, mazanyel'Io. 
Mascagni, maskan'ye. 
Mascarille, maskare'y\ 

ale, senate, cfire, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, Qv6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



masculine, mas'kiulin. 
maslin (Scot.), maz'lin. 
massage, masaz'. 
Massasoit, mas'asoit'. 
Massena, masana'. 
Massenet, mas'ne'. 
masseur, masor'. 
masseuse, masoz'. 
Massillon, maseyon'. 
mastoiditis, mastoidi'tis. 
Matabele, matabe'IS. 
matador, mat'ador. 
Mater Dolorosa, mater 

doloros'a. 
materfamilias, materfa- 

mil'ias. 
materiel, matar^el'. 
mathesis, mathe'sis. 
Mathilde, mateld'. 
matinee, matina'; (Brit.), 

mat'ina. 
matrices, mat'risez; (Lat.), 

mlLtri'sez. 
matricide, mat'risid. 
matrix, ma'triks. 
matron, ma'tron. 
matronly, ma'tronli. 
Matthew, math'iu. 
Matthias, mathi'as; (Ger.), 

mate'as. 
maturative, mS^tiur'ativ* 

sofa, lov&ble, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, 9ci^, connect, l^ip^p, 6 (Germ,) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



155 



matutinal, matiu'tinal. 
Maubeuge, moboz'. 
Mauch Chunk, mok chunk, 
mauger, mo'ger. 
Mauna Loa, mou'na lo'i. 
maunder, mon'd^r, man'- 
der. 
British usage recognizes only 
the first. 

Maupassant, Guy de, ge 

de mopasah^ 
Mauretania, m6rgta'iii&. 
Mauser, mou'zer. 
mausoleum, m6s61e'um. 
Mausolus, moso'lus. 
mauvaise honte, mSvazofit'. 
mauvais gout, m6ve' goo'. 
Mauvais Pas, m6ve' p&. 
mauvais quart -d'heure, 

m6ve' kar dor', 
mauve, mov. 
mavis, ma'vis. 
mavoumin, mavoor'nen. 
Maya, ma'ya. 
Mayence, mayans'. 
.mayonnaise, m a 6 n a z ' , 

maySnaz'. 
mayoralty, ma'oralti. 
Mazarin, mazaran'; (Ang.), 

mazSren'. 
mazarine, mazlLren'. 



Mazzini, mS^tse'ne. 
mear (Scot.), mer. 
meatus, mSa'tus. 
Meaux, mo. 

mecanicien, mek3,nesyM'. 
Mechlin, mek'lin; (Dutch), 

mgCH'lm. 
Mecklenburg - Schwerin, 

mek'lenboorCH shvS- 

ren'. 
Medea, mSde'S. 
Medicean, medice'an. 
Medici, de', da med'Sche. 
medicinable, mgdis'in&bl. 

In Shakespeare often rn^d^' 
slndbL 

medicinal, mSdis'inJl. 
medieval, medie'val, m6- 

die'val 
medievalize, mediev'aliz. 
Medina, mSdi'na. 
mediocre, me'dioker. 
mediocrity, medi5k'riti. 
Medoc, madSk'. 
meerschaum, mer'shom, 

mer'shom. 
megrim, me'grim. 
Mehemet Ali, ma'hemSt 

a'le, 
meikle (Scot.), me'kl. 
Meilhac, m^yak'. 

bhr, iu=u in use, Am, up, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
y%at, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



156 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Meissonier, mSsOnya'. 
meistersinger, mish'terzin'- 

ger; (Ang.), mis't^r- 

singer. 
Melanchthon, m S I S n k ' - 

thon, mfelS-nk'ton; 

(Ger.), m61anCH't6n. 
melange, malMz'. 
Melchizedek, mSlklfz'SdSk. 
Meleager, melSa'dzer. 
melee, mala'. 
Melita, m^niL 
melodrama, mel'6drima, 

mS16dra'mi. 
Melos, me'15s. 
Melpomene, mSlpSm'Sne. 
Melusina, mSliuse'nS-. 
Melusine, meliusen'. 
membraneous, mem'bri- 

nfis. 
memoir, mgm'w3,r, mem'- 

war 
menage, manaz', menaz'. 
menagerie, mSnSdz'eri, 

mSnaz'eri. 
Mendelssohn - Bartholdy, 

men'delson bartSlde'. 
Mendelyeev, mendyelya'- 

yei. 
Mendoza, de, da mendo'thS, ; 

(Ang.), da mendo'za. 

ale, senate, ctre, St, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ovdr, Eden, ice, ill, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



Menelaus, mgnSla'us. 
menhir, men'hSr, men'hir. 
Menin, menan. 
meningitis, menindzi'tis. 
mensuration, menshoora'- 

shun. 
Mentone, mento'na. 
menu, men'iu ; (Fr.) , menii'. 
In the United States it is often 
pronounced md'niu or im'niu, 

menyie (Scot.), men'yi- 

See assoilzie. 
Mephisto, mgfis'to. 
Mephistofelian, mefistSfe'- 
lean, mefistofele'an. 

So pronounced, also, when 
spelled Mephistophelean, 

mercantile, mer'kantil, 
mer'kantil. 

Mercator, merka'tor. 

Mercedes, mSrsa'thas; 
(Ang.), merse'dez. 

Merimee (Prosper), mare- 
ma'. 

meringue, merSng'. 

Merle d'Aubigne, merl 
doben'ya. 

Meroe, mer'Se, ma'rQa. 

Merom, me'rom. 

Merope, mer'Spe. 

Merovingian, mgrfivin'- 
dzian. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recSnt, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



157 



Merrilies (Meg), meg mer'- 

ilez. 
Merry del Val, merrS del 

val'. 
Mersey, mer'zi. 
Merveilleuse, merveyoz'. 
Merveilleux, merveyo'. 
mesalliance, mazalyans'. 
Cf. misalliance. 

mesdames, madam', 
mesdemoiselles, madmwa- 

zel'. 
mesentery, mes'enteri. 
Meshach, me'shak. 
mesmerism, mez'meriz'm. 
mesne, men. 
Mesopotamia, mes8p6ta'- 

mia. 
Mesozoic, mesSzo'ik. 
Messalina, mesali'nS,. 
Messaline, mesalen'. 
messeigneurs, mese'nyor'. 
Messianic, mesian'ik. 
Messidor, mesgd6r'. 
messieurs, mes'yerz; (Fr.), 

mesyo'. 
Messina, mese'na. 
Messines, mesen'. 
Messrs., mes'yers. 
messuage, mes'wEdz. 

ohr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menu, food, foot, out, oil, ai^gle, part, thin, 
^at, ajfure, CH = Germ. ich, it (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20, 



metalline, met'alin, m^t'- 

alln. 
metallurgic, metaltir'dzik. 
metallurgy, met'alurdzi. 
metamorphic, metamorfik. 
metamorphism, metamor'- 

fiz'm. 
metamorphose, metamor'- 

foz. 
metamorphosis, metamor'- 

fosis. 
Metastasio, matasta'zyo. 
metastasis, mStas'tasis. 
metempsychosis, metemp- 

siko'sis. 
meteorolite, me'tSorSIit. 
meteoroscope, me'tSorS- 

skop', metSor'Sskop. 
methol, meth'ol, meth'ol. 
Methuselah, methiu'sfela. 
methyl, meth'il. 
methylic, mSthil'ik. 
metic, met'ik. 
meticulous, metik'iulus. 
metonymy, met5n'imi. 
metope, met'Ope. 
metric, met'rik. 
metrist, me'trist, met'rist. 
The Oxford Dictionary does 
not recognize the first. 

metronymic, metrSnIm'ik. 



158 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



metropolitan, metrSp61'- 

itan. 
Mettemich, von, f6n met'- 

grniCH. 
Meudon, modon'. 
Meuse, moz; (Ang.), miuz. 
Meyerbeer, mi'erbar. 
Mezieres, mazyar'. 
mezza majolica, med'zS. 

mayol'ika. 
mezzanine, mez'anin, mez'- 

anen. 
mezza voce, med'zS. vo'cha. 
mezzo, med'zo. 
Mezzofanti, medzSfan'te. 
mezzo-relievo, med'zo rS- 

le'vo. 
mezzo-soprano, m 6 d ' z 6 

sSpr^'no. 
mezzotint, med'zStint. 
Miami, imam'i. 
miasma, miSz'mft. 
micaceous, mika'shsus. 
Micah, mi'ka. 
mi-careme, mekardm'. 
Michael, mi'kel. 

Sometimes formally (especial- 
ly in Biblical use) mlk'aeL 

Michael Angelo, mik'el an- 
dz'elo. 
See also Michelagnolo and 
Michel-Ange. 

ale, senate, cSre, at, accord, Srm, Ssk, 
there, over, Eden, ice, HI, old, obey, 6rb, 



Michaelmas, mik'elmas. 
Michel (Fr.), meshel'. 
Michelagnolo (It.), me'kel 
an'yolo. 
See also Michael Angelo and 
Michel-Ange. 

Michel -Ange (Fr.), mekel- 

&nz^ 
Michelangelo (It.), mekel- 

an'dzalo. 
Michelet, meshle'. 
miching, mich'ing, mech'- 

mg. 
mich'ing mallScho. 
Mickiewicz, mitskya'vich. 
microscopist,mikr5s'k6pist, 

mi'kr6skopist. 
microscopy, mikros'kSpi. 
Midas, mi'das. 
midsummer, mid'siimer, 

midsum'^r. 
midwinter, mid'wmt^r, 

midwin'ter. 
mien, men. 
Mignon, menyon'; (Ang.), 

min'yc^n. 
As an adjective or common 
noun the word is at home in 
English with the second pro- 
nunciation. 

mignonette, minyonet'. 
migraine, migran'. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent; 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



159 



Miguel, megel'. 
Mikado, mika'do. 
milady, mila'di. 
Milan, mfl'an. 

MUdn' is also allowed by 
some American authorities. 

milch, milch. 

miles gloriosus, mi'lez 

glorio'stis. 
Milesian, mile'shan, mile'- 

shan, mile'zan. 
milieu, melyo'. 
militarism, miritMs'm. 
militia, milish'a. 
Millais, mila'. 
Millet (Jean Francois), zan 

fran'swa' mele'. 
milliliter, mil'ileter. 
Milnes (Richard Moncton), 

milnz. 
Mile, mi'lo. 

Commonly so pronounced 
either as the name of the island 
(Venus of Milo) or that of the 
athlete of Crotona. The name 
of the island, however, is some- 
times rm'lo, 

milord, milor'. 

mim (Scot.), mim, mgm. 

mime, mim. 

mimetic, mimet'ik. 

min' (Scot.), min. 

minaret, min'irSt. 



Mincio, men'cho. 
Mindanao, mindana'6. 
mineralogy, min^ral'ddzi. 
miniature, min'iatiur. 
minie, min'ia; (Ang.), 

min'i. 
minnesinger, min'fesinger. 
minnie (Scot.), min'i. 
Minos, mi'n5s. 
Minotaur, min'6t6r. 
mint (Scot.), mSnt. 
minuet, miniuet'. 
minute, min'it. 
minutia, miniu'shlS. 
minutiae, miniu'shie. 
Miocene, mi'osen. 
Mirabeau, merabo';(Ang.), 

mir'abo. 
mirabile dictu, mirab'fle 

dik'too, mirSb'ne. 
Mirafiores, merMo'ras. 
mirage, mSr3,z'. 
Mirandola, mSrS,n'd813,. 
mird (Scot.), mird, mSrd. 
misalliance, misltli'S,ns. 

Cf. mesalliance, 
misca' (Scot.), miskd'. 
miscegenation, misSdzSna'- 

shun. 
mischieve (Scot.), mfe- 

chev'. 



bhr, iu=u in use, iirn, up, circus, menii, food, fd6t, out, oil, a^gle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, OH = Germ, ich, 6 (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 13-20. 



160 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



h 



mischievous, mis'chivus. 
mischievously, mis'chiv- 

ilslL 
misconstrue, mXsk5n'stroo, 

noJLskSnstroo'. 
mise-en-scene, mezMsAn'. 
Miserables, Les, la mez- 

ar3,'bL 
Miserere, mIzSre'rS. 
misfeasance, misfe'zSns. 
misfeasor, m!sfe'z8r. 
misken (Scot.), mJskgn'. 
mislear (Scot.), mfeler'. 
mislippen (Scot.), misUp'- 

gn, mislu'p§n. 
^nmisnomer, misno'mfer. 
^"misogynist, mfeSdz'inlst. 
Missolonghi, mfe6I5n'g§. 
misteuk (Scot.), mfetiuk'. 
mistletoe, mls'lto, miz'lto. 
mistral, mls'trSl, mfatrS,}'. 
mither (Scot.), mith'^r, 

mSth'^r. 
Mithridates, mithrida'tez. 
mitrailleuse, metriyoz'. 
mitral, nu'tr&l. 
Mizraim, miz'rSim, miz- 

ra'im. 
'vmnemon'ic, n§m6n'ik. 
Mnemosyne, nfemSs'ine. 

ale, senate, cAre, St, accord, arm, Ssk, 
^)iSre, ovfir, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb 



mobile, mo'bil, mo'bel. 

The Oxford • Dictionary gives 
only the first; Jones prefers 
mdlM. There is also the noun 
sounded as Latin, mo'Mle. 

mobilization, mobiliza'- 
shun, mdbiUza'shun. 
In either, the second i may be 
"long" ( — Izdshun), 

mobilize, mo'bfliz, mSb'iliz. 
Mocha, mo'kS.. 
Modena, m6'danS,. 
modicum, m5d'ikum. 
modiolar, m6di'61ar. 
modiste, mSdest'. 
Modjeska, modzgs'ka. 
modus operandi, mo'dus 

5pSran'di. 
modus Vivendi, mo'dus vi- 

ven'dl. 
Mceso-Goth, me'sS g5th. 
Mohammed, mShSm'ed. 
Mohave, mSha'vS. 

So pronounced, also, when 
spelled Mojave, 

Mohegan, m6he'gan. 
Mohican, mShe'klln. 
mohur, mo'her. 
moidore, moi'dSf. 
moiety, moi'Sti. 
moire, mwar, mwoy, mor. 
moire, mwara', mo'ra. 
Moki, mo'kS. 

sofa, lovable, eve, Svent, iSnd, reclnt, 
cSffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



161 



molecular, m61Sk'iular. 
molecule, morSkiul, mo'- 

ISkiuI. 
Moliere, mOlydr'. 
Molino del Rey, m81e'no 

del ra'. 
Moloch, mo'lSk. 
Molokai, molSka'S. 
Moltke, von, f6n m61t'ke. 
Moluccas, m61uk'lLZ. 
molybdenite, m61ib'dSnIt, 

m51ibde'mt. 
Molyneux, mul'inooks, 

mul'myooks, muriniu. 
monachal, mon'S-kSl. 
Monaco, mSn'ako. 
Mona Lisa, mo'na le'zS,. 
monarchic, m6nar'kik. 
mon cher, mon shdr'. 
monetary, m6ii'§tS;ri, mun'- 

gtarf. 
Monfalcone, monf§,lco'na. 
Mongol, m5n'g6L 
mongrel, miin'grSl, m6n'- 

grel. 
monism, mSn'iz'm, mo'- 

niz'm. 
monist, mSn'ist, mo'nist. 
Monmartre, m6nm5.r'tr\ 
monocle, mSn'ok'l. 
monody, m5n'6d!. 



monogamist, m8n5g'S,mfet. 
monogamous, m 6 n 5 g ' - 

&mus. 
monogamy, m6n6g'3,ml. 
monogram, m5n'6gra,m. 
monograph, m6n'6graf . 
monologist, m5n81'5dzist. 
monologue, m5n'615g. 
monomania, mSn&ma'niS,. 
monomaniac, m6n6ma'- 

m^k. 
monomaniacal, m5ndm&- 

ni'Skal. 
monoplane, mSn'ftplan. 
monopolization, mSn5p61I- 

za'shun, m6n6p61iza- 

shun. 
The Oxford Dictionary prefers 
the second. 

monosyllabic, mSnftsflSb'- 

ik. 
monosyllable, m6n'6sfl5,b'L 
monotheism, m5n'6thSiz'm. 
Monroe (James), munro'. 
Mons, mons. 
monseigneur, m6ns6ny or' ; 

(Ang.), mSnsfin'y^r. 
monsieur, mSsyo', m'syo'. 
monsignor, m5nse'ny 6r ; 

(It.), m6nsSny6r'. 
monsignore, mSnsSnyo'ra. 

bhr, iu=u in use, <irn, up, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, aijgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, h (Ft.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



162 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



monsignori, m6nsSnyo're. 
Montague, mSn'tagiu. 
Montaigne, m6ntan'y' ; 

(Ang.), m5ntan'. 
Montana, m5nta'nS,. 
Montauk, in5nt6k'. 
Mont Blanc, mon blan'. 
Montcalm, m5ntkam' ; 

(Fr.), monkalm'. 
Mont Cenis. 
See Cenis. 

Mont Cervin, mon sSrvM'. 
mont-de-piete, moii' d^ 

pyata'. 
Montdidier, mondedya'. 
Monte Cristo, montS 

kres'to. 
Montefiore, mSntSfSo'rS. 
Montenegrin, m5nt^ne'- 

grin, mSntSnSg'rfn. 
Montenegro, m5ntSne'gro, 

montSna'gro. 
Monterey, mSntera; (Sp.), 

montSra'. 
Monte Santo, mon'ta s&n'- 

to. 
Montmirail, m6nmera'y'. 
mon vieux, m6n vyo'. 
moor, moor, mor. 
Moore (Thomas), moor, 

m5r. 

ale, senlite, cAre, St, accord, arm, ask, 
th«re, ov6r, Ed6n, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Moqui, mo'kS. 
moraine, mSran'. 
morale, m6ral', m&r§,l'. 
Moray, mur'S. 
morceau, morso'. 
mordant, mor'dant. 
Mordaunt, mor'dant. 
Mordecai, mor'deki, mor- 

dska'i. 
morganatic, morganat'ik. 
Morgante, mOrgan'ta. 
moribund, mor'ibiind. 
morion, mo'rion. 
morituri te salutamus, mor- 

itiu'ri te saliuta'mus. 
Morpheus, mor'fius, mor'- 

fSus. 
morphine, morfin, mor'- 

fen. 
Morrisania, morisa'nia. 
mortgagor, m6rg§.dz6r', 

morgidzer. 
Mosby, moz'bi. 
Moscheles, mSsh'elSs. 
Moscow, m5s'ko. 
Moskowa, mSs'kSva. 
Moslem, m5z'lem, m6s'- 

lem. 
mot, mo. 
motet, motet', 
motif, m6tef'. 

sofa, lovable, eve, ievent, ^nd, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



1G3 



mou, mow (Scot.), moo. 
moudie (Scot.), moo'di, 

mou'di. 
moudiwarp (Scot.), moo'- 

diwarp. 
Moulin Rouge, moolan' 

rooz. 
Mounet -Sully, m oo n e ' 

stile'. 
Mount Desert, mount d§z- 

ert', mount dez'ert. 
mousquetaire, moosketar'. 
mousseline de soie, moos- 

len' de swk\ 
mow (subst.), mou; (verb), 

mo. 
The substantive is mou as 
meaning a heapj as haymow; as 
meaning a derisive grimace, it is 
mou or rrio. The verb is mo as 
meaning to cut dovm; as mean- 
ing to heap, it is m>ou. 

moyen age, mwayan' naz'. 
Mozart, moz'art; (Ger.), 

mo'ts&rt. 
muezzin, miuez'in. 
muil (Scot.), mtil. 
Muir, miur. 
muir (Scot.), miir. 
mulct, mulkt. 
muleteer, minister'. 
Miilhausen, miilhou'zSn. 

ohr, iu=u in use, <irn, iip, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, a^gle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CII = Germ. ich^ n {Ft.) rnon. See complete key, pages 16-20 



mullein, miirin. 

Miiller (Max) , miir^r ; 

(Ang.), mirer. 
muciparous, multip'S,rus. 
Munchausen (Baron) , 

muncho'sen. 
Miinchen, mtin'CHen. 
Miinchhausen, von, fftn 

miinCH'houzen. 
Munich, miu'nik. 
Munkacsy, moon'kS^chfe. 
Murat, miira'. 
Murillo, moorel'yo; (Ang.), 

miuriro. 
murrain, mur'in. 
muscadine, miis'kSdin, 

mus'kadin. 
muscat, mus'kSt. 
muscatel, muskat^F. 
museum, miuze'fim, miu'- 

zeiim. 
Dictionaries do not recognize 
the second, but it is widely 
current. 

musicale, miuzikal'. 
Musset, mtise'. 
mustache, mustash', moos- 
tash'. 
British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

muzhik, moozik', moo'zik. 



164 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Mycale, mik'ale. 
Mycenae, mise'nS. 
myope, mi'op. 
myopia, mio'pia. 
myopic, mi6p'ik. 



myrmidon, miir'mtdSn. 
Mysia, mish'ia. 
Mysore, misor'. 
Mytilene, mitilenS, mitil- 
ye'nyg. 



ale, senfete, oftre, St, Sccord, Srm, Ssk, sofS, lov&ble, eve, Svent, !5nd, recent, 
th5re, ov6r, Eden, ice, lU, old, obey, 6rb, coffee, odd, counect, lem6n, 6 (Germ.) 



N 



Naaman, na'aman. 
nabob, na'b6b. 
Nagasaki, na'gasa'kS. 
Nahant, nahant'. 
naiad, na'yad, ni'ad. 
naiades, na'yadez, ni'adez. 
naif, naef '. 
naissant, nE'sant; (Fr.), n6- 

V • / 

san . 
naive, naev'. 
naivete, naevta'. 
Namur, namur'. 
Nancy,nan'si; (Fr.),nanse'. 
Nankin, nSnkin', nanken'. 
Nanking, nankmg'. 
Nanon'. 
Nan'sen. 

Nantes, nants; (Fr.), nant. 
Naomi, na'omi, nSo'mi, 

na'6mi. 
nape, nap. 
naphtha, naf'thlL. 
Napier (Sir Charles), nap'- 

yer. 
Napoli, ni'pftle. 
nargile, n&r'gflS. 



Narvaez, de, da nSrva'ath. 
narwhal, n§,r'hw5,l. 
Nassau, n^s'6; (Ger.), na'- 

sou; (Fr.), naso'. 
natal, na'tS,!. 
Natal, nSta^r. 
natatorial, natdto'rilLI. 
natatorium, natato'rium. 
natheless, nath'les. 
national, nash'unal. 
nausea, n6'sh§S, n6sSa. 
nauseate, no'shSat. 
nauseous, no'shGs, n6'- 

shSus. 
Nausicaa, nosik'SS. 
Nautch, noch. 
Navajo, n^v'aho. 
Navesink, n3,v'esink, na'- 

vesink, nev'v^Jnk. 
Nazarene, n^zaren'. 
Nazarite, naz'irit. 
Nebuchadnezzar, nfebiu- 

kadnSz'ar. 
nebula, neb'iul^. 
necrology, nekr51'6d?i. 
necromancy, nSk'rSmSnsi. 



ohr, iu=u in use, Am, up, circfis, menu, food, fd&t, out, oil, aogle, part, thin, 
y^at, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



166 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



nee, na. 
negate, niSgat'. 
neglige, nagleza'. 
negotiable, nSgo'shiab'l. 
negotiate, nSgo'shiat. 
neither, ne'thSr, ni'tfefer. 
Nemea, ne'mSa, nSme'a. 

So also Nemean, which Shake- 
speare makes nB'm^dn, and 
Browning rhymes with plebeian. 

Nemesis, nem'Ssis. 
nemine dissentiente, n6m'- 

ine disenshien'te. 
neo, ne'8. 

neologism, n§51'Sdziz'm. 
neophyte, ne'&fit. 
Neoptolemus, neSptSl'S- 

mfts. 
nephew, nef'iu, nev'iu. 
nephritic, nSfrit'ik, ngfrit'- 

ik. 
nephritis, nSfri'tis, nefri'tis. 
Nepissing, ngp'isin. 
nepotism, nep'Stiz'm. 
Nereid, ne'risid. 
Nereides, nere'idez. 
Nerens, ne'rius. 
Nerissa, n§ris'S. 
nervose, n^r'vos, n^rvos'. 
nescience, n6sh'i§ns, ngsh'- 

ens. 

ale, senate, cfire, St, accord, Srm, ask, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, HI, old, obey, drb, 



nescient, nesh'ient, nesh'- 

ent. 
Nesselrode, nes'elrode, 

nes'elrod; (Russ.), 

nes'elrodye. 
n'est-ce pas, nespS,'. 
nestle, nes^l. 

nestling, nest'ling, nes'ling. 
Neufchatel, noshatel'. 
Neuilly, noeye'. 
neuk (Scot.), niuk, nyook. 
neurasthenia, niurasthe'- 

nia, niurasthSni'a. 
neurasthenic, niurasthen'- 

ik. 
neuritis, niuri'tis. 
neuter, niu't^r. 
neutral, niut'ral. 
Neuve Chapelle, nov 

shapel'. 
Neuville - Saint - Vaast, 

novel' san vast'. 
Neva, ne'va; (Russ.), 

nygva'. 
Nevskii Prospekt, ngf'skyi 

prospekt'. 
Newfoundland, niu'fund- 

land. 

As an attributive, usually 
niufound'ldnd. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent; 
coffee, odd, cSnnect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



167 



Newnham (College), niun'- 

am. 
New Orleans, niu or'lSanz. 
Ney (Marshal), na. 
Nez Perce, na persa'. 
Ngami (Lake), n'ga'me. 
Niagara, niag'ara. 
Nibelungenlied, ne'b^loon- 

genlet. 
Nibelungs, ne'beloongz. 
Nicsea, nise'a. 
Nicaragua, nikara'gwa. 
Nicaragua!!, nikari'gwan, 

nikarag'iuSn. 
Nice, nes. 

Nicene, ni'sen, nisen'. 
nicety, ni'sfeti. 
Nicolette, nekSlSt'. 
nicotine, nik'Stm, nlk'8ten. 
Niebuhr, ne'boor. 
Niemen, ne'mSn. 
Nietzsche, ne'chS. 
Nieuport, neopor'. 
Nieuw Amsterdam, nyiiv 

amsterdam'. 
Nigel, ni'dzel. 
Niger, ni'dz^r- 
night cowl (Scot.), n6CHt^ 

kool. 
nihilism, lu'hJliz'm. 
nihilist, nihilist. 



Nike-Apteros, ni'ke Sp'- 

tgrSs. 
Nike of Samothrace, ni'kS 

6v sam'fithras. 
Nikolaev, nyekSlyS'gf. 
Nimes, nem. 
n'importe, nSnpSrt'. 
Niobe, ni'6be. 
Nipissing, nip'Mng. 
Nippon, nip'p5n. 
Nirvana, nSj^i'nSr, nfirvi'- 

nS,. 
Nish, nSsh. 
ni'si. 

ni'si pri'us. 
Nismes, nem. 
ni'sfis. 

nit (Scot.), nit, n6t. 
nitrogenize, nItr5dz'Sniz. 
nitrogenous, mtr6d?'Snfls. 
nitro-glycerin, nit'rS glis'- 

grin. 
Nivemais, nevSmS'. 
Nizhni-Novgorod, ne'zne 

n6v'g6r5d, fiy6z'ny§ 

nov'gSrSt. 
Noailles, de, d6 nSi'y'. 
Nobel, n8bel'. 
nobless, nSblgs'. 
noblesse oblige, n8blgs' 

Sblez'. 

bhr, iu"U in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, food, f68t, out, oil, a^gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ur©, CH = Germ. »cA, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 
12 



168 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



nocht (Scot.), nSCHt, 

n8CHt. 
Noctes Ambrosianse, n6k'- 

tez ambrozia'ne, Sm- 

brozia'ne. 
nodose, no'dos, nSdos'. 
nodulose, nSd'iulos, nSdiu- 

los'. 
Noel, no'el; (Fr.), nSgl'. 
nolle prosequi, n61'g pr5s'- 

ekwi. 
nomad, no'mSd, n6m'ad. 

Dictionaries prefer the second, 
but users of the word do not. 

nomadic, nOmSd'ik. 

nom de guerre, non de ger'. 

nom de plume, non d6 

pliim'. 
nomenclature, no'm§nkla- 

tiur. 
nonage, nSn'lidz, no'nSdz. 

The order of preference is said 
to be reversed when the word 
means a ninth part. The Oxford 
Dictionary gives only non'ad^ 
for either meaning. 

nonagenarian, n6nadz§na'- 

rian. 
nonchalance, nSn'shalans ; 

(Fr.), nonshalans'. 
nonchalant, non'shalant ; 

(Fr.), n6nshalan'. 
Nones, nonz. 

ale, senate, cSre, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov6r» Eden, icd, l\\, old, obey, 6rb, 



nonpareil, nonparel'. 
non sans droict, non sanz 
droit'. 
The phrase has been Angli- 
cized as a heraldic motto. 

non sequitur, n6n sgk'- 

wnitur. 
noose, noos. 

Nordau (Max), n6r'dou. 
Norwich, nSr'idz. 

So pronounced as the name 
of the English town (as in the 
nursery rhyme); but as an 
American place name, most com- 
monly ndfufich. 

nostalgia, nSstal'dzi^. 
Nostradamus, nSstrada'- 

mus. 
nostrum, nSs'trum. 
nota bene, no'ta be'ne. 
notable, no'tab'l. 
Notre Dame, notr' dam'. 
Nottingham, not'ingam. 
nous avons change tout 

cela, noozavon' shanza' 

too sela'. 
nous verrons ce que nous 

verrons, noo veron' 

s'kenoo veron'. 
Novalis, n6v3,'lis. 
Novo Goergievsk, n6v& 

geor'giSyefsk. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



169 



Novum Eboracum, no'vum 

eb5r'akiim. 
noyades, nwayad'. 
Noyon, nwayon'. 
nubile, niu'bil. 
nucleolus, niukle'olus. 
Nueces, nwa'sas. 
nugatory, niu'gat6ri. 
numismatic, niumizmat'ik. 
nimiismatist, niunuz'ma- 

tist, niunus'matist. 
Nunc Dimittis, nunk dimi'- 

tis. 



nuncio, nun'shio. 
nuncupative, ntin'kiupativ, 

nunkiu'pativ. 
nuncupatory, nun'kiupa- 

t8ri. 
Nimeaton, nun'etfin. 
Nunez, noon'ySth. 
nuptial, nup'shal. 
Nuyts (Islands), nits. 
Nyasa(Lake), ny3,'sa. 
nylghau, nil'go. 
Nystadt, nii'stat. 



Bhft iu»n in use, tLm, iip, oircds, mend, f58d, fS6t, out, oil, ai^gle, part, thifif 
y»at, a?ure, CH-Germ. ich, 6 (Fr.) mon, gee complete key, pages 16-20. 



o 



oases, oa'sez, o'asez. 



oasis, oa { 



o asis. 



Oaxaca, wS.hS,'ka. 
obduracy, 5b'diurasi. 
obdurate, 5b'diurSt, 5b- 
diu'rS,t. 

The second is practically ob- 
solete, but is preserved in poetry. 

obeisance, 6ba'sans, 6be'- 

sans. 

The second is allowed only in 
American usage. 

Ober Ammergau, o'b6r&m'- 

m^rgou. 
obfuscate, 5bfiis'kat, 5b'- 

fusk§,t. 

Obiit, 5b'iit. 

obit, o'bit, 5b'it. 

British usage prefers the sec- 
ond. 

obiter dicta, 5b'iter dik'ti. 

objet d'art, 6bze' dar'. 

objurgate, Sbdztir'gat, 5b'- 

dzGrgat. 
objurgatory, obdzAr'gatftri. 
oblation, 5bla'shun. 
obligatory, 5b'ligat8ri, 6b- 

lig'at6ri. 

ale, senate, cftre, St, accord, 5rm, Ssk, 
tijSre, OYtr, B4e»i ice, ill, q14, gbey, 6yb, 



oblique, 6blek', oblik'. 
oboe, o'boi, o'b6a. 
obol, 5b'ol, o'bol. 
obole, 5b'ol. 
obscurant, obskiur'ant. 
obscurantism, obskiur'- 

antiz'm. 
obscurantist, obskiur'an- 

tist. 
obsequies, 5b'sekwiz. 
obsequious, obse'kwius. 
obsequy, 5b's§kwi. 
obverse (adj.), 5b' vers, ob- 

vers'; (subst.), 5b'vers. 
occipital, 5ksip'ital. 
occiput, 5k'siput. 
occult, Okult'. 
Oceana, Sse'ana, oshfea'na. 
Oceania, oshSan'ia, oshSa'- 

nia. 
Oceanica, oshSan'ekS. 
Oceanus, Sse'anus. 
Ocelot, o's5l5t. 
ocherous, o'kerus. 
ochone, 5CHon'. 
ocht (Scot.), 5CHt. 
Ocklawaha, 5klawa'h&. 

sofa, lovable, eve, Svent, end, recSnti 

cplTeej odd, connQctf kvadu, g (Qeria.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



171 



Oconomowoc, 6kon'6m6- 

w5k. 
octahedron, oktahe'dron. 
octave, 5k'tS.v. 
Octavius, 5ktaV3Lus. 
octavo, 6kta'vo, 5ktav'o. 
octogenarian, 5kt6dzSna'- 

rian. 
octopus, 5k't8pus, 5kto'- 

p&s. 
The second is preserved in 
the dictionaries, it is even pre- 
fered by the Orford Dictionary, 
but does any living being ever 
use it? 

octoroon, SktSroon'. 
octroi, 5k'troi. 
octuple, 5k'tiup'l. 
od (force), 5d, od. 
odalisk, o'dalisk. 
odalisque, o'dalisk. 
odeon, 6de'5n. 
Odeon, odaon'. 
odious, o'dius. 
odium, o'dium. 
Odoacer, odOa'ser. 
odontalgia, odont^-I'dzia. 
odontology, od5nt5rSdzi, 

5d5nt5r8dzi. 
Odysseus, Sdis'ius, 6dis'- 

feus. 
Odyssey, 5d'isi. 



oedema, fede'ma. 
(Edipus, ed'ipus, e'dipus. 
ceil-de-bceuf, uy'debtif. 
Oenone, Sno'nS. 
Oersted, Ar'stetfe. 
Offenbach, Of'gnbaCH. 
officinal, ofls'inal, 5fisi'nal. 
often, of'n. 
ogee, 6dze'. 
Ogeechee, Sge'che. 
Ogier, o'dzier. 
ogive, o'dziv, o'dziv. 

The Oxford Dictionary gives 
od^lv' second, and does not recog- 
nize o'dziv, 

ohm, om. 

Oileus, oi'lius, oil'eus. 

Oise, waz. 

Okefenokee (Swamp), ok5- 

fSno'ke. 
Okhotsk (Sea), 6k5tsk'. 
Oklahoma, 6klaho'ma. 
okra, o'kra, 5k'ra. 
Okuma, o'kooma. 
oleander, olean'der. 
oleomargarine, olSSmar'- 

garen, olSftmar'garin. 
The popular sound of the 
word with the "soft g^^ (d?) is 
as yet recognized by the dic- 
tionaries only as a "common 
mispronunciation," but if they 
are to record the facts they must 
soon accept it. 



ohr, iu=u in use, Am, up, circus, menii, food, f66t, out, oil, aqgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 1&-20. 



172 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



olfactory, 6Ifak't6rL 
oligarchy, dl'igarki. 
oUa podrida, ol'a podre'dS,; 
(Sp.),oryapothre'tM. 
Olympiad, Olim'piad. 
Omaha, o'mah6. 
Omar Khayyam, o'mar ki- 
yam', kiyom'. 
Some authorities do not recog- 
nize the k sound, but allow only 
the CH, Cmydm\ CHlydm', 

omega, Sme'ga, o'mSga, 

Smeg'a. 
omicron, om'ikron, 6mi'- 

kron, omikr5n'. 
omniscience, 5mnish'ens. 
omniscient, ommsh'ent. 
Omphale, om'fale. 
on dit, on de'. 
Oneida, Sni'da. 
onerous, 5n'erus. 
Onesimus, Snes'imiis. 
Onesiphorus, onesif'Srus, 

on§sif'6rus. 
onomatopoeia, 5n6mat6- 

pe'ya, 6n5mat6pe'ya. 
Onondaga, onondo'ga. 
onyx, on'iks, o'niks. 
opal, o'pal. 

opaline, o'palin, o'palin. 
Ophir, o'fer. 

ale, senate, cSre, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov€r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Ophiucus, ofiiu'k&s, ofiiu'- 

kus. 
ophthalmia, dfthal'mia. 
ophthalmic, ofthal'mik. 
opinable, Opin'ab^. 
opine, Spin', 
opodeldoc, op6del'd6k. 
Oporto, 6p6r't66. 
opponent, opo'nent. 
opportunism,5p6rtiu'niz'm. 
opportunist, oportiu'nist. 
opprobrious, opro'brius. 
oppugn, 5pun'. 
oppugnant, opiig'nant. 
oppugner, 5piun'er. 
oral, o'ral. 

orange, 5r'endz, 5r'indz. 
orang-outang, Sran'ootan. 
orang-utan, Oran'ootan. 
orchestra, or'kestra. 
orchestral, drkes'tral, 6r'- 

kSstral. 
orchid, 6r'kid. 
orchis, or'kis. 
6rde'al, ordel', or'dSal. 

Dictionaries recognize no 
sound of this word save with 
the stress on the first syllable. 
It is high time they did, for the 
other two are certainly preva- 
lent, both in the United States 
and in England. 

ordinarily, or'dinS-rili. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



173 



ore, or. 


ornithorhyncus, oriuthS- 


Oreads, o'rSadz. 


rin'kus. 


Orestean, oreste'an. 


Orosius, oro'siiis. 


Orestes, 6res'tez. 


orotund, o'rOtund, 6r'- 


Orfeo ed Euridice, orfa'o 


Stund. 


ad aoore'decha. 


Orphean, 5rfe'an. 


Orian'a. 


Orpheus, or'fius. 


5'rigl. 


orrery, 6r'erJ. 


6'rient. 


orthoepic, or'thftep'ik. 


orien'tal. 


orthoepist, or'thSSpist, 6r- 


orientate, o'rientat, orien'- 


tho'Spist. 


tat. 


orthoepy, 6r'th6§pi. 


orifice, 5r'ifis. 


orthopedic, 6rth6pe'dik, 


oriflamme, 5r'iflSm. 


6rth6pgd'ik. 


Origen, 5r'idzen. 


orthopedist, orthOpe'dist, 


Orion, Sri'on. 


5rth5p'6dist. 


orison, 5r'izun. 


orthopedy, or'thOpedi, 5r- 


Orizaba, orSsa'bS,. 


th5p'6di. 


Oriando Furioso, orlan'do 


Osage, osadz, o'sadz'. 


fooreo'zo. 


Osawatomie, osaw5t'6mS. 


Oriando Innamorato, or- 


Osceola, 5sSo'la. 


lan'do enamora'to. 


osier, o'z^r. 


Orieanist, 6r'lSanist. 


6siris, osi'ris. 


Orieans, or'lSanz. 


Osier (Dr.), os'l^r. 


Orioff, 5rl5f'. 


osmose, 6s'mos, 5z'mos. 


Oriov (Prince), arlof. 


osmosis, 5smo'sis, 5zmo'sis. 


Ormazd, or'muzd, 6r'- 


ossein, 5s'Sin. 


mazd. 


osseous, 5s'gus. 


ormolu, or'mOloo. 


Ossian, 5sh'an. 


Ormuzd, or'muzd. 


Ossianic, 5shian'ik, osian'- 


ornament, or'nament. 


ik. 



bhr, iu=u in use, dm, up, circus, menu, food, fo&t, out, oil, ai?gle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20, 



174 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Ossining, 5s'imng. 

Ossoli, 8's61§. 

Ostend'. 

osteology, 5st§5r6dzi. 

osteopath, 5s'tS6pS,th. 

osteopathist, 5ste5p'athist. 

ostler, 5s'ler. 

ostracism, 5s'trSsiz'm. 

ostracize, os'trasiz. 

ostrich, 5s'trich. 

Ostrogoth, 5s'tr6g6th. 

Oswego, 5swe'go. 

Otaheite, otlLhe'tS. 

Otard, otar'. 

Otero, 6ta'r5. 

otiose, o'shios. 

otium cum dignitate, 

o'shiiim kiim digni- 

ta'te. 
Otran'ta. 
ottar, 6VkT. 
Ottawa, bVkwL 
Ottilie, Sterye. 
Ouachita, w6sh'it6. 
oubliette, oobleet'. 
Oudenarde (Battle of), 

oudenar'de. 
Oudh, oud. 
Oudinot, ooden6'. 
Ouida, we^dL 

ale, senite, cftre, St, accord, Srm, Ssk, 
thgre, ovSr, Eden, ice, ill, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



Oulchy-le-Chateau, ooshe' 

IS shato'. 
Ourcq, oork. 
Ouse, ooz. 
Ouseley, ooz'Ii, 
oust, oust, 
outby (Scot.), oot'bi, out'- 

bi. 
outre, ootra'. 
ouzel, oo'z'l. 
overseer, ov^rse'^r, o'v^r- 

se^r, overser'. 
overt, o'vert. 
Ovid, ov'id. 
oviparous, 6vip'arfis. 
ower (Scot.), ou'er, oer, or. 
So in compounds; as owerhye 
( — bl)j owerloup ( — loup), ower- 
ia'en ( — t&n), and the like. 

owsen (Scot.), ou'sen, ou'- 

zen. 
oxalic, oksal'ik. 
oxalis, ok'salis. 
Oxenstiem, 5k'senstern. 
Oxenstjema, 5k'sensherna, 

ook'sensherna. 
oxide, 5k'sid, 5k'sid. 
oyer, o'y^r, oi'dr. 
oyez, o'yes. 
ozone, o'zon. 

sofii, lovable, eve, event, 2nd, recent, 
, coffee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



pacha, pSsha', pash'S. 
pachisi, pache'si. 
Pachuca, pkchoo^kk. 
pachyderm, pak'iderm. 
pachydermatous, pakider'- 

matus. 
pacbydermous, ;iakider'- 

mus. 
Pactolus, pakto'lus. 
Paderewski, paderef'skS, 

paderes'kS. 
padre, pa'dra. 
padrone, padro'na. 
Padua, pad'iuS,. 
paean, pe'an. 
Psestum, pes'tiim. 
Paganini, pagane'ne. 
Pagliacci, I, e palya'che. 
Pahlavi, pa'lave. 
4)aillasse, palyas'. 
Paisiello, paSzyel'lo. 
Palsemon, pale'm5n. 
Palais de Justice, pale' d6 

ziistes. 
Palamedes, pal&me'dez. 
Palamon, pal'am5n. 
palanquin, palanken'. 

ohr, m=u in use, Am, up, circus, menii, food, f56t, out, oil, ai?gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



palatine, pSl'atin, pSl'lLtin. 
palaver, pala'ver, palav'er. 
paleolithic, palSolith'ik. 
paleontology, palgOntSl'- 

odzi. 
paleosaurus, pal§8s6'rfls. 
Paleozoic, palsSzo'ik. 
Palermo, pS,16r'mo, paler'- 

mo; (It.), p&lar'mo. 
Palestine, pal'estin. 
Palestrina, palestre'nS.. 
paletot, parSto, pal'to. 
palette, pal'et. 
Palfrey, pol'fri. 
Palinurus, paliniu'rus. 
Palissy, palese'. 
Palladium, pala'dium. 
Pallas, p^rS,s. 
palliative, p^riS^tlv. 
Pall-Mall, pgl'mgl', pal' 

mar. 

palm, pkm. 
Palmas, pil'mfe. 
palmer, pS^m'^f. 
palmist, pim'fet. 
palmistry, p^m^fetri. 
. palmy, p^m'i. 



176 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



palsied, p61'zid 
palsy, p6rzL 
paltry, pdl'tri. 
palustral, pS,lus'trlLl. 
palustrine, pS;lus'trin, pSl- 

us'trin. 
Pamela, p^m'felS,, pSme'l^. 
panacea, pS-nSse'S,. 
Panama, p^n^m&'. 
Panay, pini'. 
Pandora, pSndo'rS,. 
y,^ panegyric, pSnSdzJr'Jk. 
•' y panegyrize, pS-n'Sdziriz. 
Panhard, panS,r. 
Pan'dp^. 
pan6ra'mS. 
Pantagruel, pSntSg'roSSl ; 

(Fr.), p&ntagrtier. 
Pantheon, p^nthe'Sn, p5,n'- 

thg6n. 
Pantheon, le, 1ft p&nta6n'. 
Panurge, pSntlrdz; (Fr.), 

panlirz'. 
Paolo, p&'61o. 
papa, p&pS;', pk^-pL 

The second is now obsolete in 
England but is still current in 
the United States. 

Papagayo, pipSg&'yo. 
papaw, p^p6', p6'p6. 
Paphian, pa'Mn. 

ale, senate, c&re, at, accord, arm, Ssk, 
there, ovdr, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Paphos, pa'f6s. 
papier-mache, papya' mk- 

sha', pa'pya ma'sha. 
papist, pa'pist. 
Papua, p^p'ooS., pk^-pobk, 
papyrus, p&pi'rus. 
parabola, par^b'Slft. 
parabolic, p^r5,b51'ik. 
Paracelsus, pSrasSl'sus. 
paradigm, pSr'Sdim, pSr'-] 

adim. 
paradisean, pSridis'sSn. 
paradisiac, par&dis'iak. 
paradisiacal, paradisi'lLk3,l. 
Paradiso, II, el p5-rade'zo. 
paraffin, par'afin. 
paraffine, pS,r'afin, pSr'- 

afen. 
Paraguay, par'llgwa, pS^ra- 

gwi. 
parakeet, par'S,ket. 
parallelepiped, paralelSpi'- 

ped, paralelSpip'^d, 

paralelep'ipSd. 
parallelepipedon, paralglS- 

pip'Sdon. 
Paramaribo, pSrSmSr'ibo. 
paramour, par'amoor. 
paranoia, paranoica, 
paranoiac, pSranoi'Sk. 
parasite, pS.r'3,sit. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, «5nd, recent, 
cofiFee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



177 



parliamentary, p&rlimen'- 

tari. 
Parmesan, p&rmSzSn'. 
parole, pSrol'. 
parole d'honneur, p5,r61 

donor', 
paroquet, pSr'6ket. 
parquet, p3,rka', p§,rk6t'. 
parquette, parkSt'. 
Parsee, par'se, parse'. 
Parsifal, pS^r'sifal. 
Parthenon, par'thSnSn. 
Parthenope, p&rthen'8pe. 
Parthenopean, parthSnS- 

pe'an, paytheno'pSan. 
particeps criminis, par'ti- 

seps krim'inis. 
panire, parlir'. 
parvenu, p&r'v^niu; (Fr.), 

parv^nli'. 
Pascal, pSs'kal; (Fr.), pas- 

kal'. 
Paschal, pSs'kal. 
Paschendaele (Ang.), 

pSsh'endal. 
paseo, pasa'o. 
pasha, pS-sha', pash'S;. 
pashaw, pash6', pash'6. 
Pasiphae, pasif'Se. 
pasquinade, paskwinad'. 
passe, pS.sa'. 

bhr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menu, food, f66t, out, oil, aijigle, paft, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



parasitic, parasit'ik. 
parasol, par'5,s51, par&s51'. 
Parcae, par'se. 
parchesi, p^rche's]t, pS.che'- 
si. 
In either form the s often' has 
the sound of z. The word is 
variously spelled; pachisif par- 
chesi. 

parclose, par'kloz, par'klos. 
pardie, parde'. 
paregoric, pareg5r'ik. 
parent, par'ent. 
Parepa-Rosa, parep'^ ro'zft. 
paresis, pare'sis, pS-r'Ssis. 

Dictionaries prefer the sec- 
ond, but practice favors the first. 

paretic, paret'ik, pare'tJk. 
par excellence, pkr eksS- 

lans'. 
par exemple, par &gzkn^pV. 
parhelion, parhe'lion. 
pariah, pa'ria,pdr'i&,pari'S,. 
Parian, pa'rian. 
parietal, pari'etal. 
pari passu, pa'ri pas'iu. 
Parisian, pariz'an, pS-riz'- 

ian. 
Parisien, p5,resyan'. 
Parisienne, parezyen'. 
parlance, p§.r'lans. 
parliament, par'liment. 



178^ 



EVEKY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



passe-partout, p^s p§,rtoo'. 
passim, pas'im. 
pastel, pastel', pSs'tel. 

Dictionaries prefer the second, 
but the first is more widely used. 

Pasteur, pastor', 
pasteurize, pas't^rlz, pas- 

tor'iz. 
pasticcio, p3.stet'cho. 
pastil, pas'til. 
pastille, pastel'. 
pastor, pas'ter. 
pastorale, pas'tftr&'la. 
Patchogue, pS,chog'. 
patchouli, p^choo'li, p^ch'- 

6&U. 
pate, pat. 
pate, pat. 
pate, p3,ta'. 
pate de foie gras, p5,ta' d^ 

fwa gra'. 
paten, paten, 
patent, pat'ent, pa'tSnt. 
paterfamilias, paterfami'- 

lias. 
pater-noster, pa'ter nSstSr, 

p^t'er. 
pathos, pa'th5s. 
patine, pat'in. 
patio, pat'yo. 

ale, senate, c^re, at, acoord, arm, ask, 
there, ov6r, Eden, Ice, ill, did, obey, 6rb, 



patisserie, pates'eri; (Fr.), 

patesre'. 
patois, patwa', pSfwi. 
Pa'tras. 

patricide, pat'risid. 
patrimony, pS,t'rim6ni. 

patriot, pa'triSt, pSt'ri5t. 

So also patriotiCj patriotisTrif 
and the like. 

Patroclus, patro'klus. 

patrol, patrol'. 

patron, pa'trun, p^t'run. 

So also patronage^ patroness, 
and the like. 

patronymic, patr&nim'ik. 

Patti, pat'g. 

Pau, po. 

paughty (Scot.), • po't!, 

p^CH'ti, poCH'ti. 
Pauline (Epistles), pol'in, 

pol'in. 
Note that this is the sound of 
the adjective, not of the femi- 
nine name. 

Pauncefote (Julian), pons'- 

foot. 
paunch, panch, p6nch. 
Paupukkeewis, popukke'- 

wis. 
Paur, pour. 
Pavia, pave'a. 
paynim, pa'nJm. 
pearling (Scot.), perl'in. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



179 



gtnt, but this sound is scorned 
by the knowing ones. Yilnt is 
Swedish. 

Pegasus, pSg'&sSs. 
pegh (Scot.), pSCH. 
Peght (Scot.), pSCHt. 
peignoir, pSnwir'. 
Peirce, peys. 

The distinction in sound be- 
tween Pierce and Peirce is by 
no means universally observed 
by families bearing the names. 
Both forms seem to represent an 
older spelling of Percy, and to 
come from the verb pierce, for- 
merly pronounced pirs. See 
Pierce. 

Peixoto, pashot'6. 
pejorative, pe'dzftrStiv, pS- 

dz6r'atrv. 
Pekin, pekin'. 
Peking, pekKng'. 
pekoe, pe'ko, pgk'o. 

Usage favors the first in spite 
of the dictionaries. 

pelagic, p5lS,dz'ik. 
Pelagius, pSla'dzffls. 
Pelasgi, pfelS-s'dzI. 
Pelasgian, pS13,s'dziSn. 
Pelee (Mont), p^la'. 
Peleus, pe'lius, pe'lSus. 
Pelion (Mount), pe'liSn. 
pelisse, peles'. 
pellagra, pgl^'grS, pSIa'- 
gra. 

ohr, iu=u in use, Urn, iip, circfis, menu, food, f66t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 

IHat, ajfure, QJj5=G^yij), ich, n (Fr.) w(?rj, See complete key, pages X&-20, 



pearmain, pdr'man. 
pecan, pgkan', pSk^n'. 
peccant, p^k'ant. 
peccavi, p^ka'vi, pSkS<'ve. 
pech (Scot.), pSCH. 
pechan (Scot.), pgCH'Sn. 
pecuniary, pSkiu'niSrf. 
pedagogic, p5dag5dz'ik. 
pedagogical, p6dig5dz'ikal. 
pedagogism, ped'Sg5giz'm, 

pSd'SgSdziz'm. 
pedagogist, pSd'ig5dzist. 
pedagogue, p6d'ig5g. 
pedagoguery, pgd'&gSgrL 
pedagogy, ped'dgodzi, p6d'- 

&g6dzJ. 
pedal, pM'&l. 
pedant, p5d'3,nt. 
pedantism, pSd'Sntiz'm. 
pedantry, pSd'Hntrf. 
pedestal, ped'estal. 
pediatric, pediSt'rik, pSdl- 

kVrlk. 
pediatrics, pediSt'riks, p6- 

diat'rfks. 
pedometer, pSd6m'6t6r. 
Pedro, pe'dro, pa'dro. 
peenge (Scot.), pendz. 
Peer Gynt, pa'gr glint. 

This represents the Norwegian 
sound; the name may be said 
to be partly AngUcized as per 



180 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Pelleas and Ettarre, pel'- 

t^s and St&r'. 
Pelleas et Melisande, pala- 

S,s' a malesM'd'. 
pell-mell, pelmel'. 
pellucid, peliu'sid. 
Pelopidas, p615p'idas. 
Peloponnesian, pel6p6ne'- 

shan, pelSpone'zan. 
Peloponnesus, pel8p6ne'- 

sus. 
Pelops, pe'15ps. 
penal, pe'n&l. 
penalize, pe'n§,lize. 
penance, pen'ans. 
Penates, pSna'tez. 
penchant, pMsh&n', pen'- 

chant. 
Penelope, pi§n61'8p§. 
peninsula, pemn'siulS. 
penitentiary, peniten'sh&ri. 
penology, pSn51'8dzi. 
Penrhyn, pen'rm. 
Penrith, pen'rith. 
pension, pen'shun. 
Pentateuch, pen'tatiuk. 
Pentecost, pen't5k5st. 
Pentelic, pSntel'ik. 
Penthesilea, penthgsile'lL. 
Pentheus, pen'thius. 
penuchle, pe'ntik'l. 

ale, sen&te, o&re, tkt, accord, &rm, Ssk, 
tWre, over, Eddn, ice, fll, old, 6bey, Orb, 



penult, pe'nult, pfenult'. 

peony, pe'Oni. 

Pepin, pep'in. 

pepsin, pep'sin. 

Pepys, peps, pepis, peps. 

percale, perkal', perkal'. 

Percheron, per'sher6n, 

per'ch6r6n. 
Perdiccas, perdik'Ss. 
perdie, perde'. 
Perdita, per'dita. 
perdurable, perdiur'ab'l. 
pere, pdr. 

Pere Goriot, pdr goryo'. 
Pere Grandet, pdr gr&nde'. 
Pere Lachaise, pdr lashez'. 
peremptorily, per'empto- 

rili, peremp'torili. 
peremptory, per'emptSri, 

peremp't6ri. 
perfect (subst. and adj.), 

p^r'fekt; (verb), per- 

fekt', per'fekt. 

British usage prefers p^J^kt 
for the verb. 

perfected, perfek'ted, p^r'- 

fekted. 
perfidious, perfid'ifis. 
perfume (verb), p^yfium'; 

(subst.), pSr'fium, per- 

fium'. 

sofS, lov&ble, eve, 4vent, J5nd, reo?nt, 
coffee, odd, cdnneot, leja6s, jl^ (Gerpi.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



181 



persist, persist', 
personality, p^rsfinal'M. 
personalty, per'sunalti. 
personnel, pSrsSnel', per- 

s6nel'. 
perspective, p^rspek'tiv. 
perspicacity, perspikas'iti. 
perspicuity, perspikiu'iti. 
perspiration, perspira'shun. 
persuasive, perswa'siv. 
pertinacious, p^rtma'shSs. 
pertinacity, p^rtina'siti. 
perturbative, per'ttirbativ, 

perttir'bativ, p^rtiir'- 

bativ. 
Perugia, paroodzS,. 
Perugini, paroodze'ne. 
Perugino, paroodze'no. 
peruse, pgrooz'. 
Peschiera, paskya'rS,. 
peseta, pesa'ta. 
Peshawar, pesha'war. 
peso, pa'so. 
Pestalozzi, pestalSt'sS. 
Pesth, pest; (Hun.), pesht. 
petard, petard', 
petit, pet'i; (Fr.), p^te'. 
petite, p^tet'. 
Petrarch, pe'tr3.rk. 
petrel, pet'rel. 
Petrine, pe'trin, pe'trin. 

ohr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, food, fo6t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ. ich^ n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



perfunctory, p^j'funk'tOri. 
Pergamos, per'gam5s. 
pergola, per'gSla. 
peri, pe'ri. 

pericarditis, perikardi'tis. 
perigee, per'idze. 
perihelion, perihe'lion. 
perimeter, perim'ster. 
periceci, pgrie'si. 
periosteum, peri5s't5um. 
periphery, perif'eri. 
periphrasis, pSrifrSs'tik. 
perique, perek'. 
peritonitis, peritSiu'tis. 
permit (verb), permit'; 

(subst.), per'mit. 
Pemambuco, pern&mboo'- 

ko. 
Peronne, par8n'. 
perorate, per'6rat. 
peroration, per6ra'sh5n. 
perpetuity, perpfetiu'iti. 
perruquier, p e r ti k y a ' ; 

(Ang.), peroo'kier. 
Persephone, persef'6n§. 
Perseus, per'sius, per'sSus. 
Persia, per'sha, per'za. 
persiennes, persienz', per- 

shienz ; (Fr.) , persyenz'. 
persiflage, persgflaz', p^r'- 

siflaz. 



182 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Petrograd, pyetrograt'. 

But I have heard a traveler 
returned from the city itself 
since the revolution call it 
pdt'rogrddj nor did he reproach 
those of us who spoke of p^t^- 
rogrdd or petrograd. We have 
not yet settled on a standard 
Enghsh sound for the name. 

petrol, pet'rol, pet'rSl, pSt'- 

roL 
petrole, patr61'. 
Petruchio, petroo'chio, p§- 

troo'kio. 
pewit, pe'wit, piu'it. 
pfennig, pfennig. 
Phaeacians, f Sa'shanz. 
Phsedo, fe'do. 
Phaedra, fe'dra. 
Phsedrus, fe^drus. 
Phaethon, fa'eth5n. 
phagocyte, fag'6sit. 
phalange, f al'andz, f aland?', 
phalanges, falan'dzez. 
phalanstery, fariLnsteri. 
phalanx, fa'lanks, fal'anks. 
Phalaris, fal'aris. 
Pharaoh, fa'ro, fa'rSo. 
Pharisaic, farisa'ik. 
Pharisaism, far'isaiz'm. 
pharisean, farise'an. 
Pharisee, far'ise. I 

ale, senate, cAre, at, accord, arm, ask, 
thSre, ovfir, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



pharmaceutics, farmasiu'- 

tiks. 
pharmaceutist, farmasiu'- 

tist. 
pharmacist, far'maslfst. 
pharmacopoeia, farmakS- 

pe'ya. 
Pharos, fa'r5s, fa'rSs. 
Pharpar, far'par. 
pharyngeal, farin'dzSal, 

farindze'al. 
pharyngitis, farindzi'tis. 
pharyngology, faring51'- 

6dzi. 
pharyngotomy, faringSt'- 

6mi. 
pharynx, far'inks. 
Phedre, f^'dr'.' 
phenacetin, fSnas'stm. 
Phenice, feni'se, fe'nis. 
Phenix, fe'niks. 
phenol, fe'nol, fe'nol. 
phenyl, fe'ml, fen'il. - 
phial, fial. 
Phi Beta Kappa, fi be'ta 

ka'pa, fe ba'ta kap'pa. 
Often pronounced colloquially 
fl hd'ta kdp'a. 

Phidiac, fid'iak, fi'diak. 
Phidian, fid'ian. 
Phidias, fid'ias. 

sofa, lovable, eve, ivent, <Jnd, recent, 
cSffee, odd, cSnnect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



183 



Philse, fi'le. 

philanthropic, filanthr6p'- 
ik. 

philanthropist, filan'thrO- 
pist. 

philanthropy, filan'thrOpi. 

Philemon,* file'm5n. 

Philemon et Baucis, fela- 
mon' a boses'; (in Eng- 
lish file'm5n and bo'- 
sis). 

philhellene, filhel'en, fil'- 
helen. 

Philippe, felep'. 

Philippi, fnip'i. 

philippic, filip'ik. 

Philippine (Islands), fll'- 
ipin, fil'ipen; (Brit.), 
firipin. 

Philistine, filis'tin, fil'istm, 
fll'istin. 

Philoctetes, fil5kte'tez. 

philologian, filolodz'ian. 

philologic, fil615dz'ik. 

philologist, fflol'Odzist. 

philology, fflol'Sdzi. 

Philomela, fflOme'IS. 

philopena, fil6pe'na. 

philosophic, fil6s5f'ik. 

phlebitis, flSbi'tis. 

phlebotomize, fl5b6t'6miz. 



phlebotomy, flgbot'6nii. 
Phlegethon, fleg'Sth5n, 

fledz'ethon. 
phlegm, flem. 
phlegmatic, flegmat'ik. 
phlogiston, fl6dzis't6n. 
Phocion, fo'shion. 
phonic, fSn'ik, fo'nik. 
phonics, fon'iks, fo'niks. 
phonography, f6n5g'rafl. 
phonotype, fo'n6tip. 
phonotypy, fo'n6tipi, f6- 

nSt'ipi. 
phosphorus, f6s'f6rfls. 

Fdsfd^nis is given (second) as 
an allowable pronunciation of 
the adjective phosphorous y but 
it is preferably pronounced as 
is the noun. 

photogravure, fotSgraviur', 

fStSgra'viur. 
photometer, fotom'eter. 
phrenetic, frenet'ik. 
phrenitis, frSni'tis. 
phrenologic, frenOlodz'ik. 
phrenologist, fr5n61'6dzist. 
phrenology, frgn5r8dzi. 
Phryne, fri'nS. 
phthisic, tiz'ik. 
phthisical, tiz'ikal. 
phthisicky, tiz'iki. 
phthisis, thi'sis, fthisTis. 



bhr, iu=u in use, Am, up, circus, menu, food, f66t, out, oil, a^igle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich^ n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20, 

13 



184 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



phthongal, th6n'gal,fth5n'- 

gal. 
phylloxera, filokse'ra. 
phylogeny, fllodz'Sni. 
physalin, fis'alin. 
physalite, fis'alit. 
physicist, fiz'isist. 
physiognomic, fizi5gnom'- 

ik. 
physiognomist, fiziog'nO- 

mist. 
physiognomy, fiziog'nSmi. 
physique, fizek'. 
pi, pi, pe. 

Always the first as the print- 
er's term; usually the first as 
the name of the Greek letter. 

pia mater, pi'a ma'ter. 
pianissimo, peanis'imo, pya- 

nes'sSmo. 
pianist, pian'ist, pe'anist. 

American dictionaries give the 
two in this order, but it is a 
question whether usage is not 
in favor of the second. 

pianiste, pyanest'. 
piano, pian'o. 

As an adjective meaning softj 
loWf it has the Italian sound, 
pyd'no, 

piano-forte, pian'ofor'ta, 

pian'ofort'. 
piaster, pias'ter. 

ale, senate, c^re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ovti, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, drb, 



Piave, pyaVa. 

piazza, piaz 'a; (It.),pyatsS. ' 

Piazza, di Spagna, pyat'sa 

de spanya. 
Piazza Venezia, pyat'sa 

vanat'sea. 
pibroch (Scot.), pe'brSCH. 
pica, pi'ka. 
picador, pikador'. 
Picardy, pik'ardi. 
picayune, pikayoon'. 
Piccadilly, pikadiri, pik'- 

adili. 
Piccini, petche'ne. 
piccolo, pik'Slo. 
Piccolomini, pekk81o'm§ne. 
Pichegni, peshgrii'. 
pickaninny, pik'anmi. 
pickle (Scot.), pek'l. 
pickmaw (Scot.), pek'm6. 
picra, pik'ra, pi'kra. 
picric, pik'rik. 
pictam (Scot.), pektarn'. 
piebald, pi'bold. 
piece de resistance, pyes' 

de razestans'. 
pied, pid. 

Piedmont, ped'mSnt. 
Piemont, pyamon'. 
Piemonte, pyamon'ta. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent,' 
, coffee, odd, connect, lemon, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



185 



Pierce, pers. 

See note under Peirce. 

Pierian, pie'rian. 
Pierre, pyar. 

As the name of the city in 
South Dakota, per, 

Pierrot, pyerft'. 
piet (Scot.), pi'et. 
Pieta, La, la pyatS,'. 
pilaster, pilSs'ter. 
Pilatus (Mount), pSE'toos. 
pileate, pi'lSS,t, pireSt. 
pileated, pi'lSatSd, pil'Sat- 

ed. 
pilose, pi'los. 
Pilpai, pil'pi. 

Pinacotheca, pinS-kSthe'ki. 
Pinacothek, p](n'ak6thek ; 

(Ger.), penakotak'. 
pince-nez, pans na'. 
pincers, pin's^rz. 
pinchers, pin'cherz. 
Pinchot (Giflford), pin'sho. 
Pincio, Monte, mon'ta 

pen'cho. 
Pindaric, pindar'ik. 
Pin'dariis. 
pineal, pin'Sal. 
Pinero, pmer'o. 
pinge (Scot.), pendz. 
pinnatifid, pinat'ifid. 



Pinocchio, pSnok'yo. 

pinochle, pe'nok'l, pin'Sk'l. 

Pinsk, pSnsk. 

Pinzon, penthon'. 

Pio, pe'o. 

piquancy, pe'kansi, 

piquant, pe'kant. 

pique, pek. 

piquet, p6ket', peka', pik'gt. 

Piraeus, pire'us. 

Pirithous, pirith'6fis. 

pirouette, pirooSt'. 

Pisa, pe'sS,, pe'zS,. 

pis aller, pezala'. 

Pisano, Niccola, ne'koli 

pi§zS,'no. 
Piscataqua, piskat'akwd. 
piscatory, pis'klltSri. 
Pisces, pis'ez. 
piscina, pisi'nS,, pise'nS-. 
piscine, pis'in, pis'in. 
Pisistratus, pisis'tr&tus. 
pismire, pis'mir. 
pistache, pistash'; (Fr.), 

pestash'. 
pistachio, pist&'shio, pista'- 

chio, pista'chyo. 
pistole, pistol', 
pit (Scot.), pet. 
Pitti, pit'te. 
pituitary, pitiu'XtirL 



ohr, iu=u in use, dm, iip, circus, menu, food, fdot, out, oil, a^gle, paft, thin« 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 16-20, 



186 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Pizar'r5; (Sp.), pethar'ro; 

(Ang.), pizar'o. 
pizzicato, petsfeka'to. 
placable, pla'kab'l, plak'- 

Hba. 
placard, plak'ard, plakard'. 
placate, pla'kat, plak'at. 
placatory, pla'kat6ri,plak'- 

atSri. 

placer, plas'er, plas'er. 

In American Spanish, plds^r'; 
in Spanish, pldtMr\ 

plagiarism, pla'dziariz'm, 

pla'dzariz'm. 
plaid (Scot.), plad. 
plait, plat. 
planchette, planshet', plSn- 

chet'; (Fr.), pl&nshet'. 
Plantagenet, plantadz'Snet. 
plantain, plan'tS-n, plan'- 

tin. 
plaque, plak. 
plasma, plSz'ma. 
Plata, plk'tL 
Platsea, plMe'^. 
plateau, plS.to\ 
platinotype, piat'Knfitip, 

platin'6tip. 
platinum, pl^t'inflm. 
Platonist, pla't6nist. 
Plautus, pl6'tus. 

ale, senate, cfire, St, accord, Srm, ask 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



plaza, pE'za; (Sp.), pli'thS,. 

plead (past tense and past 
participle), pled; (pres- 
ent tense), pled. 

pleasance, plez'ans. 

plebeian, plebe'yan. 

plebiscite, pleb'isit. 

In the French form (ple- 
biscite), pldheset', 

plebiscitum, plebisi'tum. 
Pleiades, ple'yadez, pli'- 

adez. 
Pleiads, ple'yadz, pli'- 

adz. 
plein air, plan'dr. 
Plei'5n6. 

pleistocene, plis'tSsen. 
plenary, ple'nari, plen'ari. 
plenipotentiary, plenip6- 

ten'shiari, plenipSten'- 

shari. 
plenitude, plen'itiud. 
pleonasm, ple'6naz'm. 
plesiosaunis, plesi6s6'rus. 
plethora, pleth'6ra, ple- 

tho'ra. 
plethoric, plSth6'rik,plSth'- 

Srik. 
pleu (Scot.), pliu. 
pleurisy, ploo'risL 
pliocene, pli'Ssen. 

sofa, lovable, eve, ^vent, J5nd, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lem6n,_6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



187 



plisky (Scot.), plSs'kl. 
pliver (Scot.), plev'er. 
plot (Scot., to scold), pl6t. 
Plotinus, plSti'nus. 
plotty (Scot.), pl6ti. 
plover, pluv'^r. 
pluperfect, ploop^r'fekt, 

ploo'perfekt. 
plutocracy, ploot5k'rasi. 
Pnyx, niks, p'niks. 
pock (Scot.), p6k. 
pockmanty (Scot.), p8k- 

man'ti. 
pock-neuk (Scot.), pSk'- 

nyook, p6k'niuk. 
podagra, pfidag'r^, p6da'- 

grS, p5d'agra. 
poetaster, po'et^st^r, poS- 

tas'ter. 
poignancy, poin'ansi, poin'- 

yansi. 
poignant, poin'ant, poin'- 

yant. 
Poincare, pwMkara'. 
poinsettia, poinset'ia. 
point d'appui, pwSn da- 

pwe'. 
Poitevin, pwatvM'. 
Poitiers, pwatya'. 
Poitou, pwatoo'. 
Polaris, pSla'ris. 

ohr, iu = u in use, Arn, up, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, icht h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



Politian, polish'ian. 
Polk (James K.), pok. 
poll, pol. 

pollice verso, p51'ise ver'so. 
polonaise, pol6naz', p616- 

naz'. 
polony (Scot.), pSIo'ni. 
Polycletus, p51ikle'tfis. 
Polycrates, p61ik'rlLtez. 
Polydamas, polid'lLmas. 
Polydectes, p5Udek'tez. 
Polyeucte, pftleokt'. 
polygamist, p61ig'S,mist. 
polygamous, p6Iig'amfis. 
polygamy, pSli'g5,mi. 
polyglot, p6rigl5t. 
polyhedron, p61ihe'dr6n. 
Polynesia, pdline'shia. 
polype, pol'ip. 
Polyphemus, p51ife'mus. 
polyphony, pSlif 6ni, p51'- 

ifoni. 
polytheism, p51'IthSiz'm. 
pomace, pum'Ss. 
pomade, p6mad', p6mad'. 
pomatum, poma'tum. 
pomegranate, p6mgr^n'S.t. 
pommel, piim'el. 
Pomona, pSmo'n^. 
pompadour, p6m'p3,d66r, 

pom'pad6r. 



188 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



pompano, pSm'pano. 
Pompeia, p5mpa'ya. 
Pompeian, p5mpe'yan. 
Pompeii, p5mpe'ye. 
Ponce de Leon, pon'tha 

da laon'; (Ang.), p5ns 

d6 le'an. 
poncho, p5n'cho. 
Pondicherry, pSndisher'i, 

pSndicher'i. 
pone (as a law term, or in 

certain card games), 

po'ne; (as meaning an 

ash cake), pon. 
pongee, p6ndze', p5n'dze. 
poniard, p5n'yltrd. 
Poniatowski, p8nyat6f'sk5. 
pons asinorum, p5nz asino'- 

rum. 
pons varolii, p6nz varo'lii. 
Pont-a-Mousson, pont-a,- 

moos6n'. 
Pontchartrain (Lake), p6n- 

ch5,rtran'. 
Pontefract, pSn'tifrSkt; 

(locally), pum'frit. 
Ponte Vecchio, pon'ta vek'- 

eo. 
Pontifex Maximus, p6n'- 

tiffeks maks'imus. 
pontiff, p5n'tif. 

ale, sen&te, c&re, at, accord, §rm, 3sk, 
thSre, ov6r, Ed6n, ice, Xll, old, 6bey, drb, 



pontifical, p5ntif'ikal. 
pontifices, pontif'isez. 
Pontine (Marshes), p6n'- 

tin, p5n'tin. 
Pontius, p5n'shius, pon'- 

shus. 
Pont Neuf, pon nof. 
Poperinghe, poperang'; 

(Ang.), pop'erin. 
Popocatapetl, popSkat'- 

apetl, p6pokata'pet*l, 

p6pok§.t§,pet"L 

The first is the sound given 
the name by English-speaking 
residents of Mexico; the other 
two are found in the dictionaries. 

porphyry, por'firi. 

porpoise, por'pus. 

Por'sena. 

Porsen'na. 

Port au Prince, pSrtoprans', 

portoprins'. 

portcullis, pSrtkuI'is. 

porte-cochere, p6rt'koshdr'. 

porte-feuille, pSrtfo'y'- 

porte-monnaie, pDrtmOne', 

portent, por'tent. 

Porthos, p6rt8s'. 

Portici, p6r'tSche. 

portiere, p6rty^r'. 

portmanteau, p6rtman'to. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



189 



Porto Ferrajo, por't6ferra'- 

Porto Rico, por'to re'ko. 
Port Said, port saed'. 
Portuguese, por'tiugez, por- 
tiugez'. 
In either form the last syl- 
lable may be -ges. 

Portulaca, portiulak'a, por- 

tiula'ka. 
posaune, p6zou'n6. 
Poseidon, pOsi'don. 
posse, p5s'§. 
posse comitatus, p5s'§ k6- 

mita'tiis. 
possessory, p6zes'6ri. 
poste restante, p6st res- 

t&nt'. 
posterior, p5ste'rier. 
posthumous, p6s'tiumus. 
Posthumus, Leonatus, le8- 

na'tus pSsthiu'mus. 
post-obit, post 6b'it, post'- 

o'bit. 
potable, po'tab'l. 
pot-au-feu, pStofo'. 
Potemkin, p8tem'kin; 

(Russ.), patyom'kin. 
potential, pOten'shal. 
Potocka, potots'ka. 
Potocki, p6t6ts'kfe. 



Potosi, potSse'. 
pot pourri, popoore'. 
potsherd, p6t'sherd. 
pottingar (Scot.), pSt'in- 

gar. 
pouch (Scot.), pooch, 
pouchong, pou'ch6ng. 
pouk (Scot.), pook. 
pourboire, poorbwar'. 
pourparier, poorp3,rla'. 
pour prendre conge, poor 

prM'dr' konza'. 
pousse-cafe, poos'kafa'. 
Poussin, poosan'. 
pou sto, poo'sto', pou'sto'. 
pout (Scot., chick), poot. 
pouter (Scot.), poot'er. 
pouther (Scot.), poo'ther. 
pouthered (Scot.), poo'- 

tti^rd. 
poutry (Scot.), poo'tri. 
pow (Scot.), po. 
Powhatan, pouh&tan'. 
powter (Scot.), pou'ter. 
powther (Scot.), poo'ther. 
praecipe, pres'ipe, pre'sipe. 
Praed, prad. 
praemunire, premiuni're, 

premiuni're. 
Prseterita, preter'ita. 
praetorian, prgto'rian. 

bhr, iu=u in use, <irn, up, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, ai?gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ. ich, ix (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



190 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Prague, prag. 
Prairial, pra'rial, prer^al'. 
prairie, pra'ri, prar'i. 
Prairie du Chien, pra'ri or 

prdr'i dooshen'. 
Prakrit, pra'krit. 
praline, pra'len. 
pratique, prat'ik; (Fr.), 

pratek'. 
Praxitelean, praksitfele'an. 
Praxiteles, praksit'slez. 
prayer (a supplication), 

pr4r; (one who prays), 

pra'er. 
preamble, pre'amb'l, prfe- 

am'b'L 
prebend, preb'end. 
prebendal, prfeben'dal. 
prebendary, preb'endari. 
precedence, prSsed'ens, 

pres'edens. 

The second is frowned on by 
the lexicographers, but it is 
widely current. 

precedent, pres'fedent. 

precedented, pres'fedented. 

precentor, presen'tor. 

preceptory, prSsep'tSri. 

Precieuses Ridicules, Les, 

la prasyoz' redekul'. 

preciosity, preshiSs'iti. 

ale, senate, c&re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
thgre, ov€r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



precis, prase', pra'se. 
precocity, prSkos'iti. 
predatory, pred'atori. 
predecessor, predSses'Sr, 

predSsSs'er. 
predicatory, pred'ikatori. 
predilection, predilek'shun, 

predilek'shun. 
preface, pref'Es. 
prefacer, pref Sser. 
prefatory, pref'atori. 
prefect, pre'fekt. 
prefecture, pre'fektiur. 
preferable, pref'erab'l. 
preferment, prSfer'ment. 
prefet, prafa'. 
prefix (verb), prefiks'; 

(subst.), pre'fiks. 
prejudice, predz'oodis. 
prelacy, prerasi. 
prelate, prel'St. 
prelude, prel'iud, pre'liud. 
premature, premS^tiur', 

pre'matiur, prem'a- 

tiur. 

The first is the only sound in 
current use. 

premier, pre'mier, prem'- 

y^r. 

premise (subst.), prem'is; 
(verb), prgmiz'. 

sofa, lovable, eve, invent, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect , lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



191 



prenomen, preno men. 
preparative, prSpar'ativ. 
presage (subst.), pre'sadz; 

(verb), pr^sadz'. 
presbyter, prez'biter, pr6s'- 

biter. 
presbytery, prSz'biteri, 

pres'bitM. 
prescience, pre'shiens, 

prSsh'iens. 
prescient, pre'shient, prgsh'- 

ient. 
presidio, prSsid'io; (Span.), 

prase'dyo. 
Presque Isle, presk el'. 
prestidigitateur,prgstedeze- 

t&tor'. 
prestidigitator, prestididz'- 

itater. 
prestige, prestez', pres'- 

tidz.[ 
presumptuous, prSzump'- 

tiuus. 
pretense, prStens'. 
preterit, pret'erit. 
pretext, pre'tekst, prS- 

tekst'. 
pretty, prit^. 
preventive, prSvSn'tiv. 
Priapean, priape'an. 
Priapic, priSp'ik. 

bhr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, food, f66t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ. ich, ix (Ft.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



Priapus, pria'pus. 

Pribilof, prebgl5f'. 

prie-dieu, predyo'. 

prig (Scot.), preg. 

prima donna, pre'ma d6n'a. 

prima facie, pri'ma fa'shie. 

primarily, pri'mSrili. 

primates, prima'tez. 

primer (one who, or that 
which, primes), prim'- 
er; (an elementary 
school-book, a size of 
type), prim'^r. 

princess, prin'ses. 

Principe de Gales, prinse'- 
pa da ga'las. 

pristine, pris'tin, pris'tm. 

prithee, prith'e. 

probative, pro'bativ. 

proboscidean, probosid'- 
fean. 

proboscis, pr8b6s'is. 

process, prSs'Ss, pro'sSs. 

proces verbal, pr6se' ver- 
bal'. 

Procne, prSk'ne. 

Procrustean, prfikrus'tS; 

Procrustes, pr6krus'tez. 

procuracy, pr5k'iurasi. 

procurator, pr5k'iurat^r, 

procuress, prSkiu'rSs. 



ian. 



192 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



procureur, prfikiiror'. 
prodigy, pr5d'idzi. 
produce (verb), pr8dius'; 

(subst.), pr5d'ius. 
proem, pro'em. 
proemial, prSe'mial. 
Profeta, II, el profa'tS,. 
profile, pro'fil, pro'fel. 
prognathous, prSg'nathus. 
program, pro'gram, pro'- 

gram. 
progress (subst.), pr6g'res, 

pro'gres; (verb), pr6- 

grgs'. 
project (verb), prSdzekt'; 

(subst.), pr5dz'ekt. 
projectile, pr6dzek'til. 
prolepsis, prSlep'sis. 
proletariat, proleta'riat. 
prolix, pro'liks, prSliks'. 
prolocutor, prS16k'iut^r, 

pr5r6kiuter. 

prologue, pro'15g. 

PrdVdg also appears in the 
dictionaries, but seldom occurs 
elsewhere. 

promenade, pr5m§nad'. 

Prometheus, pr6me'thius, 

prome'thSus. 
promiscuity, promiskiu'iti, 

prSmiskiu'iti. 

ale, senate, cdre, at, accord, Srm, ask, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, xU, old, obey, 6rb, 



promulgate, prSmul'gat. 
promulgator, pro'mulgat^r. 
pronunciamento, prDnun- 

shiamen'to, pr6nun- 

siamen'to. 
pronunciation, prSnunsia'- 

shun, prSnunshia'- 

shun. 
propagandism, prSpagan'- 

diz'm. 
propagandist, prSpagan'- 

dist. 
prophecy, pr6f'esi. 
prophesy, pr5f'esi. 
Prophete, Le, le profet'. 
prophylactic, prSfilak'tik. 
prophylaxis, pr6filak'sis. 
propinquity, prOpin'kwiti. 
pro'pria perso'na. 
propylaeum, propile'um. 
propylon, pr5p'il6n. 
pro rata, pro ra'ta. 
prorogue, pr6rog'. 
proscenium, prSse'nium. 
proselyte, pr5s'6lit. 
proselytize, pr5s'Slitiz, 

pr5s'SlItiz. 
Proserpina, pr&ser'pina. 
Proserpine, pr5s'erpin, 

pros'^rpen. 
prosodic, pr6s6d'ik. 

sofa, lovable, eve, ivent, iJnd, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lem6n, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



193 



prosodist, pr6s'6dist. 
prosody, pr5s'6di. 
Prospero, pr5s'p6ro. 
prospice, pr5s'pise. 
protagonist, pr8tag'onist. 
protasis, pr5t'asis. 
Protean, pro'tgan, prfite'- 

an. 
protege, prStaza'. 

So pronounced, also, in the 
feminine form, j/rotegie. 

proteid, pro'tSid. 
protein, pro'tSin. 
pro tempore, pro tem'pfire. 
Protesilaus, pr6tSsila'us. 
protest (verb), prStSst'; 

(subst.), pro'test. 
protestant, pr6t'estant. 
protestation, prStSsta'- 

shun. 
Proteus, pro'tius, pro'tSus. 
prothalamion, prothala'- 

mi5n. 
prothalamium, prothala'- 

mium. 
prothonotary, pr6th6n'- 

5tari. 
protocol, pro't8k51. 
protonotary, pr6t5n'StS;ri. 
protozoa, protSzo'a. 
protrude, prStrood'. 

ohr, iu=»u in use, Am, ixp, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, a^gle, paft, thin^ 
y*at, a?ure, CH=Germ. ieh, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20, 



Provengal, prSv5,nsai'. 

Provence, prftvans. 

proviso, prSvi'zo. 

provocable, pr&vo'kab^l. 

provocative, pr&v6k'ativ, 
pr8vo'kativ. 

provost, pr5v'fist; (in mili- 
tary usage commonly) 
pro'vo. 

prow, prou. 

Prudhomme, priidSm'. 

Prud'hon, prud6n'. 

Prussia, prush'i. 

prussic, prus'ik. 

Prynne (Hester), prin. 

Prytaneum, pritane'flm. 

Przemysl, psh5'mishly\ 

psalm, sam. 

psalmic, sSl'mik, sS-l'mik. 

psalmist, sam'Jst. 

psalmistry, s&m'fetri. 

psalmodist, sam'&dist, sSl'- 
m6dist. 

psalmody, samSdi, sal'- 
mSd!. 

Psalter (The), sol't^r. 

psaltery, sol't^ri. 

pseudo-, siu'dS-, psiu'd6-. 

pseudonym, siu'dSnim. 

pseudonymous, siudSn'I- 
m&s, psiudttn'imtis. 



194 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Psyche, si'ke, psi'ke. 
psychiatric, sikiat'rik, psik- 

iat'rik. 
psychiatrist, siki'atrist, 

psiki'atrist. 
psychiatry, siki'atri, psiki'- 

atri. 
psychic, si'kik. 
psychical, si'kikal. 
psychologic, sik816dz'ik. 
psychologist, sik51'odzist. 
psychology, sikor6dzi. 
psychopathy, sikop'athi, 

psikop'athi. 
psychosis, siko'sis, psiko'- 

sis. 
ptarmigan, tar'migSn. 
pterodactyl, terSdak'til, 

p^ter'odaktil. 
ptisan, tiz'an. 
Ptolemaic, t6ISma'ik. 
Ptolemais, toISma'is. 
Ptolemy, torgmi. 
ptomaine, to'man, toman', 
publicist, pub'lisist. 
Puccini, pootche'ne. 
Pucelle, La, Ik piusel'; 

(Fr.), pusgr. 
Puebla, pwa'bla. 
pueblo, pweb'Io. 
puerile, piu'eril. 

ale, senate, c^re, St, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



puerility, piueril'iti. 
puerperal, piuer'peral. 
Puerto Rico, pwer'to re'ko. 
Puget (Pierre), ptize'. 
Puget (Sound), piu'dzet. 
pugnacious, pugna'shus. 
puir (Scot.), ptir. 
puisne, piu'ni. 
puissance, piu'isans, piuis'- 

ans. 
puissant, piu'isant, piuis'- 

ant. 
pulchritude, piil'kritiud. 
Pulci, poorche. 
Pulcinella, poolcheneria. 
pulque, poorka. 
Pultowa, polta'va. 

So pronounced, also, when 
spelled Poltava. 

pumice, pum'is. 
pumpernickel, p u m ' p e r - 

nik'l, pdom'pernik'I. 
pumpkin, piim'kin, pun'- 

kin, pump'kin. 
Objections to the first two are 
pedantic. 

punitive, piu'nitiv. 
Punjab, ptodzab'. 
Purana, poora'na. 
puree, piira'. 

Purgatorio, II, el poorga- 
tor'yo. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



195 



purificative, piu'rifikStiv, 

piurif'ikativ. 
purificatory, piurif'ikatftri. 
Purim, piu'rim. 
Puritani, I, e pooret&n'e. 
puriieu, ptir'liu. 
purport, plir'port. 
purposive, p6r'p6siv. 
pursue, pfirsiu'. 
pursuit, pursiut'. 
pursuivant, pAr'swivSnt. 
purulent, piu'roolent. 
pusillanimity, piusilanim'- 

iti. 
pusillanimous, piusilan'- 

imfis. 
pustule, piis'tiul. 
put, poot; (in golf), put. 
Puteoli, piute'oli. 
puttee, put'i; (plu.), put'iz. 
In American Military par- 
lance commonly jrtitez\ 

Puvis de Chavannes, ptive'- 

deshavan'. 
Puy-de-Dome, pwededom'. 
pyaemia, pie'mia. 
Pygmalion, pigma'lion. 
pygmean, pigme'an. 



pyjama, pidzS-'ma, pidza'- 
ma. 

Now most commonly spelled 
pajama {pddzd'md). 

Pylades, pil'adez. 

pyloric, pilor'ik, pilor'ik. 

pylorus, pilo'rus. 

pyramidal, piram'idal. 

pyramidic, piramid'ik. 

pyramidical, piramid'ikal. 

pyramidize, piram'adiz. 

Pyramus, pir'amus. 

Pyrenean, pirSne'Un. 

Pyrenees, pir'Snez. 

pyrite, pi'rit, pir'it. 

pyrites, piri'tez. 

pyritic, pirit'ik. 

pyrotechnic, pirdtSk'nik, 

pir6tek'nik. 

Pyrrha, pir'a. 

Pyrrhic, pir'ik. 

Pythagoras, pithag'Sras. 

Pythagorean, pithagSre'an. 

Pythia, pith'ia. 

Pythian, pith'ian. 

Pythias, pith'ias. 

python, pi'th6n. 

pyx, piks. 



bhr, iu=u in use, Am, up, circus, menu, food, fd6t, out, oil, ai?gle, part, thin, 
that, aif ure, QU = Qeija, ich^ 6 (Fr.) morif ^e cgmplet© key, pages 15-20, 



Q 



quad, kw6d. 
quadrangle, kwSd'rang'l. 
quadriga, kw5dri'ga. 
quadrille, kwadril'. 
quadrumana, k w 6 d r oo ' - 

mana. 
quadrumanous, kw5droo'- 

manfls. 
V quadrupedal kwSdroo'- 

pedal. 
quadruple, kw5d'r6op'l. 
quaere, kwe're. 
quaestor, kwes't6r, kwes'- 

tar. 
quaff, kwaf. 
quaggy, kwag'i. 
quagmire, kw^g'mir. 
quaich (Scot.), kwaCH. 
qualm, kwam. 
qualmish, kwam'ish. 
quandary, kw5n'dS,ri. 
quand meme, kan mdm'. 
quantivalence, kw5ntiva'- 

lens, kw5ntiv'alens. 

quarantine, kw5r'anten. 

quarterfoil. 

See quatrefoil. 

ale, senlite, c&re, &t, Accord, &rm, Ssk, 
tWre, ovfcr, Ed6n, ice, ill, old, 6bey, drb, 



quash, kw6sh. 
quasi, kwa'si. 
Quasimodo, kwasimo'do. 
quassia, kw5sh'ia, kw^s'ia, 

kwash'ia. 
quaterfoil. 

See quatrefoil. 
quaternary, kwS,ter'nari. 
quaternion, kw&ter'niun. 
quatorzain, kator'zan, kat'- 

orzan. 

quatrain, kwat'ran. 

Quatre Bras, katr' bra'. 

quatrefoil, kat'erfoil. 

So pronounced, also, when 
spelled qitaterfoil; but in the 
(rare) form quarterfoil, said to 
be pronounced kwdft^rjoil- 

quattro-centro, k w a t - 

trOchen'to. 
quay, ke. 

quean (Scot.), kwen. 
quegh (Scot.), kwaCH. 
quelle sottise, kel sStez'. 
quelque chose, ksrke sh5z. 
Quentin Durward, kwen'- 

tin dtir'ward. 
quercitron, kwep'sitrfin. 

sofS, lov&ble, eve, $vent, ^nd, recint, 
coffee, odd, connect, lem6n, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



197 



Queretaro, kSra'taro. 
quern (Scot.), kwiirn, kern, 
querulous, kwer'oolus. 
Quesnel, kengl' 
queue, kiu. 
Queux, ko. 
Quiberon, keb'r6n'. 
quicunque, kwikun'kwS. 
quien sabe, kyen s§,'ba. 
quietus, kwie'tus. 
Quiller-Couch, k w i T 6 r - 

kooch'. 
quina, kwi'nS,, ke'nS. 
Quinault, keno'. 
quincunx, kwin'kunks. 
Quincy, kwin'zi, kwin'si. 

In New England it has the 
first sound almost universally 
both as a place name and as a 
family name. 

quinine, kwi'mn, kwinen'. 
quinsy, kwin'zi. 
quint, kwint, kint. 
quintessence, kwlntes'ens. 



Quintilian, kwintil'ian. 
quinze (game), kwinz; 

(Fr.), kanz. 
Quirinal (Hill), kwir'inal. 
Quirinale, Monte, mon'ta 

kwerena'la. 
Quirinalis, Mons, mSnz 

kwirina'lis. 
Quirinus, kwiri'n&s. 
quirites, kwiri'tez. 
Quito, ke'to. 
qui vive, kSvev'. 
quixotic, kwiks5t'ik. 
quixotism, kwik'sotiz'm. 
quoin, koin, kwoin. 
quoit, kwoit, koit. 

Colloquially kwdt in the United 
States. 

quorum, kwo'rum. 
quoth, kwoth. 
quotient, kwo'shent. 
quo warranto, kwo wSrSn'- 
to. 



bhr, iu = u in use, <irn, up, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, ai^gle, part, thin, 
Aat, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 1^20. 



R 



rabbi, rab'i, rab'L 
Rabelais, rabble'; (Ang.), 

rab'^a. 
Rabelaisian, rabela'zian. 
rabies, ra'biez. 
raca, ra'ka, raki'. 
Rachel, ra'chel. 
rachis, ra'kis. 
rachitis, raki'tls. 
racial, ra'shal. 
Racine, rasen'. 
raconteur, rakontor'. 
Ragnarok, rag'nar5k'. 
ragout, ragoo'. 
Rahway, ro'wa. 
raillery, rareri, ral'eri. 
Rainier (Mount), ra'ner, 

raner'. 
raison d'etre, rezon'da'tr'. 
raisonne, rezSna'. 
rajah, ra'dzS. 
Rajapur, ra'dzapoor. 
Rajput, radz'poot, r^dz- 

poot'. 
Rajputana, rMzpobWuL 
Rakoczy, ra'kotsS. 
Ramadan, ramadan'. 

ale, senate, c^re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, over, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Ramayana, rama'yana. 
Rambouillet, ranbooye'. 
ramekin, ram'Skin. 
Rameses, ram'Ssez. 
Ramillies, rameye'. 
ramose, ra'mos, ramos'. 
rampant, ram'pant. 
Rampoll^ (Cardinal), ram- 

pol'la. 
ranchero, rancha'ro. 
rancor, ran'ker. 
Ranz des Vaches, rans da 

vash', ran da vash'. 

Raphael, raf'ael, ra'fael. 

As the name of the Italian 
painter it is more often rdf'&U. 

Raphaelism, raf aeliz'm. 

Raphaelite, raf 'aelit. 

Rapidan, rapidan'. 

rapier, ra'pier. 

rapine, rap'in. 

rapport, raport'; (Fr.), ra- 

p6r'. 
rapprochement, rapr6sh-* 

m&n'. 
rarebit, rar'bit. 

More properly spelled and 
pronounced rabbit. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



199 



rarefaction, rarSfak'shun. 
rarefy, rar'Sfi. 
rarity, rar'iti. 
rasorial, raso'rial. 
raspberry, raz'berJ, raz'- 

berf. 
Rasselas, ras'elas. 
rath (Scot.), rath, 
rather, ratfe'er, ra'th^r. 
Rathskeller, rats'kSlSr. 
ratio, ra'shio, ra'sho. 
ratiocinate, rashi5s'inat. 
ratiocination, rashi5s'ina'- 

shun. 
ration, ra'shun, rSsh'fin. 

British army usage prefers the 
second. 

rational, rash'flnal. 
rationale, rashuna'le. 
ratlines, rat'linz. 
raught (Scot.), roCHt. 
ravelin, rav'lin. 
re (law), re. 
Reading, red'ing. 
real (coin), re'al; (Span.), 

raal'. 
realization, realiza'shun, 

realiza'shun. 
really, re'ali. 
rebate, rgbat'. 



rebel (verb), rebel'; (subst. 

and adj.), reb'el. 
Recamier, rakamya'. 
receptacle, rSsep'tak'l. 
recess, reses', re'ses. 
Rechab, re'kab. 
Rechabite, rek'S,bit. 
rechauffe, rashofa'. 
recherche, reshersha'. 
recipe, res'ipe. 
reciprocity, resipr5s'itL 
recitative, resitatev'. 

So pronounced as a musical 
term; in other senses (rare) 
ri^s'itdtlvj rtsit'atlv. 

recitativo, resitate'vo. 
reclamation, r S k 1 a m a ' - 

shun, 
recluse, rSkloos'. 
recognizable, rek'ogniz&b'I. 
recognizance, r5k5g'nizans, 

rekon'izans. 
Cf . reconnaissance and recon- 
noissance. 

recognizant, rSkSg'nizant, 

rSkon'izant. 
recollect, rekolekt'. 
recommendatory, reko- 

men'datSri. 
reconcentrado, r a k o n - 

sentra'do. 
reconcilable, rek'onsilab'l. 



ohr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menii, food, fdot, out, oil, aqgle, part, thin, 
that, a^ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 
14 



200 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



recondite, rgk'ondit. 
reconnaissance, r § k 5 n ' - 

asans. 
reconnoissance, r S k 6 n ' - 

isans. 
reconnoiter, rekonoi'tey. 
record (verb), rekord'; 

(subst.), rek'ord, rek'- 

ord. 
recoup, rekoop'. 
recourse, rSkors'. 
recreant, rek'rSant. 
recreate, rek'rSat. 
recreation, rekrSa'shun. 
recrudesce, rekroodes'. 
recrudescence, rekroodes'- 

ens. 
rectitude, rek'titiud. 
recubant, rek'iubant. 
recusancy, rek'iuzansi, r§- 

kiu'zansi. 
recusant, rek'iuzant. 
redemption, redemp'shun. 
redingote, red'ingot. 
redintegrate, rSdin'tggrat. 
redintegration, rgdintegra'- 

shun. 
redivivus, redivi'vus. 
redolent, red'61ent. 
referable, ref'erab^l. 

ale» senate, cllre, at, accord, Srm, ask, 
th^re, ovfcr, Eden, ice, ill, 6ld, obey, drb. 



reflex, refleks'. 

This is the adjective or the 
substantive; the verb (chiefly 
technical or obsolete) is jrefi^ks\ 

refluent, ref looent. 
reflux, re'fluks. 
refragable, ref'ragab'l. 
refuse (verb), refiuz'; (adj. 

and subst.), ref'ius. 
refutable, refiut'ab^I, ref- 

iutabl. 
regalia, rSga'lia. 
regatta, rggat'a. 
regicide, redz'isld. 
Regillus, redzil'us. 
regime, razem'. 
regimen, redz'imen. 
regina, redzi'na. 
registrar, redz'istrS.r. 
Regnault, renyo'. 
Regnier, ranya'. 
regress (subst.), re'gres; 

(verb), riSgrgs'. 
Regulus, reg'iulus. 
Rehan (Ada), re'an, ra'an. 
Rehoboth, rSho'b5th, 

rSho'bdth. 
rei (coin), ra, re. 
Reichsrath, riCHs'r3,t. 
Reichstag, riCHs'taCH. 
reif (Scot.), ref. 

sofS, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



201 



reiffar (Scot.), refer. 
Reina Mercedes, rae'na 

martha'das. 
Reine de Saba, La, la ran 

d^ sS.b3,. 
reise (Scot.), rez. 
reist (Scot.), rest. 
Rejane, mzkn\ 
relay, rSla', re'la. 
relevancy, rSI'fevansi. 
relevant, rSl'Svant. 
relict, r^I'ikt. 
Religio Medici, rglidz'io 

mSd'isi. 
reliquary, rSl'ikwiri. 
reliquiae, rSlik'wie. 
remarque, r§m§.rk'. 
Rembrandt, rem'br^nt. 
remediable, rSme'diS.b'1. 
Remusat, de, d^ ramiiza.' 
remuve (Scot.), rgmiiv'. 
renaissance, renesS,ns', 

rSna'sans; (Fr.), rene- 



Renan, r^nM'; (Ang.), rg- 

nan'. 
renascence, rSnas'ens. 
renascent, rSnas'ent. 
Renaud, reno'. 
Renault, reno'. 



rencontre, renkSn't^r; 

(Fr.), rankon'tr'. 
rendez-vous, r 3, n ' d e v oo , 
r5n'devoo, ren'devoo. 
renege, rSneg'. 

So pronounced, also, when 
spelled renegue. 

renew, rSniu'. 

Rensselaer, ren's^lej*. 

rentes, rant. 

rentier, rantya'. 

renunciation, r S n ii n s i a'- 
shfin. 

reparable, rgp'&r&b'l. 

reparative, rgpar'ativ. 

repertoire, rSp'^rtwir. 

repertory, rep'ertSrJ. 

repetitive, rSpet'itiv. 

replevin, r§pl5v'in. 

replica, rgp'lik^. 

rep6rt6'rial, rep6rt6'rial. 

repository, rSp5z'it8ri. 

repousse, rSpoosa'. 

Repplier (Agnes), rep'ler. 

reprimand (subst.), rep'- 
rimand; (verb), repri- 
mand'. 

reptile, rep'til, rSp'til. 

repugn, rSpiun'. 

reputable, rgp'iutabi. 



oAr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circils, menu, food, foot, out, oU, apgle, part, thin, 
^at, a^ure, CH = Germ. »cA, 6 (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



202 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



requiem, re'kwiem, rek'- 

wiem. 
requisite, rek'wizit. 
requital, rekwit'al. 
reredos, rer'dos. 
rescission, resiz'un. 
research, rSserch'. 
reservoir, rez'ervwor, rez'- 

ervwar. 
residue, rez'idiu. 
residuum, rSzid'iufim. 
resilience rSzil'iens. 
resin, rez'in. 

Cf. rosin, 
resoluble, rez'SIiub'I. 
resolute, rez'oliut. 
resonance, rez'Onans. 
resource, rSsors'. 
respirable, rSspir'ab'l, res'- 

piraba. 

respirator, res'pirater. 
respiratory, r§spir'gLt6ri, 

res'pirat6ri. 
respite, res'pit. 
restaurant, res't8rant, res'- 

t6rant. 
restaurateur, restorator'. 
Restigouche, restigoosh'. 
restorative, restor'ativ. 
restrick (Scot.), rSstrSk'. 
resumable, rezium'ab'l. 

ale, senilte, cfire, at, accord, Srm, ask, 
tlifre, pyer, Jid?^, ice, 3(11, 9I4, pbej^, Orb, 



resume, rSzium'. 

Reszke, resh'ke. 

retail, rStal', re'tal. 

The first is commonly the 
verb; the second, the adjective 
and substantive. 

retailer, rfetal'er, re'taler. 

retardation, retarda'shun 

retro- 

''The pronunciation of retro- 
is to some extent unsettled, and 
lexicographers vary in their rec- 
ognition of, or preference for, the 
short or long vowel. . . . Recent 
dictionaries which attempt to 
discriminate between the vari- 
ous words usually favor retro- 
except in retrograde and retro- 
spect.'^ — Oxford Dictionary. 

retrousse, retroosa'. 
Reunion (Island), reiun'- 

yun; (Fr.), raiinyon'. 
reveille, rSvarya; (in U. S. 

service), revele' or 

rev'ele; (in Brit.), rg- 

vel'i or r^vari. 
revenons a nos moutons, 

rev'n6n'zanomoot6n'. 
revenue, rev'Sniu. 
reverable, rever'ab'l. 
reverie, rev'eri. 
reversion, rSv^r'shfin. 
revery, rev'eri. 
revocable, rev'6kSb'l. 

sofS, lovable, eve, event, Snd, recent, 
cpffee, p44j connect, lenion, o (Gej-ja.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



203 



revocatory, rev'SkatSri. 
revolt, revolt', r5v61t'. 
Revue des Deux Mondes, 

r^vti da do mond. 
Reyes, ra'yas. 
Reykjavik, ra'kyavek. 
Reynaldo, ranal'do. 
reynard, ra'nard, ren'ard. 
rez de chaussee, ra de 

shosa'. 
Rhadamanthus, radaman'- 

thus. 
Rhsetian, re'shan. 
rhapsodist, rap's6dist. 
rhapsodize, r^p'sOdiz. 
rhapsody, rap'sOdi. 
Rhea Sylvia, re'a sir\aa. 
Rheims (Aug.), remz; 

(Fr.), rans. 
Rheingold, Das, das rin'- 

g61t; (Ang.), rin'gold. 
Rhemish, re'mish. 
Rhenish, ren'ish. 
rheum, room, 
rheumatic, roomat'ik. 
rheumatism, rdo'matJz^m. 
Rhodes, rodz. 
Rhodesia, rOdezia. 
rhododendron, rod6den'- 

dron. 
rhomb, r5mb, r6m. 



rhumb, rum, rurnb. 
Rhys, res. 

rhythm, rife'm, rith'm. 
rhythmic, rith'mik, rith'- 

mik. 
Rialto, rSarto, rial'to. 
riant, ri'ant; (Fr.), rean'. 
ribald, rib'ald. 
riband, rib'and. 
An archaic form of ribbon, 

Ribault, rebo'. 
Ribera, Jose, h&sa' rgba'rS;. 
Ribot, reb6'. 
Richelieu, resh^lyo'. 
Richepin, reshpan'. 
richt (Scot.), reCHt. 
Richter, riCH'ter. 
rickle (Scot.), rek'^I. 
ricochet, rik6sha', riko- 

shet'. 
rief (Scot.), ref. 
riever (Scot.), rev'er. 
rifacimento, refachemen'to. 
Riga, re'ga. 
Rigel, r 'dzel, ri'gel. 
Rigi-Kulm, re'gS-kooIm. 
Rigoletto, rigOlet'to. 
rigor, rig'er. 
Rigsdag, rigz'dag. 
Riis (Jacob A.), res. 
Rijks (Museum), riks. 



bhr, iu=u in use, Arn, iip, circus, menii, food, idot, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



204 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Rijswijk, ris'wik. 

Riks'dag. 

rilievo, rSlya'vo. 

rime, rim. 

Rinaldo, rtnkVdQ. 

rind, rind. 

rinderpest, rin'derpest. 

Ring des Nibelungen, Der, 

der rin des ne'beloonen. 
rinthereout (Scot.), ren'- 

tfeeroot. 
Rio de Janeiro, re'o da 



Rio de la Plata, re'o da 

la plS^'ta. 
Rio Grande, re'o gr^n'da. 
Riordan (Archbishop), rer'- 

dan 

rip (Scot.), rep. 

Ripon, rip'on. 

riposte, rgpost'. 

ripple (Scot.), rep"l. 

rise, riz. 

The pronunciation ns for the 
substantive lingers in American 
dictionaries; it is obsolete in 
British usage. 

risk (Scot.), resk. 

risque, reska'. 

rit (Scot.), ret. 

rivage, riv S.dz. 

Rivarol, rev3.r61'. 

ale, senate, ckre, at, accord, 5rm, ask, 
thSre, ov^r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Riviera di Levante, rSvyd'- 

ra de lavan'ta. 
Rivoli, Rue de, rli dS 

re'v61e'. 
Rizzio, ret'sSo. 
Roanoke, ro'anok. 
Robbia, della, del'la r6b'- 

bya. 
Robert le Diable, rObar' le 

dya'br. 
Robespierre, rSbespyar'; 

(Ang.), ro'besper. 
Robsart, Amy, a'mi r5b'- 

sart. 
robust, rSbust'. 
robustious, rObus'chfis. 
Rochambeau, de, d6 rSsh- 

anbo'. 
Rochefort, rSshfSr'. 
Rockingham, r5k'inham, 

rSk'inam. 
rococo, rSko'ko. 
Rod, Edouard, adoowar' 

rod. 
Roderick, rod'^rik. 
Roderigo, r5d6re'go, rodS- 

re'go. 
Rodin, rSdan'. 
rodomontade, r5d6m6n- 

tad', r6d8m5ntad'. 
Rodriguez, rSdre'gas. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



205 



Y^ 



Roget, rSza'. 

Roi d'Yvetot, Le, le rwi 

devto'. 
roil, roil. 
Rokeby, rok'bi. 
Roland, ro'land. 
role, rOl. 

romance, rOmans'. 
Roman de la Rose, r8man 

de la r6z'. 
Romanov, r6ma'n8£ 
Romany, rom'ani. 
romanza, r6man'za. 
Romeo et Juliette, rSmao 

a ziileet'. 
Romilly, r5m'ili. 
Romola, r5m'61a, ro'mola. 
Roncesvalles, ronsSvares ; 

(Span.) , rdnthesval'- 

yas. 
rondeau, r5n'do, rSndo'. 
rondo, r5n'do. 
Rontgen, ront'gen, rent'- 

gen. 
ronyon, riin'yfin. 
room, room. 
Roosevelt, ro'zVelt. 
root, root. 
Roquefort, rOkfor'. 
roquelaure, rdk'elor, rok- 

lor'. 

ohr, iu = u in use, dm, iip, circus, menii, food, f66t, out, oil, aijgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



Rosa, Salvator, sklvk'ttv 
ro'za. 

Rosalind, rSz'lLlind. 

But Shakespeare makes the 
i long: 

"All the pictures fairest lined 
Are but black to Rosalind." 

Rosaline, r5z'Slin, rSz'alin. 
Roscius, rbsh'ius. 
Roscommon (Earl), r6s- 

k5m'&n. 
Rosebery (Lord), roz'bgri. 
rosemary, roz'mSri. 
Rosencrantz, ro'zenkrants; 

(Ang., in Hamlet), ro'- 

zenkrSnts. 
Rosicrucian, rozikroo'shan, 

r6zikroo'sh&n. 
Rosicrucius, rdsikroo'shitls. 
rosin, rSz'in. 

Cf. resin. 
Rosinante, rSzinSn'tS. 
Rosny, de, de r&ne'. 
Rospigliosi, rSspelyo'se. 
Rossetti, r6set'§. 
rossignol, r6senyol'. 
Rossini, rftsse'ne. 
Rostand (Edmond), r8s- 

tan'. 

rotate, r5'tat, rotat'. 

British usage recognizes only 
the second. 



206 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Rotherhithe, rSth'erhitfe. 

Said on American authority 
to be colloquially rdd'rtthy or 
rM'rifj but Jones recognizes 
neither. 

Rothesay, r6th'si. 

Rothschild, roths'child, 

rSs'child. 

roturier, rSttirya'. 

roue, rooa'. 

Rouen, rwM. 

rouge, rooz. 

rouge et noir, rooz a nwar'. 

roulade, roolad'. 

rouleau, roolo'. 

Roulers, roola'. 

roulette, roolSt'. 

roun (Scot.), roon. 

Rousillon, rooseyon'. 

rousted (Scot.), roost'it. 

rout, rout. 

route, root. 

routh (Scot.), rooth. 

routine, rooten'. 

Roux, roo. 



rowan (tree), ro'an, rou'an. 
rowel, rou'el. 
Rowena, rOe'na. 
Rowland, ro'land. 
Roxana, roksan'a, r5ksa'- 

na. 
Rubaiyat, roo'biyat'. 
ruble, roo'b^I. 
Rucel'ai, roochel'li. 
rude, rood. 

rudiment, roo'diment. 
Rue de la Paix, rii de la 

pa'. 
Rue St. Honore, rii san- 

tonora'. 



rupee, roope'. 



rus 



riiz d6 



de guerre, 

Rustam, rus'tum. 
rutabaga, rootaba'ga. 
Ruy Bias, rwe bias'. 
Ruy Lopez, roo'e lo'pez; 

(Span.), rwe lo'path. 
Ruysdael, rois'dal. 



file, senate, cfire, St, accord, arm, Ssk, sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
there, ov6r, Ed6n, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, cSffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



Saadi, s3,de', sode'. 
Saavedra, saava'thrS,. 
Sabacthani, sabaktha'ne. 
Sabaoth, sab'SSth, saba'- 

oth. 
sabot, sabo'. 
sabretasch, sa'bertSsh. 
Sabrina, sS,bri'n4. 
saccharine, s^k'arin, s^k'- 

Srin. 
sacerdotal, saserdo'tal. 
sachem, sa'chem. 
sachet, sasha'. 
Saco, so'ko. 
sacrament, sSk'rament. 
sacrificable, s&krif'ikab'l. 
sacrifice, sak'rifis, sak'riflz. 
The first is now preferred in 
both American and British usage. 

sacrilege, sak'rilSdz. 
sacrilegious, s^krglidz'us, 
s^kriledz'us. 
The second is still the favorite 
of the lexicographers, but they 
are beginning to recognize the 
fact that no one uses it. 

sacrosanct, s3,k'r6sankt. 
Sadducean, s^diuse'an. 



Sadducee, s^d'iuse. 
Sadowa, sa'dOvS-. 
Saengerbund, zeng'erboont. 
Saengeri'est, zeng'^rfest. 
saga, sa'gS,, sa'gS. 
sagacious, s5,ga'shus. 
sagamore, s&g'Smor. 
Saginaw, sag'in6. 
sagittal, s^dz'itdl. 
Sagittarius, sadzita'rius. 
Saguenay, s^gena'. 
Sahara, saha'ra. 
Saint Albans, sS,nt 61'bSnz. 
Saint Augustine, sS,nt 6'- 
gusten. 
British usage favors dgus'tln 
as the name of the Church 
Father. 

Saint Bernard, sant b^r'- 
nard, b^rnard'; (Fr.), 
sari bernar'. 

Saint Cloud, san kloo'. 

Saint-Croix, sant kroi'; 
(Fr.), sM krw§,'. 

Saint-Denis, san d6ne^ 

Sainte-Beuve, sSnt-bov'. 



bhr, iu=u in use, Am, up, circus, menii, food, fd6t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ. ic/i, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



208 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Saint Gaudens (Augustus), 

sS-nt go'denz. 
Saint-Germain, san zdr- 

man'. 
Saint Gothard, sant g5th'- 

iLrd; (Fr.), san gotar'. 
Saint Helena (island), sant 

hele'na. 
Ordinarily the name is pro- 
nounced MV^nd. 

Saint-Hilaire, sSn telar'. 
Saint John, sant dz6n'. 

As a British surname, St. John 
is usually sln'dfn; as a place 
name, s^nd^n\ 

Saint Julien, san ziilyan'. 
St. Leger, sant-ledz'er, sil'- 

ind?6r. 
St. Louis (Missouri), sSnt 

loo'is, loo'i. 
Saint Lucia, sant liu'shia. 
Cf. Santa Lucia. 

Saint Martin (Fr.), san 

m&rtan'. 
Saint Michael (Mount), 

sant mi'kel. 
Saint-Michel, Mont, moii 

sM meshel'. 
St. Mihiel, san meyel'. 
St. Quentin, sSn kintan'. 
Saint-Saens, sM-sMs'. 



Saint-Simon, de, de san 
semon'; (Aug.), sant 
si'mon. 

Sais, sa'is. 

The name appears without the 

diaeresis, pronounced sds, 

Sakhalin, saCHalyen'. 
Sakuntala, sakoon'talS, 

shakoon'tala. 
Sala (George Augustus), 

sa'la. 
Salamis (Battle of), sal'- 

S-mis. 
Salammbo, s5,lambo'. 
saleratus, salSra'tus. 
Salic, sai'ik. 
salicylate, sarisiMt, salisil'- 

at, salis'ilat. 
American authorities frown on 
the third, which is the only one 
recognized by British usage. 

salicylic, salisil'ik. 
salient, sa'lient. 
saline, sa'lin. 
Salisbury, solz'bSri. 
sail (Scot.), sal. 
salmi, sal'mi. 
salmon, sam'un 
Salome, sSlo'mS. 
salon, salon'. 
Salonica, salSne'ka. 
Saloniki, salone'ke. 

ale, senate, cSre, at, accord, arm, ask, sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
there, ovdr, Eden, ice, 3(11, old, obey, 6rb, cSfifee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



209 



salsify, sal'sifi. 

salute, saliut'. 

salve, sav', salv. 

It has the second sound only 
as the verbal back-formation 
from salvage. 

salver (tray), sal'ver. 

Salvini, salve'ne. 

Samarkand, samarkant'. 

Sambre, san'br'. 

samite, sa'mlt. 

Samoset, sam'Sset, sam5s'- 

et. 
Samothrace, sam'6thras. 
samovar, sam'6var. 
samphire, sam'fir. 
Samson et Dalila, s3,ns6n a 

dalela^ 
samurai, sa'moori. 
Sancho Panza, san'ko 

pan'za; (Sp.), san'cho 

p§,n'tha. 
San Cristobal, san kresto'- 

bal. 
Sand, George, zorz sand. 
Sandringham, san'drinam. 
Sandusky, sandus'ki. 
Sandys, sandz. 
sang-froid, san frw3,'. 
Sangreal, san'grgal. 
sanguine, san'gwin. 



Sanhedrim, san'h^drim. 

San Jacinto, san dzasin'to. 

San Joaquin, san waken'. 

San Jose, san hOsa'. 

San Juan, san hwan'. 

San Luis Potosi, san looes' 
potOse'. 

San Martin, san marten'. 

San Michele, san mfeka'la. 

San Miguel, san mggel'. 

San Remo, san re'mo. 

San Roque, san ro'ka. 

San Salvador, san Salva- 
dor'. 

sans, sanz; (Fr.), san. 

sans-culotte, sanzkiul6t' ; 
(Fr.), sanktilot'. 

sans gene, san zan'. 
So pronounced in the title 

Madame Sans Gene, 

Sanson, Sanson'. 

Sans peur et sans reproche, 

san por' a san reprOsh'. 
sans souci, san soose'. 
Santa Anna, de, da san'ti 

a'na. 
Santa Croce, san'ta cro'- 

cha. 
Santa Cruz, san't3, kroos'. 
Santa Fe, san'ta fa. 

ohr, iu=u in use, Arn, up, circus, menu, food, foot, out, oil, aijgle, part, thin, 
tfeat, a?ure, CH = Germ. icA, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



210 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Santa Lucia, san't^ loose's ; 

(It.), looche'a. 
Santiago, santSa'go. 
Santillana, de, da sSntelya'- 

na. 
Santos-Dumont, s 5; n 1 6 s ' 

diimon'. 
Saone, son. 
sapience, sa'piens. 
saponaceous, sapSna'shfis. 
saponin, sap'onin. 
Sa'por. 

Sapphic, saf'ik. 
sapphire, saf'ir. 
sapsago, sap'sago. 
Sarajevo, sa'rayavft. 
Sarasate, de, da sarasa'ta. 
sarcenet, sars'n^t. 
sarcoma, sarko'ma. 
sarcophagi, sarkof'adzi. 
sarcophagus, sark6f'agus. 
Sardanapalus, sardanapa'- 

Ifis. 
sardonyx, sar'doniks, sar- 

don'iks. 
Sardou, Victorien, vektSr- 

eSn' s3>rdoo'. 
sargasso, s&rgas'o. 
sarsaparilla, sS^rsap^LrA'a. 
Sarta'ris. 

ale, senate, c^re, St, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ovdr, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Saskatchewan, saskach'- 

Sw6n. 
sate (preterit of sit), sat, 

sat. 
satiety, sltti'St!. 
satire, sat'ir. 
satiric, satir'ik. 
satirical, satir'ikal. 
satirist, sat'irist, sat'erfet. 
satirize, sat'iriz, sat'eriz. 
satrap, sa'trap, sat'rap. 
satrapy, sa'trapi, sat'rap!. 
Satsuma, satsoo'mS, s^t'- 

soomS;. 
Saturnalia, satfirna'liS. 
saturnine, sSt'firnin. 
satyr, sSt'er, sa'ter. 
satyriasis, sStiri'asis. 
satyric, satir'ik. 
sauce, SOS. 
sauch (Scot.), souCH, 

saCH, soCH. 
sauer-kraut, sour'krout. 
Sault, soo. 
Sault Sainte Marie, soo 

sSnt ma'ri, so sant 

mare', 
saumont (Scot.), s6'mfint. 
saunter, san't^r, s6n't^r. 
saurless (Scot.), sor'les. 
saut (Scot.), sot. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, 8nd, recent, 
cofifee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



211 



saute, sota'. 

sauve qui peut, sov ke po. 

savage, sav'Sdz. 

savagery, sav'S,dzri. 

savant, savan'. 

Savary, savare'. 

Savoie, savwa'. 

savoir-faire, savwar' fdr. 

savoir-vivre, savwar ve'vr'. 

Savonarola, savSnaro'la. 

Savoy, savoi'. 

sawt (Scot.), s6t. 

says, sez. 

'sblood, z'blud. 

scabies, ska'biez, 

Scaean, se'an. 

Scaevola, Mutius, miush'- 

ius sev'SlS. 
scaff (Scot.), skaf. 
scaglia, skal'ya. 
scagliola, sk^Iyo'15,. 
Scalchi, skal'ke. 
scald (poet), skold, sk5,ld. 
scalene, skalen'. 
Scaliger, skal'idz^r. 
scallop, skol'up, sk^rfip. 
scalpel, sk^l'pel. 
Scamander, sk&man'der. 
Scapin, skapan'. 
scarab, skar'ab. 
scarabseus, skarabe'fls. 



scarabee, skar'llbe. 
Scaramouch, skar'amouch. 
Scarron, skaroii'. 
scath, skath. 
scathe, skath. 
scathing, skath'ing. 
scaur (Scot.), skor. 
scenario, shana'rio. 

So in all dictionaries, but now, 
through the influence of the 
moving pictures, pretty well 
naturalized as sena'rio. 

scenic, se'nik, sen'ik. 
scenical, sen'ikal, se'nikal. 
scepter, sep'ter. 
sceptic, skep'tik. 
Schamhorst, sharn'h6rst. 
schedule, sked'iul. 

Jones gives shM'iul as repre- 
senting British usage. 

Scheherazade, shSherezS'- 
de, shShSrazad'. 

Scheldt, skelt. 

schelm (Scot.), shelm. 

schema, ske'mlL. 

Schenectady, skenek'tacH. 

scherzando, skerts^n'do. 

scherzo, skSr'tso. 

Scheveningen, s C H a ' - 
veningen. 

Schiaparelli, skyS,p3.rel'le. 

Schiedam, sCHedim'. 



6Ar, iu = u in use, Am, iip, circus, menQ, food, fd6t, out, oil, ai^tgle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CI|r=Gerin, ioh^ 6 (Fr.) man. See complete key, pages 15'20« 



212 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



schipperke, skip'erke. 

schism, siz'm. 

schisma, skiz'ma, skis'ma. 

schismatic, sizmat'ik. 

schist, shist. 

Schlegel, von, f6n shla'gel. 

Schleiermacher, s h 1 i ' e r - 

maCHer. 
Schleswig-Holstein, shlas'- 

viCH-hol'shtin; 

(Ang.) , sles' wik-hol'- 

stin. 
Schley (Admiral), sli. 
Schliemann, shle'mS,n. 
schloss, shlSs. 
schnapps, shnaps. 
Schoharie, sh&har'i. 
scholiast, sko'liast. 
Schonberg-Cotta, schon'- 

berCH-kSt'a. 
Schonbrunn, shon-broon'. 
Schopenhauer, s h o ' p e n - 

houer. 
schottische, shot'ish. 
Schouler (James), skoo'ler. 
Schreiner (Olive), shri'ner. 
Schroder, shro'der. 
Schubert, shoo'bert. 
schule (Scot.), shool. 
Schumann, shoo'man. 

&le, senate, cSre, at, accord, Srm, ask, 
there, ovdr, Eden, Ice, HI, old, obey, drb, 



Schumann Heink, shoo'- 

man-hink'. 
Schurz, Carl, shoorts. 
schiitzenfest, shtlt'senfest. 
Schuyler, ski'ler. 
Schuylkill, skool'ldl. 
Schwab (Charles M.), 

shwab. 
Schwarz, shvarts. 
sciatica, siat'ika. 
scilicet, sil'iset. 
Scilly (Islands), sil'i. 
scimitar, gim'iter. 
Scinde, sind. 

Variously spelled Sind, Sinde, 
Sindh, but pronounced as here 
indicated. 

scintilla, sintil'a. 

scintillate, sin'tilat. 

sciolist, si'61ist. 

scion, si'un. 

scire facias, si're fa'shias. 

scirrhous, skir'fis. 

scirrhus, skir'fis. 

Note that cirrus {sir'Hs) is an 
altogether different word. 

scission, siz'un, sish'fin. 
Scituate, sit'iuat. 
sclaff (Scot.), sklaf. 
Sclav, sklav. 

Now most commonly Slav. 

sofa, lovable, eve, Svent, Snd, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lem6n, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



213 



Sclavic, skl^v'ik. 

Now usually Slavic. 
sclerotic, sklSrot'ik. 
scone, skon, sk6n. 
Scone, skon, skoon. 
scorbutic, skorbiu'tik. 
Scotti, skSt'i. 
scour (Scot.), skoor. 
scouth (Scot.), skooth. 
scouther (Scot.), skoutfe'er, 

skootb'er. 
scowder (Scot.), skoud'er, 

skood'^r. 
scraich (Scot.), skraCH. 
scraugh (Scot.), skraCH. 
screigh (Scot.), skreCH. 
scrieve (Scot.), skrev. 
scrouge, skroudz, skroodz. 
Scudery, de, de sktidare'. 
Scutari, skoo'tare. 
Scylla, sil'a. 
'sdeath, z'deth, 
sealch (Scot.), selCH. 
seamstress, sem'stres. 
seance, sa'ans, saans'. 
seannachie (Scot.), sen'- 

aCHi. 
Seattle, sSat'a. 
Sebastopol, s5bas't8pSl. 
seckel, sek'^l. 
seclude, seklood'. 



secretary, sek'rgtari. 
secretory, sSkre'tOri. 
sedan, sSdan'. 
Sedan (Battle of), sSd^n'; 

(Fr.), sMM'. 
sedile, sSdi'le. 
sedlitz, sed'lits. 
seer, ser, se'^r. 

Commonly the first as mean- 
ing a prophet; the second, 
one who sees; but both the senses 
and the sounds are closely allied. 

seid, sa'id. 

More properly sdy^yld. 

Seidl, Anton, an'ton zi'd'l. 

seidlitz (powder), sed'lits. 

seigneur, senyor'. 

seignior, sen'y^r. 

seil (Scot.), sil. 

Seine (river), sdn, san. 

seip (Scot.), Sep. 

seismic, sis'mik, siz'rfiik. 

seizin, se'zin. 

seizor (law), se'zer, sez'zor. 

Sejanus, sedza'nus. 

selah, se'la. 

selch (Scot.), selCH. 

selenium, sele'ni&m. 

Seleucidse, seliu'side. 

Less commonly Seleucids 
{sUiu'Ms), 

Selim, se'lim, sel'im, selem'. 



bhr, iu=u in use, Arn, up, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, a^gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Gerin. icA, n (Fr.) man. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



214 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Seltzer (water), selt'ser. 

semaphore, sem'afor. 

Sembrich, zem'briCH. 

Semele, sem'fele. 

semester, sSmes't^r. 

semi, sem'i. 

sem'inar, semin&r'. 

The first is frowned upon by 
lexicographers, but in the United 
States it is the only pronuncia- 
tion heard in academic circles 
where the word is current. 
British usage favors the second. 

Semiramide, samSrame'da, 

samera'meda. 
Semiramis, semir'amis. 
Semite, sem'it. 
Semitic, semit'ik. 
sem'per e'adem. 
sempstress, semp'strgs, 

sem'stres. 
Seneca, sen'Ska. 
Senegal, senSgol'. 
senescence, sSnes'ens. 
seneschal, sen'eshal. 
senhor, sanyor'. 
senhora, sanyo'ra. 
senile, se'nil, sen'il. 
senior, sen'yer. 
Sennacherib, senak'erib. 
sennight, sen'it, sen'it. 
senor, sanyor'. 

ale, senllte, cfire, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ioe, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



senora, sanyo'ra. 
senorita, sany8re'ta. 
sentient, sen'shient, s8n'- 

shent. 
sepal, se'pal, sep'al. 
separable, sep'ar&b'l. 
septaemia, septe'miS,. 
septemvir, septem'ver. 
septemvirate, septem'virSt. 
septemviri, septem'viri. 
septicaemia, septise'mia. 
septuagenarian, septiuS- 

dzSna'rian. 
septuagenary, septiuadz'- 

Snari. 

In British usage, s^ptiuod:^'- 
ndri, 

Septuagint, sep'tiuadzint. 
sepulcher, sep'ulker. 
sepulture, sep'ultiur. 
sequelae, sSkwe'le. 
sequestrate, sSkwes'trat. 
sequestrator, se'kwestrater, 

sek'westrater. 
sequin (coin), se'kwin, sek'- 

in. 
sequitur, sek'witer. 
Sequoia, sSkwoi'a. 
seraglio, seral'yo, serM'yo. 
seraph, ser'af. 
seraphic, sSraf ik. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



215 



seraphim, ser'aflm. 
Serapis, sSra'pis. 
sergeant, sar'dzent. 
Seringapatam, seringapa- 

tam'. 
serpentine, ser'pentin, ser'- 

pSntln. 
Servetus, s^rve'tus. 
servile, ser'vil. 
servitude, ser'vitiud. 
sesame, ses'amS. 
Sesostris, ses5s'tris. 
sesquipedal, seskwip'edal, 

sSskwipe'dal. 
sesquipidalian, seskwipS- 

dal'ian. 
sessile, sSs'fl. 
sesterce, sSs't^rs. 
sesterces, sester'sez. 
Sevastopol, sevas't6p51 ; 

(Russ.), syevasto'- 

p6l-y'. 

Cf. Sebastopol. 
sevennight, sen'it, sen'it, 

sSv''n-nit. 
Sevenis, sfeve'rfis. 
S6vigne, de, de savenya'. 
Sevilla, saverya. 
Seville, sev'il, sevil'. 

Commonly the first as the 
Anglicized name of the Spanish 
city. 



Sfevres, sfi.'vr'. 
sew, so. 

sewage, siu'adz. 
sewer (drain), siu'er. 

As meaning one who sewsj the 
word is of course so'er. 

sexagenarian, seksadzSna'- 

rian. 
sexual, sSk'shiual. 
sey (Scot.), si. 
Sezanne, sazan'. 
sforzando, sfortsS-n'do. 
sforzato, sfortsa'to. 
shachle (Scot.), shaCH'^l. 
Shadrach, sha'drak. 
Shah Jehan, sha'dzShan', 
yehan'. 
Also written Jahan (d?dhdn\ 
yahdn'), 

shaird (Scot.), shard, 
shaim (Scot.), sham. 
Shakespeareana, s h a k - 

sperSa'na, shak- 

spergan'a. 
shako, shak'o. 
shallot, shal5t'. 
Shalott, shal5t'. 
shanghai, shanghi'. 
Shanghai, shangha'i. 
Shauchle (Scot.), shaCH^'l, 

sh6CH'a. 



bhr, iu«u in use, Aril, tip, circus, menii, fcx)d, foot, out, oil, aij^gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, h (Fr.) m(yn. See complete key, pages 15-20. 

15. 



216 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



shaughran, shoCH'ran. 
Shawangunk (Mountains), 

shon'gum. 
shealing (Scot.), shel'in. 
sheath, sheth. 
sheathe, sheth. 
Sheboygan, sheboi'gan. 
Shechem, she'kem. 
sheik, shek, shak. 
Sheila, shel'a. 
shekel, shek'^. 
shekinah, shSki'na. 
shellac, shelak', shel'ak. 
Sheol, she'ol. 
Sheraton, sher'atSn. 
sherbet, sher'bet. 
shereef, sheref. 
sheriat, shere'at. 
sheriff (coin), sheref . 
sheugh (Scot.), shiuCH. 
sheuk (Scot.), shtlk. 
shew, sho. 
Shiah, she'a. 
shibboleth, shib'oleth. 
shiel (Scot.), shel. 
shill (Scot.), shel. 
shillalah, shila'la. 
Shiloh, shi'lo. 
shilpit (Scot.), shel'pit. 
Shinar shi'nar. 

ale, senite, c&re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
thSre, oyfir, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



shire, shir. 

As a suffix the" syllable has 
in England the sound she^, or 
she. 

shog (Scot.), shog. 
shogun, sho'goon. 
shone, shon, sh6n. 
Shoshone, sh6sho'n§. 
shough, shok, shooCH. 

The j&rst as a kind of dog; 
the second, a trench or furrow 
(variant of sheugh), 

shrew, shroo. 
shrewd, shrood. 
Shrewsbury (England) , 

shrooz'beri, shroz'- 

bM. 
shriegh (Scot.), shreCH. 
shrievalty, shrev'alti. 
Shropshire, shrop'sher. 
shumac, siu'mak, shoo'- 

mak. 
Siam, si^m', seam'. 
Siamese, siamez', siames'. 
Siasconset, siask6n's6t, 

skSn'set. 
sibb (Scot.), seb. 
Siboney, sebona'. 
sibyl, sib'il. 

sibylline, sibllin, sib'ilm. 
sic (Scot.), sek. 
siccar (Scot.), sek'^r. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, JJnd, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



217 



sice, sis, siz. 

Sichseus, sike'us. 

sicht (Scot.), seCHt. 

Sicilian, sisil'ian, sisil'yan. 

sicker (Scot.), sek'er. 

siclike (Scot.), sek'lik. 

Siddharta, sedS-r'ta. 

Also written Siddhartha {sMd- 
arVhd), 

sideral, sid'^ral. 
sidereal, side'rgal. 
Sidon, si'don. 
Siegfried, seg'fred; (Ger.), 

zeCH'fret. 
Sienkiewicz, shenkya'vich. 
Sierra Leone, sier'a ISo'ng. 
Sierra Madre, sier'a ma'- 

dra. 
Sierra Nevada, sier'a nSv^'- 

da. 
siesta, sies'ta. 
Sieyes, syayes'. 
Sigismonda, sidzism5n'da. 
Sigismund, sidz'ismund; 

(Ger.), ze'gismoont. 
signior, sen'y^r. 
signiory, sen'yeri. 
signer, se'nySr. 
signora, sSnyo'ra. 
signore, sSnyo'ra. 
signori, sSnyo're. 



signorina, senySre'nS,. 
signorine, seny6re'iia. 
signorini, seny6re'ne. 
sike (Scot.), sik. 
Sikh, sek. 
Silenus, sile'nfls. 
silesia, sile'shia, sile'shSL. 
silhouette, silooet'. 
siliceous, silish'us. 
silicic, silis'ik. 
siller (Scot.), ser^r. 
sillock (Scot.), sel'uk. 
silo, si'lo. 
Siloam, silo'am. 
Silvanus, silva'nfls. 
Simeon Stylites, sim'feon 

stilftez. 
simile, sim'ile. 
simitar, sim'iter. 
Simois, sim'Ois. 
simonist, s m'Onist. 
simony, sim'8iii. 
simoom, simoom'. 
Simplon, sim'plSn; (Fr.), 

sanpl6fi'. 
simultaneous, simfilta'- 

ngfis, simulta'neus 
sin (Scot.), sen. 
Sinai (Mount), si'ni, si'nai. 
Sinaitic, sinait'ik. 
sinapis, sina^'pis. 



bhr, iu = u in use, <irn, iip, circiis, menii, food, f66t, out, oil, ai^gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH ^ Gerpa. wK n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



218 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



sind (Scot.), smd, sen, sin. 

Sindhi, sm'de. 

sindry (Scot.), sen'ri, sen'- 

dri. 
sine (trigonometry), sin. 
sinecure, si'nSkiur. 
sine die, si'ne di'e. 
sine qua non, si'ne kwa 

non. 
sinew, sin'iu. 
sing (Scot.), sendz. 
Singapore, singapor'. 
Singhalese, singalez', singa- 

les'. 
single (Scot.), sen'g'I. 
sinister, sin'ister. 
Sinope, sino'pfe. 
sinsyne (Scot.), sen'sin. 
sinus, si'nus. 
Sion, si'on. 
Sioux, soo. 
siphon, si'fon. 
Sirius, sir'ius. 
sirocco, sir6k'o. 
sirrah, sir'a. 
Sisera, sis'era. 
Sismondi, de, de sism5n'di, 

de sesmonde'. 
Sistine (Chapel), sis'ten, 

sis'tJn. 
Sisyphus, sis'ifus. 

ale, senate, c^re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov6r, iEden, ice, ill, pld, obey, 6rb 



sith (Scot.), seth. 
Siva, se'va, she'va. 
Sixtine (Chapel), siks'tin. 
sizar, siz'er. 
Skager-Rak, sgag'er-rak, 

skager-rak', 
skat, skat. 

skeigh (Scot.), skeCH. 
skein, skan. 

skelloch (Scot.), skel'uCH. 
skeptic, skep'tik. 
ski, ske, she. 
skiagraph, ski'agraf. 
skilly (Scot.), skgl'i. 
skink (Scot.), skenk. 
skinker (Scot.), skenk'er. 
skirret, skir'et, skir'it. 
skyre (Scot.), skir. 
skyt (Scot.), skit, 
slake, slak. 
Slav, slS,v, Slav. 
Cf. Sclav. 

Slavic, slav'ik, slav'ik. 

Cf. Sclavic. 
sleazy, sle'zi, sla'zi. 
sleek, slek. 
sleight, slit. 
Sligo, sli'go. 
slink (Scot.), slenk. 
slocken (Scot.), sl6k''n. 

sofa, lov&ble, eve, event, end, recent, 
poffeej oddj (cpnnect, lepq^r^, g (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



219 



slough (cast-off skin), sluf; 

(a mud-hole), slou. 
slough (Scot.), slooCH. 
sluice, sloos. 
Sluis, slois. 
smit (Scot.), smet. 
Smolensk, smolyensk' ; 

(Aug.), Smolensk', 
snick (Scot.), snek 
snout, snout. 
Snowdon, sno'dun. 
snowk (Scot.), snook. 
Sobieski, sobye'skS. 
sobriety, sObri'Sti. 
sobriquet, s 6 b r e k a ' ; 

(Aug.), so'brika. 
soccer, s5k'er. 
Socinus, sOsi'nus. 
sociology, soshi61'6dzi. 
Sofia, sofe'a, so'fSya. 
soften, sof ^n. 
softly, soft'li. 

sa'ha. 

soi-disant, swa'dezan'. 

soiree, swara', swara', 

swora'. 

Soissons, swason'. 

sojourn, so'dztirn, sodztirn'. 

The accent is the same for 
substantive and verb. British 
usage recognizes only the first. 



solace, sol'^s. 

solder, sod'er. 

solecism, s51'5siz^m, so'- 

ISsiz'm. 
solenm, s51'em. 
solemnity, sOlem'niti. 
solenmization, s51emniza'- 

shun, solemniza'shun. 
solemnize, sol'emniz. 
Solent, so'lent. 
solfeggio, sSlfed'dzo. 
Solferino, s51fere'no. 
solstice, sol'stis. 
soluble, sSriub'l. 
solution, sSIiu'shfin. 
Somaliland, sQma'lSland. 
sombrero, sombra'ro. 
sombrous, som'brus. 
somnambulism, s5mnam'- 

biuliz'm. 
somnambulist, s6mnam'- 

biulist. 
Somnus, s5m'nus. 
sonata, sona'ta. 
song, song. 
Sonnambula, La, la sSnam'- 

boola. 
sonorous, sOno'rus, son'- 

8rus. 
Sontag, zSn'taCH. 
soot, soot, soot. 



ohr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menu, food, f66t, out, oil, ai?gle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



220 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



soothsayer, sooth'saer. 
sophism, s5f' iz'm. 
Sophrosyne, sOfros'ine. 
soporific, sopSrif ik. 
soprano, s6pra'no. 
Sorbonne, sorbon'. 
Sorel, sSrel'. 
sorites, sSri'tez. 
sorority, s8ror'iti. 
Sorosis, soro'sis. 
sotto voce, sot'to vo'cha. 
soubrette, soobret'. 
Souchez, soosha'. 
souchong (tea), sooshong'. 
souffle, soofia', soo'fla. 
sough, suf, sou; (Scot.), 

sooCH. 
Soulouque, soolook'. 
Soult, soolt. 
sou marque, soo marka', 

m&rke'. 
soupgon, soopson'. 
Sousa, soo'za. 
souse, sous. 

soutane, sootan', sootan'. 
souter (Scot.), soo'ter. 
southerly, sutb'erli. 
southern, sutfe'ern. 
Southey, south'i, suth'i. 
Southron, siitb'run. 

ale, senate, cHre, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Southwark, s u th ' e r k , 

south'wek. 
souvenir, soovener', soo'- 

vener. 
sovereign, s5v'erin, siiv'- 

erin. 
sowter (Scot.), sooter. 
Spa, spa, spo. 
spaghetti, spaget'i. 
Spandau, shpan'dou. 
specie, spe'shi. 
species, spe'shez. 
specious, spe'shus. 
spectator, spekta'ter. 
speedometer, sped5m'eter. 
spermaceti, spermase'ti. 
Spezia, spets'ya. 
spherical, sfer'ikal. 
spheroid, sfe'roid. 
spikenard, spik'nard. 
spinach, spin'adz, spin'ech. 
spinet, spin'et, spinet'. 
Spinoza, spmo'za. 
spirituel, sperettiel'. 
spirituelle, sperettiel'. 
splenetic, splSnet'ik, splen'- 

Stik. 
spleuchan (Scot.), sploo'- 

CHan. 
Spokane, spokan'. 
spondaic, sponda'ik. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



221 



(It.), 



hSl'- 



spontaneity, spontane'iti. 
spoon, spoon. 
Sporades, spor'Sdez. 
sporran (Scot.), spOr'an. 
spouse spouz. 
sprachle (Scot.), sprak"l, 

spr&CH'^l. 
spraickle (Scot.), sprEk'^l. 
sprauchle(Scot.) ,spraCH'^l. 
spreagh (Scot.), spreCH, 

spraCH. 
spring (Scot.), spreng. 
sprit (Scot.), sprSt. 
spruce, sproos. 
spuilzie (Scot.), spiil'yi. 

See note on assoilzie, 
spule (Scot.), spill. 
Spurzheim, shpoorts'him. 
Spuyten Duyvil, spit'en 

di'vil. 
squalid, skw61'id. 
squalor, skworor, skwa'lor. 
squamose, s k w a ' m o s , 

skwamos'. 
squamous, skwa'mus. 
squeamish, skwem'ish. 
squirrel, skwtir'el, skwir'el. 
British usage prefers the sec- 
ond, but it is not naturalized 
in the United States. 

Stabat Mater, sta'bat 
ma't^r, sta'bat ma'ter. 

ohr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menu, food, foot, out, oil, aijgle, paft, thin, 
that, a^ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



staccato, stak5,'to ; 

stakka'to. 
Stael-Holstein, sta'el 

stin; (Fr.), 

Slstan'. 
Stagira, stadzi'ra. 
Stagirite, stadz'irit. 
stalactite, stalak'tit. 
stalagmite, stalag'mit. 
stalwart, stol'wert, st51'- 

w^rt. 
Stamboul, stS,mbool'. 
stamen, sta'men. 
stanch, stanch, stanch, 
stanchion, stan'shun. 
Stanislas Leszczynski, 

stan'islas lyeshchin'- 

y'ske. 
Stanislaus, stamslou'. 
starboard, star'bord, st3,r- 

berd. 
Statira, stati'ra. 
statistician, statistish'Sn. 
statuesque, statiuesk'. 
status, sta'tfis. 
status quo, sta'tus kwo. 
staunch, stanch, stanch, 
staves, stavz. 
stearic, stSar'ik. 
stearin, ste'arin. 
stech (Scot.), steCH. 



222 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Steelyard, stel'y^rd, stil'- 

y^rd. 
Steen, Jan, y3.n stan. 
steinbok, stin'b6k. 
Stephanie, stafane'. 
Stephano, stef'ano. 
stereopticon, st6rfe5p'- 

tik5n. 
stereoscope, ster'S8skop, 

ste'rSoskop. 
stereotype, ster'SStip, ste'- 

rSStip. 
sterile, ster'il. 
stertorous, st^r't8rus. 
stethoscope, steth'Sskop. 
Stettin, steten'. 
Steuben, von, f6n stiu'bgn; 

(Ger.), fSn shtoi'ben. 
Steyn, stin. 
stick (Scot.), stSk. 
stickit (Scot.), stSk'it. 
stiletto, stilet'o. 
Stilicho, stil'iko. 
stilt (Scot.), stelt. 
stimpart (Scot.), stSm'pert. 
sting (Scot.), steng. 
stipend, sti'pend. 
stithy, stitfe'i, stith'i. 
stiver, sti'ver. 
stodgy, st6d'zi. 

ale, senate, cHre, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Stogy, sto'gi. 
Stoicism, sto'Mz'm. 
Stoke Poges, stok po'dzfe. 
Stolypin, st51i'pin. 
stomachal, stum'&kal. 
stomacher, stiim'uk^f, 

stum'acher. 
stomachic, st6mak'ik. 
stomatitis, stomS,ti'tis. 
stot (Scot.), st8t. 
stour (Scot.), stoor. 
stouth (Scot.), stooth. 
stouthrief (Scot.), stooth'- 

ref. 
stowlins (Scot.), stou'linz. 
stown (Scot.), stoun. 
stowth (Scot.), stooth, 

stouth. 
strabismus, strabiz'mfis. 
Stradivarius, str^diva'rius. 
Strassburg, shtras'boorCH ; 

(Ang.), stras'btirg. 
strata, stra'ta. 
strategic, strate'dzik, str&- 

tedz'ik. 
strategist, strat'Sdzist. 
strategy, strat'^dzi. 
Stratford-on-Avon, strSt'- 

f^rd on a'von. 
stratum, stra'tum. 

BofS, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



223 



straucht (Scot.), stroCHt. 
Strephon, strgf'5n. 
striped, stript, stri'pgd, 

strip'Id. 
Stromboli, strSm'bfile. 
strop, str5p. 
Strophades, strSf'adez. 
strophe, stro'fS. 
strophic, str5f'ik. 
Strumitsa, str6omits'3,. 
strychnine, strik'nin, strik'- 

nen. 
student, stiu'dent. 
studious, stiu'di&s. 
stupendous, stiupen'dfis. 
stupid, stiu'pid. 
Sturm, shtoorm. 
Sturm xmd Drang, shtoorm 

oont drang'. 
Stuttgart,stut'gart, shtoot'- 

girt. 

The Hanoverian pronunciation 
is std6t'gart. 

Stuyvesant, sti'vesant. 

Stygian, stidz'ian. 

styptic, stip'tik. 

Styx, stiks. 

suasory, swa'sSri. 

suave, swav, sw5.v. 

suavity, swSv'iti, swi'viti. 

ohr, iu=u in use, Am, up, circus, menii, food, f66t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH = Germ. icA, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



subaltern, sfibol'tSrn, siib'- 
oltern. 
In British Army usage, always 
the second. 

subdue, sSbdiu'. 
subject, sub'dzgkt. 
Sublime Porte, sublim' 

port, 
subliminal, sublim'inaL 
sublunar, siibliu'nSr. 
sublunary, siib'liunSri. 
subpoena, subpe'na. 
subsidence, sft b s i d ' e n s , 

siib'sldens. 
subsist, subsist', 
subsistence, subsis'tens. 
substantiate, substSn'shlat. 
substantival, substanti'v&l, 

sub'stantival. 

substrata, siibstra'tS. 

subtUe, siib'til, s\it"l. 

subtle, siit'a. 

succinct, stiksinkt'. 

Suchau, soo'chou'. 

Suchet, siichS'. 

Sucre (coin), soo'kra. 

So pronounced, also, as a 
proper name, that of the Bolivian 
statesman for whom the coin is 
named. 

Sudan, sood&n'. 



224 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Sudermann, zoo'derman. 
Sue, Eugene, ozen' sii. 
suede, swad; (Fr.), swed. 
Suetonius, sweto'nius. 
Suez, sooez', soo'ez. 
suffice, Sufis', 
suffragan, suf'ragan. 
suffragette, sufrSidzet'. 
suffragist, suf'radzist. 
suffuse, sufiuz'. 
Sufi, soo'fg. 
Sufism, soo'fiz'm. 
suggest, sfigdzest'. 
sugh (Scot.), sooCH. 
suicidal, siuisi'dal. 
suit, siut. 
suite, swet. 
Sulla, sul'a. 
Sully -Prudhomme, s ii 1 e ' 

prudSm'. 
sulphate, sul'fat. 
sulphide, siirfid, sul'fid. 
sulphite, sfll'fit. 
sulphurate, sul'fiurat. 
sulphureous, stilfiu'rS&s. 
sulphuret, sul'fiuret. 
sulphuretted, sul'fiuretSd. 
sulphurous, sul'furus, sul'- 

fiurus. 
Sulpician, stilpish'an. 

He, senlite, c&re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
th^e, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, drb. 



sultan, siirtan, sooltan'. 
sultana, sult3.'na, sulta'na. 
sumac, siu'mS,k, shoo'mak. 
Sumatra, sooma'tra. 
sumph (Scot.), surnf. 
sumptuous, sump'tiuus. 
sundae, sun'da. 
supererogate, siuperer'Sgat. 
supererogation, siuperero- 

ga'shfin. 
supererogatory, siuperSog'- 

at8ri. 
superficies, siuperfish'iez, 

siup^rfish'ez. 
superfluous, siup^r'floous. 
supine, siupin', siu'pin. 

The adjective may be pro- 
nounced either way (the first is 
preferred). The grammatical 
term (substantive) has the sec- 
ond sound only. 

supple, sup"l. 

supposititious, sup5zitish'- 

Gs. 
sur^ shoor. 
Surinam, soorin3;m'. 
surname (subst.), stlr'nam; 

(verb), sAr'nam, sur- 

nam'. 
surquidry (Scot.), stir'- 

kSdri. 

sofa, lov&ble, eve, Svent, iSnd, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



225 



surtout, sfirtoot', sfirtoo'; 

(Fr.), siirtoo'. 
surveillance, surval'yans, 

sfirvarans. 
survey (verb), sfirva'; 

(subst.), s<ir'va, surva'. 
Susa, soo'sa, 
Susan, siu'san. 
suttee, siite'. 
suture, siu'tiur. 
Suvaroff, soova'rSf. 
Suvorov, s66v6'r6f. 
Suwanee, soowo'nS. 
Suwarow, soowar'o. 

More commonly written Su- 
vorov. 

suzerain, siu'zerSin. 
svelte, svelt. 
Sverdrup, sver'droop, 
Swabia, swa'bia. 
swami, swa'mi. 
swan, sw5n. 
swank (Scot.), swank. 
As British slang, swdrik, 
Swansea, sw5n'se. 
swarthy, swor'thi, swortfei. 
swath, swoth, swSth. 
swathe, swath. 
Swedenborg, swe'd^nborg. 
swingeing, swin'dzmg. 



swingel, swin'g'l, swin'dzl. 
sword, sord. 
Sybaris, sib'aris. 
sybarite, sib'arit. 
sycophancy, sik'Sfansi. 
sycophant, sik'ofant. 
Sydenham, sid'nam. 
syenite, si'gnlt. 
syllabication, silabika'- 

shun. 
syllogism, sil'6dziz'm. 
Symonds (John Adding- 

ton), slim'finz. 
Symons (Arthur), sim'finz. 
Symplegades, simplgg'S-dez. 
symposium, simpo'zi&m. 
synaeresis, siner'Ssis. 
synagogical, sinagSdz'ikal. 
synchronal, sin'kr6nal. 
synchronism, sin'krSniz'm. 
synchronization, sinkr6ni- 

za'shun, sinkrOniza'- 

shun. 
synchronize, sifn'krSniz. 
synchronous, sin'krSnus. 
synclinal, smkli'nal, sin'kll- 

nal. 
syncope, sm'kSpS. 
synecdoche, sinek'd6k§. 



bhr, iu=u in use, Am, iip, circus, menu, food, f66t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
y^at, a?ure, CH=Germ. icht h (Ft.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



226 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



syneresis, smer esis. 
synod, sm'ud. 
synodal, sin'udal. 
sjoionym, s!n'6nim. 
synonymize, sinon'imiz. 
Synope, sino'pS. 
synthesize, sin'thSsiz. 



Syracuse, sir'akius, sir- 

akius'. 
syringa, sirin'ga. 
syrinx, sir'mks. 
systole, sis'tSle. 
syzygy, siz'idzi. 
Szechenyi, sa'chenyS. 



ale, senate, c&re, at, accord, arm, ask, sofa, lovable, eve, event, ^nd, recent, 
there, ov^r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, coffee, odd, connect, lemon, o (Germ.) 



tabard, tSb'^rd. 

So pronounced as the name 
of the inn. 

tableau, tablo'. 
tableaus, t^bloz'. 
tableaux, t^bloz', tablo'. 
table d'hote, tabF dot', 
taboret, tSb'Sret. 
tabouret, tSb'oorgt, tab- 

oora'. 
tacet, ta'sSt. 
tacit, tas'it 

taciturnity, tSs'ittirnM. 
Tacoma, tS,ko'm&. 
tael, tal. 

Tagliamento, tMyimSn'to. 
Taglioni, talyo'ne. 
Tagus, ta'gtis. 
Tahiti, ta'hSte, t^he'tS. 
Tahoe, ta'ho, t&'ho. 
tailzie (Scot.), tal'yi. 

See note on assoilzie. 
Taiping, ti'ping'. 
Taj Mahal, t&dz mShM'. 
Takahira, tS^'kahe'ra. 
Talavera (Battle of), tS^li- 
va'ri. 

bhr, iu=u in use, Am, iSp, circ{is, menii, food, fd&t, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, p (Fr,) irioji. ^e complete Jcey, pages 15-20, 



talc, tSlk. 
Taliaferro, tSl'ivSr. 
Talleyrand-Perigord, tal- 

6r5,n' pareg6r'; (Ang.), 

tai'irand. 
Talma, talma'. 
Talmud, t^l'mud. 
talus, ta'lfis. 
tamale, tama'lS. 
Tamaulipas, t&mS,oole'pSs. 
tambour, tSm'boor, tSm'- 

ber. 
Tamerlane, tam'eplan. 
Tamora, t^m'tvL 
Tampico, tampe'ko. 
tanager, tS,n'5,dz6r. 
Tanagra, tSn'&grS. 
Tanais, tSn'Jis. 
Tancred, t^n'krSd. 
Taney, to'ni. 
Tanganyika (Lake), tin- 

gS,nye'k§;. 
tangential, t^ndzSn'shS-L 
tangerine, t^n'dz^ren, tto- 

dzeren'. 
As a proper noun or adjective, 
the accent is on the last syllable. 



228 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Tangier, t2,ndzer'. 

Tannhauser, tan'hoiz^r. 

tansy, tSn'si. 

tant mieux, t§,n myo'. 

Ta'6. 

tapir, ta'pej*. 

tapis, ta'pis, tap'is, tape'. 

Tappan Zee,tap'an ze, tap'- 

Also written Tappaan Zee. 
Tara, tS'ra, t^r'S. 
tarantula, t&ran'tiulS. 
taraxacum, tSrSk's^kum. 
tarlatan, tar'latan. 
Tamow, tar'noof. 
tarpaulin, tarp6'lin. 
Tarpeia, tarpe'yS;. 
Tarpeian, tarpe'yS-n^ 
Tarquin, tar'kwin. 
Tarshish, tar'shish. 
Tartufe, tartoof; (Fr.), 

tartiif. 
task, task. 

Tasmania, tazma'niS. 
Tasso, tas'o; (It.), tfe'so. 
tatterdemalion, taterdS- 

mal'yun, tatej-dSm^l'- 

yfin. 
taube, tou'bfe. 

Said to be already Anglicized 
as tdb in the war zone. 

ale, senate, cAre, tkt, Accord, Srm, ask, 
tbSre, ovfir, Eddn, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Tauchnitz, touCH'nits. 
taunt, tant, tdnt. 
Taunton, tan'tfin, t6n'- 

tun. 
Taurus, to'rfis. 
taxidermal, tS-ksider'mal. 
taxidermic, taksider'mik. 
taxidermist, tak'sidermist. 
taxidermy, tak'sidermi. 
taximeter, taksim'St^r. 
Tchad, chad. 
Tchaikowsky, chikof skS. 
Also spelled Tschaikowsky. 
Tchemyshevsky, cherne- 

shef'ske. 
Tchu, choo. 
technique, teknek'. 
Tecumseh, tekum'sS. 
Te Deum, te de'um. 
tedious, te'dius, ted'yus. 
tedium, te'dium. 
teepee, te'pe. 
Teheran, teh'ran'. 
Tehuacan, taw&k^n'. 
Tehuantepec, tawantS.pek'. 
Telamon, tel'am6n. 
telegrapher, teleg'rSfer. 
telegraphist, tgleg'rafist, 

tel'Sgrafist. 
telegraphy, tsleg'rafi. 
Tel-El-Kebir, t61 SI kSber'. 

sofS, lovable, eve, event, Snd, recent, 
cSffee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



229 



Telemachus, tSIgm'akus. 
Telemaque, talamak'. 
teleology, telSoI'Sdzi, 

telSSl'odzi 
telepathic, telSpath'ik. 
telepathist, telep'athist. 
telepathy, tSIep'athi. 
telephonic, tel5f6n'ik. 
telephonist, tel'sfonist. 
telephony, tSIef'Oni, tel'- 

gfoni. 
telescopy, tgles'k8pi, tel'- 

Sskopi. 
telestich, tsles'tik, tel'gstik. 
Temora, tSmor'a. 
Tempe, tem'pS. 
temperament, t g m'p e r a- 

ment. 
temperature, tem'peratiur. 
temporale, tempOra'le. 
tenable, ten'ab'l. 
tenacious, tena'shus. 
tendre, tan'dr'. 
tendresse, tandres'. 
Tenebrae, ten'ebre. 
Tenedos, ten'gdSs. 

In modern Greek, t^n'tihos. 

Tenerife, tenerif; (Span.), 

tanare'fa. 
tenet, ten'et. 
Teniers (David), (Fr.), 



tenya',teny4r'; (Eng.), 
tSn'yerz; (Flemish), 
teners'. 

Tenniel (Sir John), ten'yel. 

Teocalli, teSkal'S. 

tepee, te'pe, te'pe- 
Cf. teepee. 

tepid, tSp'id. 

tergiversate, ter'dziversat. 
tergiversation, terdziversa'- 

shun. 
termagant, ter'magant. 
Termonde, termond'. 
Terpsichore, terpsik'Sre. 
Terpsichorean, terpsik6re'- 

an. 
Terracina, terrache'na. 
terrain, teran', ter'an. 
terraqueous, tera'kwSus. 
Terre Haute, ter'e hot', 
terreplein, tar'plan. 
terrin^, teren'. 
Tesla, Nikola, neko'la 

tes'la. 
testamur, testa'mur. 
testator, testa'tor. 
tetanus, tet'anus. 
tete-a-tete, tat atat', tet 



Tete Noire, tSt nwar'. 
Tethys, te'this. 



ohr, iu = u in use, Am, up, circus, menu, f55d, f66t, out, oil, aqgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



230 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



tetragonal, tetrSg'SnaL 
Tetrazzini, tatratse'ne. 
Teucer, tiu'ser. 
Teufelsdrockh, Herr, her 

toi'felsdrok. 
teugh (Scot.), tiuCH. 
Thaddeus, thad'Sus. 
Thais, tha'is; (Fr.), ta'es'. 
It has the French sound as 
the name of Massenet's opera. 

Thalaba, thal'aba. 

Thales, tha'lez. 

Thalia, thali'a. 

Thames, temz. 

thaumaturgist, thomSttir'- 
dzist. 

thaumaturgy, t h 6 ' m a - 
tArdzi. 

the (emphatic), the; (be- 
fore vowel), thi; be- 
fore consonant), the. 

theater, the'ater. 

Theatre Comique, taatr' 
k6mek'. 

Theatre Frangais, taa'tr' 
franse'. 

Thebaid, the'b^id. 

their, tha^p, thdr. 

Theiss, tis. 

Themis, the'mls. 

ale, senate,' c&re, at, accord, arm, ask, 
there, ov6r, Eden, ice, HI, old, obey, 6rb, 



Themistocles, thSmis'tdk-. 

lez. 
thenceforth, thensforth', 

thens'forth. 
Theobald, thVsbold, thib'- 

old, tib'old. 
theocrasy, thg5k'rasi. 
Theocritean, ths5k'rite'an. 
Theocritus, th56k'ritus. 
theologue, the'616g. 
theosophist, thSos'6flst. 
theosophy, thg6s'6fi. 
therapeutic, therapiu'tik. 
there, thdr. 

When unstressed (weak), 
usually ihSj or before a vowel 
thW. 

therefor, thdrfor'. 

Cf. therefore, 
therefore, ^ar'for, ther'for. 
thereof, thar6v', th^rof. 
thereout (Scot.), thdroot'. 
Therese (Fr.), taraz'. 

The German form (without 
the accents) is pronounced ^^m'2^. 

therewith, thdrwith', thay- 

with'. 
Thermidor, termed8r'; 

(Ang.), th^rmid6r'. 
Thermopylae, thermSp'ile. 
Thersites, thersi'tez. 
Thesaurus, thSs6'rfis. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, ^nd, recent, 
cofifee, odd, connect, lemon, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



231 



Theseus, the'sius, the'sSfis. 
Thessalonica, thesal&ni'ka. 
Thetis, the'tis. 
Thibet, tibet', tib'et. 
Thibetan, tibet'an. 
Thiergarten, ter'garten. 
Thierry, tySre'. 
Thiers, tydr. 
thig (Scot.), thgg. 
thigger (Scot.), thgg'er. 
Thisbe, thiz'bS. 
thocht (Scot.), th5CHt. 
Thoreau, thSro'. 
Thorn (in West Prussia), 

tSrn. 
Thorvaldsen, tdr'valsen. 
Thothmes, tot'mez, th5th'- 

mez. 
thrash, thrash. 
Thrasybulus, thrSsibiu'lus. 
Thrasymenes, thrasime'- 

nez. 
thrawn (Scot.), thron, 

thran. 
threepence, thrip'ens, 

threp'ens. 
threnode, thre'nod, thrgn'- 

od. 
threnody, thrgn'8di. 
thresh, thrgsh. 

6hr, iu»u in use, i^rn, iip. circus, menQ, f55d, fd6t, out, oil, ai^iele, part, thin, 
yiat, a^ure, CH — Germ. ich, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 16-20. 

16 



threshold, thrgsh'old. 
throstle, thr6s"l. 
throuch (Scot.), throoCH. 
Thucydides, thiusid'idez. 
thyme, tim. 
Thyrsis, thtir'sis. 
tiara, tia'rS,, t^ari. 
Tibet, tibgf, tib'gt. 
Tibullus, tibul'us. 
tic douloureux, tik dool- 

ooroo'; (Fr.), tek dool- 

ooro'. 
Tichbome, tich'b&ni. 
ticht (Scot.), tgCHt. 
Ticinus, tisi'nus. 
tiend (Scot.), tend. 
Tientsin, tSen'tsen'. 
tierce, ters. 
Tierra del Fuego, tygr'rS- 

dglfwa'go. 
Tiers £tat, tydrzata'. 
Tietjens, tet'yens, tish'- 

ygnz. 
tig (Scot.), tgg. 
Tiglath-pileser, tlg'lath- 

pfle'zer. 
timbale, t^nbal'. 
timbre, tim'b^r; (Fr.), tan'- 

br\ 



232 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Timbuktu, timbtik'too, 
tim'buktoo'. 
The second is frowned on by 
all authorities, but is in almost 
universal use. 

timmer (Scot.), tSm'^r. 
Timon, ti'm6n. 
Timour, timoor', tSmoor'. 
tint (Scot.), tent. 
Tintagil, tintSdz'il. 
Tintoretto, tent6r6t'to. 
tip (Scot.), tep, ttip. 
Tippecanoe, tipSkS,noo'. 
Tippoo Sahib, tippoo' sa'ib. 
tirade, tirad', ti'rad. 
tirailleur, teray5r'. 
Tiresias, tire'shias, tire'- 



Tirol, tir'61; (Ger.), tSrol'. 
tisane, tezan'. 
Tischendorf, von, f6n tish'- 

endorf. 
tisic, tiz'ik. 
Tisiphone, tisif'6n§. 
Tissot, tes&'. 
Tisza, te'sS. 
Titan, ti'tan. 
Titania, tita'niS. 
Titanic, titSn'ik. 
Tithonus, titho'nfis. 
Titian, tish'an. 

ale» senate, ckre, It, accord, irm, ask, 
thSre, ov6r, Eden, ice, Sll, old, obey, 6rb, 



Titicaca, titSkS^'ka. 

Tito Melema, te'to mila'- 

mL 
Tityrus, tft'iriis. 
tivoli, tiv'61i. 
Tobolsk, tdbSlsk'; (Russ.), 

tab&l'y'sk. 
tocher (Scot.), t8CHer. 

"A tocherless lass wi* a lang pedigree." 

Tale'do; (Span.), t61a'tfeo. 
Tolstoy, tdl'stoi, tolstoi'. 
tomato, tOma'to, t8ma'to. 
Tomsk, tomsk. 
ton (fashion), ton. 
Tonkin, t5nkin'. 
tonsure, tSn'shiur. 
tontine, tSn'ten, tSnten', 
toolyie (Scot.), tooryi. 
toom, tiim, tum. 

"Toom hame cam the saddle. 
But never cam he." 

topographer, t6p5g'raf^r. 
topographic, t5pSgraf'ik. 
toque, tok. 
torchon, tor'shSn; (Fr.), 

t6rsh6n'. 
toreador, torS§,d8r', t6re- 

Ador'. 
torment (subst.), tor'mSnt; 

(verb), tSrment'. 
tornado, tSrna'do. 

sofS, lovable, eve, Svcnt, J*nd, reccntf 
cSffee, odd, connect, lemdn, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



233 



Torquay, t5rke'. 
Torquemada, de, da t6r- 

Torres Vedras, tSr'resh 

va'dr&sh. 
Tonicelli, t^rrSchel'Ie. 
tortoise, tor'tus, tor'tis. 
Tortugas, t6rtoo'g3,z. 
Tosca, La, IS. t6s'klt. 
Totleben, tatlye'ben. 
toucan, took&n', too'kSn. 
Toulon, toolon'. 
Toulouse, toolooz'. 
toun (Scot.), toon, 
toupee, toope'. 
toupet, toopa'. 
tour, toor. 

tour de force, toor d6f firs'. 
Tourgee, toorza'. 
tourmaline, toor'mAUn. 
tournament, toor'nament, 

tur'nament. 
tourney, toor'ni, ttir'ni. 

William Morris gives it the 
French sound for archaic effect: 

"A golden gilliflower to-day 
I wore upon my helm alway, 
And won the prize of this tourney. 
Hah! hah! la belle jaune giroflee." 

tourniquet, toor'niket, t<ir'- 
niket, toorneka'. 
The last, though often heard, 
is said to be not fully naturalized 
in Enghsh. 



toumure toornur'. 
Tours, toor. 

touse (Scot.), tooz, toos. 
tousle (Scot.), too'z'l. 
Toussaint TOuverture, too- 

sSn' looverttir'. 
toustie (Scot.), toost'K. 
tousy (Scot.), touz'i, tooz'L 
tout (scout or watchman), 

tout, 
tout (Scot.), toot, 
tout a fait, tootafS'. 
tout bien ou rien, too 

bySn noo ryUn'. 
tout court, too koor'. 
tout de suite, too dS swet'. 
tout ensemble, tootSn- 

s&n'br. 
toward, to'^rd, tord. 
towards, toerdz, tordz. 
town (Scot.), toon. 
Townshend, toun'zSnd. 
towzie (Scot.), touz'i. 
trachea, tra'kSa, trake'4. 
tracheotomy, trakS5t'6mJ. 
trachle (Scot.), trSCH'l. 
tractile, trak'til. 
Trafalgar (Cape), trS'fal- 

gar; (Square), trafal'- 

gar; (Viscount), trafel- 

g^r'. 

Qhr, iu=u in use, <irn, up, circus, menii, food, fd6t, out, oil, ai^gle, part, thin, 
that, a^ure, CH »= Germ, ich, ft (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



234 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



tragacanth, trag'akanth. 
traject (verb), tradzekt'; 

(subst.), tradz'ekt. 
trajectory, tradzek't6ri. 
tramontane, tr4m5n'tan, 

trS,m'ontan. 
trance, trans, 
transference, transfer'ens, 

trSns'ferens. 
transition, transiz'un, tran- 

sish'un, tranzish'un. 
transmigrate, trans'mi- 

grat, transmi'grat. 
transport (verb), trans- 
port'; (subst.), trSns'- 

port. 
Transvaal, trtosvM'. 
Trasimenus (Lake), tra'si- 

me'nus, tra'zSma'nus. 
Other forms are Trasimene 
(trds'tndn) and Trasimeno {trds" 
emd'nd). 

travail, trav'JI. 
Travailleurs de la Mer, 
travayor' d6 la mar', 
travertine, trS;V'ertin. 
Traviata, La, la travea'ta. 
treacle, tre'kU. 
trecento, trachen'to. 
trefoil, tre'foil. 
trek, trek. 

ale, senite, cdre, at, Scoord, &rm, ask, 
tli5re, oY^r, E(J«n, ice, jU, oW. Obey, ftrbi 



tremolo, trem'61o. 
Tre'mont (Street, Boston). 
Trente et Quarante, tran'- 

ta karant'. 
Trentino, trente'no. 
trepan, trypan', 
trephine, trSfin'. 
Trethewy, trithiu'i. 
Trevelyan, trSvel'yan. 
triad, tri'ad. 
triangle, tri'^ng'I. 
Trianon, Grand, Petit, 

gran, pete', treanon'. 
Triassic, trias'ik. 
Triboulet, tre'boo'le'. 
trichiasis, triki'asis. . 
trichina, triki'na. 
trichiniasis, trikini'asis. 
trichinosis, trik'ino'sis. 
trickie (Scot.), trek'i. 
tricot, tre'ko. 
tricycle, tri'sik'l. 
Trient, trgent'. 
Trieste, truest', 
trigamy, trig'ami. 
trilobate, trilo'bat. 
trilobite, tri'18bit. 
trilogy, tril'Sdzi. 
trimeter, trim'Ster. 
trindle (Scot.), tren'd'l. 

sofa, lovable, eve, Ivent, end, recSnt, 
Q§ff^e, p44, CQRRect, l^m^Q, 6 (Germ,) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



235 



Trinidad, trin'idad'; 

(Span.), treneth^th'. 
Trinitarian, trinita'rian. 
trio, tre'o, trl'o. 
tripartite, tripar'tit. 
triplicate, trip'likat. 
tripod, tri'p6d. 
Tripoli, trip'Oli. 
tripos, tri'p6s. 
Triptolemus, tript5l'Smus. 
triptych, trip'tik. 
trireme, tri'rem. 
Tristan und Isolde, trestan' 

oont ezol'dfi. 
triste, trest. 

The word is now archaic ex- 
cept as borrowed from the 
French. Down to the mid- 
eighteenth century it was nat- 
uralized as trlsL 

trisyllabic, tris'ilSb'ik. 
trisyllable, trMl'ab^. 
Triton, tri'ton. 
triumvir, trium'vej". 
triumvirate, trmm'vir&t. 
triumviri, trmm'viri. 
triime, tri'iun. 
trivial, triv'ial. 
Trocadero, Le, le trSkS,- 

daro'; (Ang.), tr&k- 

&da'ro. 

bhr, iu«=u in use, Am, up, ciro&s, menii, f65d, f^t, out, oil, apgle, partf thin, 
that, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, h (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



troche, tro'kg. 

The older pronunciations, 
trosh, troch, trok, are in use in 
England, where the American 
sound of the word is called vul- 
gar, and the form trochee (in this 
sense) commercial. 

trochee, tro'ke. 

This is the accepted form and 
sound of the word as the name 
of a kind of poetic foot. For its 
other sense, see troche. 

troglodyte, tr6g'16dit. 

Troilus, tro'ilus. 

Trois Mousquetaires, Lesj 

la trwa moosketdr'. 
troll, trol. 
Trollope, trSl'up. 
trombone, tr5m'bon, trSm- 

bon'. 
Trondhjem, tr5n'ySni. 
trope, trop. 
tropical, tr5p'ikal. 
Trossachs, tr5s'aks. 
troth, trSth. 

Troubetzkoy, troobets'koi. 
trousseau, trooso'. 
Trovatore, II, el trovMo'- 

ra. 
Troyes, trwa. 
Troyon, trwa'y6n. 
truculence, triik'iulSns. 
true, troo. 



236 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



truffle, trtif"l, trdof'^. 
Trujillo, troohel'y5. 
truncheon, trun'sh&n. 
tryst, trist, trist. 

British usage recognizes only 
the second. 

tsar, ts^r. 

tsarevitch, tsar'evich. 
tsarevna, ts&rev'na. 
tsarina, tsare'nS,. 
tsaritza, tsaret'sa. 
tsarowitch, tsar'evich. 
tsarowitz, tsar'ovits. 
Tsarskoe Selo, tsar'skOye 

syelo'. 
Tschaikovsky, chikof'ske. 

Also spelled Tchaikovsky^ 
Tchaikowksi, etc. 

Tsech, tsek. 
tube, tiub. 
Tucson, toos5n'. 
Tuesday, tiuz'dS. 
Tuileries, twel're'. 
tuilyie (Scot.), tool'yi- 
tulip, tiu'lip. 
tulle, tool, 
tumor, tiu'mer. 
tumult, tiu'mult. 
time, tiun. 
turbine, t^r'bin, tAr'bin. 

ale, senate, c&re, ^t, accord, Irm, Ssk, 
thgre, ovftr, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, drb, 



Turgenev, tobrgen'y^f. 

There are a dozen ways of 
spelling this name, and half as 
many ways of pronouncing it. 
The form and sound here given 
are widely accepted. 

turgid, tiir'dzid. 
Turgot, tiir'gd'. 
Turin, tiu'rin. 
Turkestan, t6or'kest2<n'. 
Tuskeegee, tuske'gS. 
Tussaud's, tlisoz. 
tutelar, tiu'telar. 
tutor, tiu'ter. 
tutti frutti, toot'tg froot'tS. 
Tutuila, tootobe'la. 
Tuxedo, tukse'do. 
Twickenham, twik'^nam. 
twopence, tiip'ens. 
twopenny, tup'eni. 
Tybalt, tib'alt. 
Tycoon, tikoon'. 
Tydeus, ti'dius, tid'Sus. 
tympanum, tim'panum. 
typhoon, tifoon'. 
typhus, ti'fus. 
typist, tip'ist. 
typographer, tipSg'rM^r. 
typographic, tipftgraf'ik. 
typographical, tip6grSf'- 

ikal. 
typography, tip5g'r5,fl(. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemdn. 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



237 



typothetse, tip6th'Ste, 
tyro, ti'ro. 
Tyrol, tir'51. 
Tyrolean, tiro'lSan. 
Tyrrhene, tire'ne. 
Tyrrhenian, tire'nian. 



Tyrtaean, terte'an. 
Tyrtaeus, tSrte'us. 
Tyrwhitt, tir'it. 
tzar, tsar, 
tzarina, tsare'nS. 
tzaritza, ts^rit'sS*. 



ohr, iu=su in use, <irn, tip, circfis, menQ, food, f38t, out, oil, a^gle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



u 



ubiquitous, iubik'witfts. 
ubiquity, iubik'witi. 
Udine, oode'na. 
Uffizi, oofet'se. 
uhlan, oo'lS.n. 
Uhland, oo^l3,nt. 
uitlander, oit'lander. 
ukase, iukas'. 
Ukraine, iu'kran. 
Ulfilas, uFfilas. 

The name also appears as 
Wulfilas, Wulfila {wd6V}ilas). 

Ulrica, iU'rikS,, oolre'ka. 

Ulrici, oolret'sS. 

Ultima Thule, lirtima 

thiu'lg. 
t/ ultimatum, ultima'tum. 
"^ ' ultramontane, ultram5n'- 

tan. 
ululation, uliula'shun. 
ulyie (Scot.), uryl- 
Ulysses, iulis'ez. 
umbilical, limbil'ikaL 
umbilicus, iimbili'kus. 
umbrage, um'brS,dz. 
umbrageous, iimbra'dzfis. 
umbrella, umbrel'S.. 

ale, senate, cl^re, lit, acoord, arm, ask, 
thdre, ovfir, Eden, ice, ill, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



umlaut, oom'lout. 
umwhile (Scot.), iimhwil. 
unaccented, unaksent'ed. 
unassuming, unasium'in. 
Uncas, un'kis. 
uncial, un'shial. 
imcleanly, unklen'li. 
uncourteous, linkflr'teus. 
unctious, unk'shus. 
unctuous, unk'tiuus. 
Undine, unden', oonde'ne. 
imdisceming, tindizurn'in. 
undress (verb), undres'; 

(subst. or adj.), un'- 

dres, iindres'. 
undulatory, iin'diulatSri. 
unfrequented, iinfrgkwen'- 

ted. 
ungallant, iingal'ant, un- 

galant'. 
See gallant, 
unguent, un'gwent. 
uninterested, iinin'terestSd. 
uninteresting, umn'terest- 

ing. 
unisonal, iunis'Snal. 
unisonant, iunis'ftnant. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
, cSfEee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



239 



unisonous, iunis'8nfis. 
Unitarian, iunita'rian. 
univalent, iuniva'lent. 
uni vocal, iuniv'SMI. 
unjustifiable, iindziis'tifi- 

ab'l. 
unlearned, unltir'ned. 
unprecedented, u n p r g s'- 

edSntSd. 
unscathed, tinskathd. 
Unter den Linden, oon'- 

tSr dan Un'dSn. 
untoward, unto'Srd. 
untune, tintiun'. 
untutored, untiu't^rd. 
unwary, linwa'ri. 
Upanishads, oopSn'ishSds. 
upas, iu'p3,s. 
Upemavik, iuper'navik, 

oo'pernavik. 
Also appeais'ss Upernivik (do'' 
pern^vek'), 

uphroe, iu'fro, iu'vro. 
upright, lup'rit'. 

The position of the stress 
varies with sentence modulation. 

Upsala, upsa'13,. 
upsilon, iup'silSn. 



upupa, iu'piupSL. 

Ural, iu'ral. 

urban, tir'ban. 

Urbana, tirb^n'lL. 

urbane, tirban'. 

Urbino, oorbe'no. 

Urquhart, Ar'kSrt; (Brit.), 

A'ket. 

Less commonly written Ur- 
quart, 

ursine, ftr'sin, Ar'sin. 

Ursula, Hr'siulS. 

Uruguay, iu'roogwa, ui'- 

roogwi. 
use (verb), iuz; (subst.), 

ius. 
Ushant, Osh'ant. 
usque (Scot.), iis'kwi. 
usquebaugh, Gs'kwSbS,, fis'- 

kwebo. 
usufruct, iu'ziufrukt. 
usurious, iuziu'rius. 
usurp, iuztlrp'. 
usurpation, iuztirpa'shftn. 
usury, iu'ziurl. 
Utah, iu'to. 
Utopia, iuto'piS. 
Utrecht, iu'trgCHt. 



bhr, iu = u in use, dm, iSp, circiSs, menQ, food, f68t, out, oil, a^gle, part, thin, 
tfeat, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, 6 (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



vacate, va'kat. 
vaccine, vSk'sin. 
vacuity, vS,kiu' ti. 
vade mecum, va'dS me'- 

kum. 
vagabondize, vag'abSndiz. 
vagary, vS,ga'ri. 
vagrant, va grS^nt. 
valance, vfirSns. 
Valdes, v&ldas'. 
vale (farewell), va'le. 
valence, va'lens. 
Valenciennes, valensignz' ; 

(Fr.), va IM'sygn'. 
valeric, v3,lgr'ik, vS,le'rik. 

valet, vai'gt, vara. 

valet de chambre, vSlS' 

dg sh&n'br'. 
valetudinarian, v fi l'§ t i u'- 

dina'rian. 
Valhalla, vaihal'a. 
Valkyr, vSlkir'. 
Valkyrie, vSMr'!, vaild'rf. 
Valladolid, ykVkdoUd'; 

(Span.),vai'yitfe61e^'. 
Vallandigham, valan'dig- 

am. 

ale, senllte, oAre, ^t, acoord, &rm, Ssk, 
tbSre, ovdr, Eden, ice, !11, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



Vallombrosa, vSl'ldmbro'- 

sa. 
Valmy, valme'. 
Valois, valwa'. 
Valparaiso, valpari'zo. 

The Spanish is Valparaiso 
(vdlpdrde^so). 

vamose, vi'mos, va'mos. 
Vanbrugh, vSnbroo'. 
Vancouver, vSnkoo'v^r. 
Van Dyck, van dik'. 
Van Eyck, van ik'. 
Van Rensselaer, vSn ren'- 

sfel^r. 
Van Wyck, vSn wik'. 
vaquero, vaka'ro. 
varicocele, var'!k6sel. 
varicose, var'ikos. 
variegate, va'ri^gat. 
variola, vari'Sla. 
variorum, vario'rfim. 
varsity, var'siti. 
Vasa, va'sa. 
vase, vas, vaz. 
Vashti, vash'ti. 
Vassar, vas'er. 
Vathek, vath'gk. 

sofS, lov&ble, eve, €vent, J5nd, rec?nt, 
cSffee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



241 



Vatican, vat'Jkan. 
vaticinal, vS.t](s'in2.1. 
vaticinate, vdtfe'inat. 
Vaucluse, vokltiz'. 
Vaud, Pays de, pa'e de vo. 
vaudeville, vodVJl. 
Vaux (Calvert), voks. 
Vauxhall, vSks'hdl', voks'- 

el. 
Vecchio, vek'eo. 
vega (plain), va'gS,. 
Vega (star), ve'ga. 

See also Lope de Vega, 
vehemence, ve'hSmens. 
vehement, ve'hgment. 
vehicle, ve'hik'l. 
vehicular, vehik'iular. 
Vehmgericht, fam'geriCHt. 
Velasquez, valas'kath. 
Veldhoek, veld'hook. 
veldt, felt, velt. 
veloce (music), valo'cha. 
venal, ve'nal. 
Vendee, La, la vSnda'. 
Vendome, van'dom'. 
vendue, vendiu'. 
Venezelos, venSza'lSs. 
Venezia, vanet'syS. 
Veneziano, vanStsya'no. 
Venezuela, venSswe'la. 



Vcni, Vidi, Vici, ve'ni, vi'di, 

vi'sL 
Venice, v^n'is. 
venison, vgn'iz'n. 
venose, ve'nos. 
Vent6se, vantoz'. 
ventriloquism, v 6 n t r i 1 ' - 

fikwiz'm. 
ventriloquist, v 6 n t r il ' - 

8kw3tst. 
venue, vgn'iu. 
Vera Cruz, va'ri kroos', 

v6r'^ krooz'. 
veranda, vSran'dS. 
verbatim, v^rba'tXm. 
verbiage, vS^'biSdz. 
verbose, verbos'. 
verbosity, v^rbfts'it!. 
Vercingetorix, versindzgt'- 

Sriks. 
verd antique, v^rd'antek'. 
Verde, v^rd. 
Verdi, Giuseppe, dzoosep'- 

pe var'de. 
verdigris, v^r'digres. 
Verdim, verdun'. 
verdure, v^r'diur. 
verein, ferin'. 
Vereschagin, vye'reshch^'- 

Vergennes, de, d^ vgr'zen'. 



bhr, iu = u in use, Am, up, circus, menii, food, fd6t, out, oil, aijgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, h (Ft.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



242 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Verhaeren, verha'ren. 
verisimilitude, verisimil'- 

itiud. 
verjuice, ver'dzoos. 
vermicelli, vej-mSseri, ver- 

mechel'e. 
vermifuge, ver'mifiudz. 
vermouth, ver'mooth, ver'- 

moot. 
Also written vermuth, 

Verne, Jules, ztil vern; 

(Ang.), vArn. 
Vemet, verne'. 
Veronese, va'r&na'sa. 
Veronica, vSron'ika. 
Versailles, v e r s a ' y ' ; 

(Ang.), versalz'. 
vertebra, ver'tSbra. 
vertebrae, ver'tgbre. 
vertebral, ver'tSbral. 
vertebrate, ver'tSbrat. 
vertige, vertez'. 
vertigo, ver'tigo. 
Vertumnus, vertum'nus. 
Verulam (Lord), ver'- 

oolam, ver'iulam. 

verve, verv. 

Verviers ver'vya'. 

Vesle, vel. 

Sounded with the "open" e, 
as if written e in French. 

ale, senate, c^re, St, accord, arm, Ssk, 
there, ov^r, Eden, ice, ill, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



Vespasian, vespa'zian. 

Vevay, veva'. 

via, vi'a. 

Via Dolorosa, vi'a dol'- 

Sro'sa. 
vial, vi'al. 

vicegerent, visdze'rent. 
Vicenza, vSchent'sa. 
vice versa, vi'sS ver'sS,. 
Vichy, vish'i, ve'she. 
vicinage, vis'inSdz. 
vicinal, vis'inal. 
vicinity, visin'iti. 
viciosity, vishids'iti. 
Victor Hugo, vik'ter hiu'- 

go; (Fr.), vektor' tigo'. 
Victoria Nyanza, vikto'ria 

nyan'za. 
victoria regia, vikto'ria re'- 

dzia. 
victualer, vif'ler. 
victuals, vit'Is. 
vicuna, vikoon'ya. 
vide, vi'de. 
videlicet, videl'iset. 

Properly so pronounced when 
abbreviated viz., but usually 
translated as namely j or that is- 

Vidocq, vedok'. 
Vienna, v6§n'a. 
Vieuxtemps, vyo'tan'. 

sofa, lov6ble, eve, ilvent, end, recent, 
c5fiFee, odd, cSnnect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



243 



viola, v^o'lS, vio'la, v§6'13,. 
Viola, vi'Sla, ve'Sla, vio'la, 

veo'la. 
violin, violin'. 
Viollet-le-Duc, vy61e' 16 

diik'. 
violoncellist, ve'615nchel'- 

ist. 
violoncello, veftlonchel'o. 
virago, vira'go. 
Virchow, fer'CHo. 
Virginie, verzene'. 
virile, vir'il, vi'ril. 
virility, viril'iti. 
virtu, vertoo', ver'too. 
virtuoso, vertiuo'so. 

The word is thoroughly nat- 
uralized in English. 

virulence, vir'oolens, vir'- 

iulens. 
virulent, vir'oolent, vir'- 

iulent. 
vis-a-vis, ve'zave'. 
viscera, vis'era. 
viscid, vis'id. 
Visconti, vSskon'te. 
viscount, vi'kount. 
vise, veza'. 
Visigoth, viz'igSth. 
Vistula, vis'tiula. 
visual, viz'iudl. 

ohr, iu==u in use, tirn, iip, circus, menii, food, f66t, out, oil, a^glo, paft, thin, 



vignette, vinyet'. 

Vigny de (Alfred), dS ven'- 

ye'. 

viking, vi'kin. 

Villa (''Pancho'0,ve'ya. 

Villafranca, vel'lafran'ka. 

villain, vil'in. 

villainous, vil'mus. 

villeggiatura, villadzatoo'- 
ra. 

villein, vil'in. 

villenage, vil'enSdz. 

Villeneuve, velnov'. 

Villiers (British surname), 
vil'ez, vil'yez. 

Villiers de TIsle-Adam, de, 
de vel'ya' de lel'adah'. 

Villon, ve'yon', ve'lon'. 

vinaigrette, vinftgret'. 

vin brut, van brii'. 

Vincennes, vinsenz', van- 
sen'. 

Vinci, da, da ven'che. 

vindicative, vindik'ativ, 
vin'dikativ. 

vindicatory, vin'dikatSri. 

vineyard, vin'yard. 

vingt et un, v^ntaun'. 

vin ordinaire, van'nSrde- 
ndr. 

vinous, vi'nus. 



244 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



vitelUn, vitsrin. 

Also written vitelline. 
vitiate, vish'iat. 
Vitoria, veto'rSS,. 

Also written Vittoria, 

vitreous, vit'rSus. 
vit'riol. 
Vitry-le-Frangois, v e't r e' 

m frM'swa'. 
Vittorio Emmanuele, v^t- 

to'rgo emmanwa'la. 
vituperate, vitiu'perat. 
viva, ve'vS. 
vivace, vSv3,'cha. 
vivacious, viva'shSs. 
vivacity, vivas'iti. 
vivandier, vev5,ndya'. 
vivandiere, vevandydr'. 
viva voce, ve'viL vo'se. 
vive, ve'v. 
Vive La Republique, vev' 

la rapti'blek'. 
Vive L'Empereur, vev 

lan'pror'. 
Vive Le Roi, vev' 1^ rwa'. 
Viviani, veveS,'ne. 
viviparous, vivip'lirus, 

vivip'ariis. 

viz., viz. 

See videlicet. 

ale, senate, c&re, tkt, accord, Srm, Ssk, 
thSre, ov€r, Ed6n, ice, III, old, 6bey, 6rb, 



vizier, vizer', viz'y^r. 
vizor, viz'^r, vi'z^r. 
Vladimir, vlad'imir. 
Vladivostock, vl^div6s't5k, 

vla'dyev6st6k'. 
vocable, vo'kab'I. 
vodka, v6d'kS.. 
Voet, voot. 
Vogt, foCHt. 
vogue, vog. 
Vol'apiik. 
volatile, veFatil. 
vol-au-vent, v618vM'. 
Volga, vdl'ga. 
Volhynia, vSlin'ia. 
Volkslied, fSlks'let'. 
Volpone, v5Ipo'n6. 
Volsci, vSl'si. 
Volscian, vol'shan. 
volt, volt, 
volte-face, v61t fas', 
voluminous, v81iu'mlnfis. 
volute, voliut'. 
Von Billow, fon bii'lSv. 
Von Falkenhayn, fon fal'- 

kenhin. 
Von Hindenburg, f5n hin'- 

denboorCH. 
Von Kluck, fon klook. 
Von Moltke, fon molt'k^. 

sofa, lovable, eve, event, end, recent, 
cSffee, odd, cSnnect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



245 



von Tirpitz, fon ter'pits. 
voodoo, voo'doo, voodoo', 
vorspiel, f6r'shpel. 
Vosges, v6z. 
^ vox dei, voks de'i. 
V vox humana, v5ks hiuma'- 
nL 
vox populi, v6ks pSp'iuli. 



voyageur, vwa'yazhor'. 
vraisemblance, v r e's §. n'- 

blMs'. 
Vuelta Abajo, vwal'tS aba'- 

ho. 
vulpine, vtil'pin, vul'pin. 
vulturine, vul'tiurin, vtil'- 

tiurin. 



bhr, iu=\i in use, Am, iip, circus, menu, food, foot, out, oil, angle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ. »cfe, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



w 



Wabash, wo'bash. 
Wace, was, vfc. 

An Anglo-Norman poet (12th 
century), whose name may be 
pronounced with equal pro- 
priety as French or English. 

Wacht am Rhein, Die, 

de vaCHt km rin. 
Waco, wa'ko. 
Wagner, v3,g'ner, vach'ner. 
So pronounced as the name 
of the Gennan comjjoser. As 
an English name it is usually 
wdg'n^r, 

wagon-lit, v3.goiile'. 

Wagram, v^'grSm. 

wainscot, wan'sk5t. 

waistcoat, wast'kot, was'- 

kot, wes'kot. 

When the word was in general 
use, the last was the usual 
pronunciation. 

Wakerife (Scot.), wak'rif. 

Walcheren, vS,l'CHgren. 

Waldemar, wSl'dSm^r. 

Waldenses, w51den'sez. 

Waldersee, von, ffln val'- 

derza'. 

Waldteufel, valt'toifgl. 

ale, senate, cfire, St, accord, arm, ask, 
thgre, ov6r, Eden, ice, ill, old, obey, 6rb, 



Walhalla, w61hal'a, wM- 

hal'a, valhal'a. 
Walkiire, Die, de vMku're. 
Wallachia, wola'kiS,. 
Wallenstein, wSrenstin, 

v^l'enshtln. 
Walpurgis, valpoor'gSs. 
walrus, w61'rus. 
Waltham, w 5 1 ' t h a m ; 

(Brit.), wSl'tem. 
Walther von der Vogel- 

weide, v5,l'tSr f6n der 

fo'gglvi'dg. 
waltz, w51ts. 
wan, w5n. 

wanderjahr, vS,n'd6ry&r. 
wanderlust, van'derloost. 
want, wont, w5nt. 
wapentake, w5p'entak. 
warrant, w5r'ant. 
warrantee, w5r5,nte'. 
warrantor, w5r'ant6r, wSr'- 

anter. 
warranty, w5r'anti. 
Warsaw, w6r's6. 
Warwick, w5r'ik. 

sofa, lovable, eve, €vent, iind, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lem6n, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



247 



was, w6z. 

But in unstressed positions, 

weZy w^z, 

Wasatch, wo'sach. 

wassail, w5s'il. 

Waterloo, wo'terloo'. 

In British usage generally 
stressed on the last syllable, but 
on the first when used attrib- 
utively, as Waterloo Station; by 
some speakers stressed always 
on the first. 

Watervliet, wote^vlet'. 

Watteau, va'to'; (Ang.), 

wato'. 

waucht (Scot.), waCHt. 

waugh (Scot.), woCH. 

Waukegan, woke'gan. 

Waukesha, wo'kgshd. 

weal, wel. 

Wealden, wel'd'n. 

weapon, wep'un. 

Weber, von, f6n va'ber. 

wecht (Scot.), weCHt. 

Wednesday, wenz'dS,. 

Weehawken, weho'ken. 

Weenix, va'niks. 

weght (Scot.), wSCHt. 

Weihaiwei, wa'hi'wa'. 

Weimar, vi'mar. 

weir (dam), wer. 

weird, werd. 

weise (Scot.), wiz. 



Wellesley, welz'li. 
Welsbach, welz'bak, v^s'- 

baCH. 
Wemyss, wemz. 
Wenceslaus, wen'seslos. 
were-wolf, wer'woolf. 
Werther, ver'ter, wer'ter. 
Weser, va'zer. 
Westhoek, west 'hook. 
West 'minster, westmin'- 

st^r. 
Westmoreland, wSst'mSr- 

land, west'morrnd. 
Westphalia, westfa'lia. 
Weyler (General), wa'ler. 
Weymari (Stanley J.), wi'- 

man. 
wherewith, hwarwith'. 
wherewithal, hw^rwithol'. 
whid (Scot.), hwud. 
whigmaleerie (Scot.)? 

hwSg'male'ri. 
whilk (Scot.), hwiilk. 
whilly (Scot.), hwiil'i. 
whillywha (Scot.), hwul'- 

ihw6. 
whilom, hwi'lfim. 
whirry (Scot.), hwlir'i. 
whissle (Scot.), hwus"l. 
Whitefield, hwit'feld. 
whitrack (Scot.), hwut'rak. 



ohr, iu=u in use, Am, up, circus, menii, food, foot, out, oil, apgle, part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 

17 



248 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



Whitsunday, h w i t's'n d a, 

hwit'siin'dS. 
Jones gives u^Vs^ndl, 
whitter (Scot.), hwii'tt^r. 
whittle (Scot.), hwiit'^. 
whittret (Scot.), hwtit'rSt. 
whorl, hwtirl, hworl. 
whortleberry, hwiir't'lbgr'L 
Wichita, wlch'!t6. 
wick (Scot.), wgk. 
widdy (Scot.), wiid'i. 
Wieland, ve'lS^nt. 
Wieniawski, vyS'nyifski. 
Wiesbaden, vSsb&'dSn. 
wig (Scot.), w6g. 
wight (Scot.), w6CHt. 
wildebeest, wild'best, vfl'- 

dSbast. 
Wilhelm, vil'hglm. 
Wilhelmina, wflhfilme'n^. 
Wilhehn Meister, vil'hglm 

mi'st^r. 
wilk (Scot.), wtilk. 
Wilkes-Barre, wilks'bSri. 
Willamette, wil^'nigt. 
willyard (Scot.), wtil'y^rd. 
wimple (Scot.), w6m'p'l. 
winch (Scot.), wSnsh, 

wunsh. 
wind (subst.), wind. 
In poetry, often mnd. 

ale, senate, cftre, &t, accord, firm, Ssk, 
thSre, ovftr, Edfen, ice, KU, old, 6bey, 6rb 



windle (Scot.), wSn'^l. 
windlestrae (Scot.), \^^n'- 

'Istra. 
windling (Scot.), \\i(n'lln. 
windrow, wind'rtt, win'ro. 
Windsor, wJtn'z^f . 
windward , wind'w^rd, 

mn'd^rd. 
Winkelried, von, ffin vin'- 

kelret. 
winna (Scot.), wiin'na. 
Winnepesaukee (Lake), 

w3[n§pfes6'kS. 
wiseacre, wiz'ak^r. 
wista'riS. 
Less commonly appears as 

witenagemot, w if t'e n IL g S- 

m6t'. 
withe, with, \vith. 
withers, with'firz. 
withes, with'z, with'z. 
withy, with'i, with'i. 
Witte, vit'6. 
wivem, wi'v^pn. 
wizen, wiz'^n. 
Wodehouse, wood'hous. 
Woevre, vov'r'. 
Woffington (Peg), w6f'in- 

tfin. 
Wolcott (Oliver), wdol'kat. 

sofS, lovable, eve, ^vent, JSnd, recent, 
cSffee, odd, connect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



249 



Wolfram von Eschenbach, 
v61'fr&m f6n 6sh'6n- 
MCH. 
Wollaston, wool'Sstfin. 
Wolseley, wo&lz'U. 
Wolsey, wool'zi. 
wombat, w5m'bat. 
women, wim'Sn, wim'in. 
wont, wtint, wont. 

Wont is preferred in British 
usage for both raeanings {custom 
and acdistomed) . For the con- 
traction (wonH) wunt is nowhere 
the favorite unless in^New Eng- 
land. 

Woolsey, wool's!. 

Woolwich, wool'ich. 

Worcester, woos't^r. 

Worms, vorms; (Ang.), 
wtifms. 

worsted (subst.), woos'tSd; 
(past tense and parti- 
ciple), wtirs'ted. 



worterbuch, vort'erbooCH. 
wound, woond, wound. 

The second now archaic but 
preserved in poetry. 

Wouwerman, wou'wfirm&n. 

wraith, rath. 

wrath, r5,th, rath. 

wreath, reth. 

wreathe, reth. 

wristband, rist'bSnd, riz'- 

b'nd. 
wroth, r6th, roth. 
Wiirttemberg, viir'tSm- 

bSrCH. 
Wu Ting Fang, woo' tin' 

fang'. 
Wyandotte, wi'Sndftt. 
WycUffe, w k'M 
Wykeham, wik'Sm. 
Wyoming, wio'ming. 
Wyss, vis. 
Wyttenbach, vit'gnb&CH. 



ohr, lu-VL in use, <irn, tip, ciroiis, menQ, food, fd8t, out, oil, a^gle, part, thin, 
0iat, a^ure, CU=Gerw, ich, ii (Fr.) mon. See pQinplete key, pages 15-20. 



X 



Xanadu, zan'^doo'. 
xanthe'n, zan'thein. 
Xanthian, zan'thian. 
xanthin, zan'thin. 
Xanthippe, zanthip'S. 
Xavier (Saint Francis), 

zav'ier. 
xebec, ze'bek. 
Xenia, ze'niS,. 
Xenocrates, z§n5k'ratez. 
Xenophanes, zen6f'anez. 



Xenophon, zSn'6f6n. 

Xeres, ha'ras'. 

Ximenes, zeme'nez, hima'- 

nas. 
xiphoid, zif'oid. 
Xorullo, horool'yo. 

More commonly written 
Jorullo, 

xylograph, zl'lSgraf. 
xylography, zilog'rafi. 
xylophone, zi'lofon. 



ale, senate, cAre, at, accord, Srm, §sk, sofS, lov&ble, eve, event, end, recent, 
there, ovfir, Eden, ice, ill, gld, obey, 6rb, coffee, odd, CQ^nect, lemdn, 6 (Germ.) 



yacht, y6t. 

Yakima, yak'im6. 

Yakutsk, yakootsk'. 

Yang-tse-Kiang, yan tse 

kean'. 

yataghan, y^t'agan. 

yauld (Scot.), yod. 

Yazoo, y^z'oo. 

ycleped, iklSpt'. 

Yeats, yats. 

So pronounced as the name 
of the Irish poet, and by most 
who bear the name; in some 
instances, however, it is yets, 

yelk, ySlk. 

Cf. yolk. 
Yemen, yem'en. 
Yenisei, yenSsS'fe. 
Yerkes, yer'kSz. 
Yggdrasyll, ig'dr4sil. 



ylang-ylang, e'Eng e'13<ng. 
yodel, yo'd'I. 
yogi, yo'ge. 
yogism, yo'giz'm. 
Yokohama, yo'k6ha'ma. 
yolk, yok, yolk. 

Cf. yelk. 
Yonge (Charlotte), yun. ^ 
Yosemite (Valley), y6- 

sSm'itg. 
Youghiogheny, y5k&ga'ni. 
yow (Scot.), you. 
yowie, you'i. 
Ypres, e'pr'. 
Ypsilanti, ipsflSn'tL 
Yriarte, erear'ta. 
Ysaye, §za'y6. 
Yucatan, y6ok2,t5ii'. 
Yvetot, ev'to'. 



ohr, m=u in nse, <irn, iip, circfis, menfl, food, f6&t, out, oil, a^^gle, part, thin, 
^at, a?ure, CH=Germ. ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



Zabdiel, zSb'dlel. 
Zabulon, zSb'iulon. 
Zacatecas, sakata'kS-s. 
Zaccheus, zake'Gs, zSk'eus. 
Zadkiel, zad'kiel. 
Zaire, zkev^ 
Zambezi, zimbe'zi, zamba'- 

z§. 
Zangwill, zSn'wfl. 
Zanzibar, zknzihkf. 
Zapata, skp&'iL 
Zarathustra, z&r&thoos'- 

tr&. 
Zauberflote, Die, de tsou'- 

bSrflote. 
zealot, zgl'fit. 
zealous, zSl'us. 
Zebedee, zSb'Sde. 
zebu, ze'biu. 
Zechariah, z6kSri'&. 
Zeebrugge, za'broogfe. 
zenana, zgna'n&. 
Zeno, ze'no. 
Zephaniah, zMkni'L 
Zephynis, zef'irfis. 

ale, sen&te, oAre, &t, accord, irm, 3sk, 
thgre, ov^r, Edin, ice, ill, 5ld, 6bey, 6rb, 



Zeppelin, zSp'SKn, tsSp'- 

61en'. 
Zermatt, ts8rmS,t'. 
Zerubbabel, zSrub'lLbeL 
zeugma, ziug'mlL. 
Zeus, zius. 
Zeuxis, ziuk'sis. 
Zimri, zim'ri. 
zincic, zink'ik. 
Zipporah, zipo'ri. 
Zobeidah, z8ba'd4, zobi'da. 
So pronounced, also, when 
written Zobeide, 

zodiac, zo'd!&k. 
zodiacal, ztdl'&k&L 
zoography, z66g'r&fl. 
zoological, zo615dz'ikSl. 
zoologist, z651'6dzist. 
zoology, zt6Vtdzi, 
zoophyte, zo'Sfit. 
zoophytology, zo8flt61'8dzi(. 
Zophiel, zo'flSl. 
Zoroaster zo'r6^s't^r. 
zouave, zooiv'. 
Zucchero, tsooka'ro. 

Also appears as Zuccaro {tsod' 
kd'ro), 

sof|[, lovable, eve, ^vent, <$nd, recent, 
coffee, odd, connect, lemdn, o (Germ.) 



EVERY-DAY PRONUNCIATION 



253 



Zuider Zee, zi'd^r ze', zi'd^r 

za', zoid'^r za. 
Zuleika, s661a'ka, zooll'ka. 
Zuloaga, thoolfia'ga. 
Zufii, zoo'nyS. 
Zurich, zoo'rik, tsu'riCH. 
Zutphen, zxit'fen. 



zwieback, tsve'bak. 
Zwingle, ts\nLn'g'L 
Zwingli, tsvin'lS. 
Zwinglian, tsvin'lian, 

zwin'lian. 
zymosis, zimo'sis. 
zymotic, zimSt'ik. 



THE END 



ohft iu=u in use, dm, iip, circus, menu, food, fd6t, out, oil, ans^e* part, thin, 
that, a?ure, CH = Germ, ich, n (Fr.) mon. See complete key, pages 15-20. 



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WILL BE ASSESSED FOR FAILURE TO RCTURN 
THIS BOOK ON THE DATE DUE. THE PENALTY 
WILL INCREASE TO 50 CENTS ON THE FOURTH 
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SEP 11 1«32 




SEP 25 1932 




APK 14 1933 


i 


*»»iL 19 1933 


r- 


gtP 21^933 




*"'^^EP 16 193b 




MAR «> 1936 






/ 

/ 



LJ V^' I V 'V, T 



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50586 



OF CAUFORNIA LIBRARY 



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